Frontline Festival: Leaders Share about Confidence, Humility, Results, & Relationships

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival is a celebratory finish line of the Winning Well International Symposium with themes of confidence, humility, results, and relationships. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors! Next month’s Frontline Festival is all about handling conflict in your team. Submit your relevant blog posts by June 9 here!

 

CONFIDENCE

If you have no confidence in self, you are twice defeated in the race of life.  Marcus Garvey

John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement discusses why the lack of confidence is more problematic than having confidence. Building a Great Software Development Team    Follow John.

Robyn McLeod of Thoughtful Leaders Blog shares that building our self-respect strengthens confidence and allows us to be more open to feedback. Why Self-respect is a Key Leadership Skill  Follow Robyn.

HUMILITY

Do you wish to rise? Begin by descending. You plan a tower that will pierce the clouds? Lay first the foundation of humility.  Augustine

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership explores the virtue of humility as a leader. Don’t Worry About Being Humble, Just Do It  Follow Wally.

Skip Prichard of Leadership Insights leads us in discovering a unique leadership lesson in humility from Pope Francis. You’ll find 12 leadership lessons from the Vatican. Lead With Humility: 12 Lessons from Pope Francis.    Follow Skip.

RESULTS

The achievements of an organization are the results of the combined effort of each individual. Vince Lombardi

David Grossman of The Grossman Group tells his story of self-discovery and stresses the value of leaders living authentically so you can be your best self, motivate your teams, and get results by showing leaders how to bring your best to work and bring out the best in others.  Respectful Authenticity    Follow David.

Artika Tyner of Planting People Growing Justice Leadership Institute shares 5 key lessons on how to achieve results in your business and professional development. 5 Lessons on Business Success from the American Small Business Champion TrainingFollow Artika.

Note: We’d like to congratulate Dr. Tyner and the Planting People Growing Justice organization on the national recognition as an American Small Business Champion!

Sean Glaze of Great Results Teambuilding  talks about the problem with getting results and buy-in on many teams is that mission statements stay on the walls. It never makes it into the hearts and minds of the people working together to establish a relationship between what they DO and what they are helping to accomplish.  How Many Mission Statements Does Your Team Have?  Follow Sean.

Hiro Taylor of HeroPay Starting knows starting a small business can be hard. When the times get tough remember these words of wisdom, from some of the most successful people of the last century. Keep your eyes on the prize – in business and in life. 10 Motivational Quotes Every Small Business Owner Should Read Follow Hiro.

RELATIONSHIPS

Trust is the glue of life. It’s the foundational principle that holds all relationships. Stephen Covey

Mike Kappel of Patriot Software, LLC  When it comes to leading a team to success, relationships are key. For top results, leaders need to know how to connect with the workforces they manage. How to Be a Team Player in a Leadership Role   Follow Mike.

Susan Mazza of Random Acts of Leadership.  offers her thoughts on why connection fuel progress, and is the source for progress that is both meaningful and satisfying. We sacrifice that progress when we don’t consciously take the time to just talk to each other — human to human — and take the time to connect meaningfully. 3 Reasons Why Connecting is Essential to Progress    Follow Susan.

Tanveer Naseer of Tanveer Naseer Leadership talks about how a leader’s ability to build relationships with their employees is fast becoming a critical key to their success. Learn about 3 strategies to help with this.  3 Keys For Building Relationships With Those You Lead  Follow Tanveer.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited reminds us that there is an “I” in teamwork and helps us assess whether we are a good team player.  There is an “I” in Team  Follow Beth.

Jesse Stoner of Seapoint Center for Collaborative Leadership  shares a personal experience of bridging the divide.  This is the story of how my brother and I came to terms with our differences and what I learned about how to bridge the divide.  Dialogue Bridges the Divide    Follow Jesse.

 

 

 

 

Development

Frontline Festival: Leaders Share about Growth and Change

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival is all about growth and change. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors! Next month’s Frontline Festival corresponds to the Winning Well International Symposium. We will run the Frontline Festival as our closing post for the symposium, the week of May 22.  Please share your best blog post that correlates with one of the four Winning Well principles: Confidence, Humility, Results, or Relationships.  Submit your item here by May 15.

Susan Mazza of Random Acts of Leadership shares that understanding your typical personal style of leadership can help you grow as a leader, by guiding your approach to the three fundamental acts of leadership  Speaking Up, Stepping Up, and Standing Up Follow Susan.

Lisa Kohn from Thoughtful Leaders Blog practices Positive Psychology, and is working to be more consistent in its application of the tools and mindsets, and also more equipped to guide clients through it. Get Serious About Your Growth  Follow Lisa.

John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement gives us ways to focus on growing and changing. Our culture seems to encourage the superficial and new even when, as it so often does, it mainly amounts to fooling oneself.  The Road Not Taken    Follow John.

The quality of a leader is reflected in the standards they set for themselves.  Ray Kroc

Rachel Blakely of Patriot Software, LLC  advises that as a small business owner, your company will experience huge benefits when you develop leadership skills. Eight Tips for Growing as Leader in Business.  Follow Rachel.

David Grossman of The Grossman Group is focused on leading with respectful authenticity. The Secret Respectfully Authentic Leaders Know. Follow David.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership says leading change in an organization is a lot like pouring coffee in a restaurant. You can learn a lot from a professional waiter. Change and the Gentle Pour.   Follow Wally.

Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other.  John F. Kennedy

Skip Prichard of Leadership Insights is focused on growth to increase my creative side. Many of us don’t think of ourselves as creative – not only are there many types of creativity – but all of us can use hacks to increase our creativity. 23 Hacks to Boost Your Creativity.  Follow Skip.

Chip Bell of ChipBell.com comments: After watching Will Smith in the new movie Collateral Beauty I want to pay more attention to and value the details of my experiences and be more in the moment.  I am an overachiever (a trait I like) and try to maximize productivity (a trait I also like).  But I too often miss the beauty of the cardinal outside my office window or the amaryllis starting to bloom or the pain on the face of the guy who picks up my garbage each week.  I need to remember to ask him a question about his life and thank him for his work.  Follow Chip.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited provides a list of 10 Apps, Tools and Resources for Your Professional Development and Inspiration. Follow Beth.

Hold yourself responsible to a higher standard than anybody expects of you. Never excuse yourself.  Henry Ward Beecher

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates suggests walking a labyrinth to learn leadership discipline. Follow Shelley

According to Sean Glaze of Great Results Teambuilding leaders have a tremendous impact on their organization because the phrases they share with their teams can either produce distrust and apathy or ignite passion and commitment. Follow Sean.

Visme.com contributed the following leadership infographic by Gordon Tredgold of GordonTredgold.com which provides a compilation of 20 Habits of unsuccessful leaders.  Follow Visme.  Follow Gordon. 12 Exalting Phrases Good Leaders Share with their Team.  Follow Sean.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frontline Festival: Leaders Share Team Building Ideas

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival is all about team time. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors! Next month’s Frontline Festival follows up on this month’s with a theme all about growth and change. The question for the month is:  What is an area of growth you are focusing on, either professionally or personally? Submit your growth and change related blog posts and answers to that question here!

This month’s question was: What tips do you have for working well with a team?

A sense of teamwork is crucial for a productive small business staff. Try steps for leaders to take for building teamwork in the workplace from Amanda Cameron of Patriot Software, LLC Follow Amanda.

If you find yourself on a dysfunctional team, or just want to get a new team off to a great start, ask yourself the following three questions from Susan Mazza of Random Acts of Leadership. You may discover that your team is nothing more than a committee in disguise. If so, now you’ll know exactly how to correct course.Follow Susan.

Skip Prichard of Leadership Insights gives us 10 strategies to help make a team work well together. They are derived by Dennis Perkins who studied the incredible survivor story of the Midnight Rambler and the storm that almost destroyed everything. Follow Skip.

Part of developing a team that works well together is developing the individual skills of people. A bigger part of it is developing an understanding of the system within which those people must operate and adjusting that system to the people on the team.  Too much time is devoted to changing people to fit into the constraints of the existing system and too little to changing the existing system to take advantage of individuals on the team now. Thanks, John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement Follow John.

Building product is not about having a large team to manage. It is about having a small team with the right people on it. ~ Fred Wilson

Jesse Stoner of Seapoint Center for Collaborative Leadership asks, “How many teams have you been on that came to an official end?” If you’re like most people, it’s not too many. That’s because teams seem to take on a life of their own, even after their initial purpose has been fulfilled or no longer makes sense. Here’s how to tell when it’s time to close down a teamFollow Jesse.

Tanveer Naseer of Tanveer Naseer Leadership   helps us learn about three tactics successful leaders use to build thriving teams that can adapt to the changing needs of their organization.  Follow Tanveer.

Robyn McLeod of Thoughtful Leaders Blog notes that at times, the way a team is set up and work gets done, can cause a team to be more at odds than pulling together. But with four simple tips – as simple as reducing conflicting goals – you can help your team work as one rather than against each other.   Follow Robyn.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership reminds us that most of us do most of our work in teams. Here are four important things you should know that make a core work team effective. Follow Wally.

Great things in business are never done by one person. They’re done by a team of people. ~ Steve Jobs

Chris Edmonds of Driving Results through Culture shares an important exercise you can do with your team to help them write their unique story in “Nurture Your Team’s Narrative.” Follow Chris.

Julie Winkle Giulioni of DesignArounds shares the 10 Top Trust Terminators that will break down teamwork. Follow Julie

Chery Gegelman of Simply Understanding tells the story of an under-performing team that was feeling victimized but changed their focus, learned how to play together, built trust, began exceeding their goals and instigated organizational development projects throughout the company.  (When we create workplaces that encourage people to use their imaginations and to laugh, we will increase energy, teamwork and results!) Follow Chery.

Alli Polin of Break the Frame  shares that the best leaders know that teamwork is a dance between individual strength and team capacity. Skills matter, but team members must have each other’s back, consistently give their personal best and learn how to play well with others too. Follow Alli.

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates shares some ways to increase participation in your team. Follow Shelley

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited acknowledges that sometimes, team building starts by looking at ourselvesFollow Beth.

The main ingredient of stardom is the rest of the team. ~ John Wooden

 

 

team

Frontline Festival: Leaders Give Pointers on Creating Connection

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival is all about creating connection. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors! Next month’s Frontline Festival follows up on this month’s with a theme all about team time. The question for the month is:  What practical tips do you have for working well with a team and building a sense of teamwork?? Submit your teamwork related blog posts and answers to that question here!

Amanda Cameron of Patriot Software, LLC explains the importance of promoting teamwork in an organization and the positive results that can be achieved through creating connection. Learn the benefits of a team that works together, tips for encouraging teamwork, and how Patriot Software uses unique methods to connect team members. Follow Amanda.

According to David Grossman of The Grossman Group great leaders don’t just manage employees; they make sure employees are motivated, engaged and inspired when coming to work. There are a number of ways this can be done, from asking open-ended questions to create dialogue and being a role model, to recognizing employees for doing their job. More on these, and 7 other ways to engage and connect with employees here.  Follow David.

David Chaudron of Organized Change  recalls that Traditional Management theory had managers dictating work and assigning tasks to workers. Today we know that an engaged employee is more productive and has more to offer than completing assigned tasked. 360 Feedback systems connect the loop for communication and engagement Follow David.

According to William Steiner of Executive Coaching Concepts, your ability to connect with others is directly related to your ability to demonstrate empathy for them.  This post talks about key elements for you to make an empathetic connection and some key “Don’ts” that could hijack your efforts.Follow William.

Communication, the human connection, is the key to personal and career success. ~ Paul J. Meyer

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership shares the most important single thing you can do to create connections and start conversations. Follow Wally.

Jesse Lyn Stoner of Seapoint Center for Collaborative Leadership reminds us that identifying team values are a great way to create team connection. But if it’s not done right, it can actually create discord, as this short story shows. This post also includes 6 questions to ensure your team values unite your team. Follow Jesse Lyn.

John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement believes it is important to focus on creating a shared connection to working together.  He advises that we seek to provide people an opportunity to take pride in their work.  With intrinsic motivation for being proud of the work that naturally encourages people to work together.  Artificial “bonding” outside of the context of work mostly doesn’t translate to the work environment and therefore is not where we should focus.Follow John.

David Dye of Trailblaze tells us that one of the most powerful opportunities you have to connect with your team – is when things go wrong. David shares how you can Own the Ugly and show them they can trust you. Follow David.

Loneliness is proof that your innate search for connection is intact. ~ Martha Beck

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates knows that connection and motivation can go hand in hand. Using brain science, she provides five ways to motivate your team. Follow Shelley

Alli Polin of Break the Frame   observes that teams are increasingly decentralized and leaders are challenged to create connection when face to face interaction is infrequent at best. She provides a guide to help leaders facilitate success in the age of virtual teams. Follow Alli.

Lisa Kohn from Thoughtful Leaders Blog shares a challenge that teams sometimes face. It’s the amount of work that needs to get done, and the tendency to “dump” work from one person to another. When team members find ways to work together to solve a joint problem or issue, the dumping often lessens or stops, but sometimes getting together isn’t that easy to do. She gives a few suggestions on how to do it. Follow Lisa.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited recognizes that in order to foster strong team relationships, sometimes you need to apologize. She gives some pointers on how to apologize well. Follow Beth.

The business of business is relationships; the business of life is human connection. ~ Robin S. Sharma

Jon Mertz of Thin Difference reflects that creating a connection between members of any team requires trust. To recover from our current trust depression, we need to reexamine some of our decades-old thought patterns and rethink our assumptions. With new information and updated analysis, we can craft plans to help employees and partners while building trust in the process. Follow Jon.

Chris Edmonds of Driving Results through Culture   reminds us that creating  authentic care–a genuine connection  where team members like and trust each other-takes time, energy, and consistency. A bowling event or a trust fall exercise won’t have long term benefits unless the experience can be quickly tied to daily challenges the team faces. In his post, “Most Teambuilding Isn’t,” he proposes a proven path to helping create trust and respect across a team. Follow Chris.

Goals

Frontline Festival: Leaders Share Goal Setting Strategies for their Teams (and Themselves)

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival is all about goal setting (especially with your team) for the new year. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors! Next month’s Frontline Festival is all about creating connection. The question for the month is:  What have you done to create connection with your team? Submit your teamwork related blog posts and answers to that question here!

Jon Verbeck of JonVerbeck.com suggests that you set five shorter term quarterly goals with the correct specific numeric targets. Ensure the goals are aligned with the overall purpose and strategy of your organization.  Discuss the goals and objectives frequently as a group and be relentless in the pursuit of accomplishing them. Follow Jon.

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates gives a simple plan for following through on your important goalsFollow Shelley

Willy Steiner of Executive Coaching Concepts  shares five key steps to setting key goals along with some examples and motivational ideas. Follow William.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited is focusing on habits for herself and her team, rather than lofty goals. Regular weekly routines and consistent communication with team members move the needle for all of their connected businesses. Follow Beth.

According to Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership, here’s why you need a system to make sure your goals drive your behavior.  Follow Wally.

David Dye of Trailblaze shares a twist with Nine Ways to Motivate Employees when You Don’t Set the Goals. Follow David.

Nothing can stop the man with the right mental attitude from achieving his goal; nothing on earth can help the man with the wrong mental attitude. – Thomas Jefferson

Chris Edmonds of Driving Results through Culture encourages teams to spend time not only on goals, but even more importantly on writing values into an organizational constitution as a strong foundation for an effective and productive culture. Follow Chris.

Julie Winkle Giulioni of DesignArounds shares that BUY-IN represents more than an emotional connection to a goal.  It also reminds leaders of the five critical components of goal setting that must be incorporated into planning, conversations, and actions to help teams deliver optimal results. Follow Julie

John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement  shares, “In general I believe goals are counter-productive.  To the extent they are useful they guide decision-making about what is valued and what type of improvements to aim for (incremental improvement or try to find a very different way of doing things).  As Mike Tveite says:  “I achieved my goal but not my aim.”  That happens a lot–we honestly translate aims to goals. And then we do stupid things in the name of the goal get it the way of the aim. We forget the aim sometimes and put the goal in its place.” Follow John.

Desire is the key to motivation, but it’s determination and commitment to an unrelenting pursuit of your goal – a commitment to excellence – that will enable you to attain the success you seek. – Mario Andretti

According to Susan Mazza of Random Acts of Leadership, to do lists can easily transform from a useful tool to stay focused and productive to an ever-present reminder of all that you are not getting done. Here are two tips to help you and your team replace the tyranny of “too much to do” with the immense satisfaction of doing the things that matter most. Follow Susan.

According to Robyn McLeod of Thoughtful Leaders Blog, there are many best practices to setting meaningful team goals, and especially at this time of year, suggestions on how to do that proliferate. An essential first step is to focus first on “being” not “doing”; grounding ourselves; being present to what is; and moving forward with intention and purpose. Follow Robyn.

Jon Mertz of Thin Difference asks: Are you acting on the change you wish to see in yourself, your workplace, and your community? To achieve real change, no wall can exist between intention and action. It’s the interaction between these two that enables new habits to stick. Follow Jon.

You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream. – Les Brown

Skip Prichard of Leadership Insights says that one of the most important aspects of setting goals is understanding individual and group motivation. The why behind the goal is often more important than the goal itself. Follow Skip.

 

The discipline you learn and character you build from setting and achieving a goal can be more valuable than the achievement of the goal itself. – Bo Bennett

John Thurlbeck of Wear Consulting shares a method for making SMARTER goals, a successful and proven model he has used in leading teams over the years. Follow John. 

Michelle Cubas, CPCC, ACC, of Positive Potentials, LLC  shares how to simplify your strategic planning with a basic project management tool—a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS). Let it be your compass for the coming year. Follow Michelle.

 

We’ve been making the rounds speaking a great deal on setting clear goals and expectations and accelerating your performance. Here’s a postcard from a recent keynote.

 

Frontline Festival: Leaders Share How They and Their Team are Preparing for the New Year

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival is all about preparing for 2017. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors! Next month’s Frontline Festival is all about goal setting.  Please submit your very best links to your goal setting posts. The question for the month is: “What your best practice for helping teams set meaningful goals?” Submit your answers and blog posts related to this question: here!

Jon Mertz of Thin Difference tells us that preparing is more than an act of getting ready or having a fixed plan. Preparing is creating the proper conditions to act more fully in the change we desire. Follow Jon.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership suggests that we forget resolutions. Concentrate on what you will DO differently. Follow Wally.

Michelle Cubas, CPCC, ACC, of Positive Potentials, LLC offers a post, “Loose Ends and Promises”, outlining some thoughts about the transition to a new year. Follow Michelle.

The best preparation for tomorrow is doing your best today.
~ H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

From David Dye: In Winning Well we emphasize the importance of Committing with Clarity: mutually shared, clear commitments are the backbone of breakthrough results and healthy relationships. To that end, one way we’re preparing our team for 2017 is to create a playbook – a one-stop guide to the critical goals, messages, and activities of each strategic theme. It creates alignment, ensures we’re all focused on the same goals, and helps us to move faster. Follow David.

Chris Edmonds of Driving Results through Culture  says:  I’m a solopreneur – but I have some fine players in my “band.” (Bear with me – I’m a working musician on the side.) My publicity pro is amazing. My virtual assistant is brilliant. I’m doing more proactive strategic planning with my publicity pro with monthly calls so we can stay on top of trends and news-jacking opportunities that arise quickly. My goal for 1Q 2017 is to decide what my extremely capable VA can do more of – so I can do less of that and more content creation, writing, and marketing. Only if I trust these players more – and delegate more – can we do more for leaders, companies, and communities in the months to come. Follow Chris.

Eileen McDargh of The Energizer  shares: There are three people on my team: me, myself, and I. If I can get those three people in sync, then I can manage the other people who support me. I take myself away for three days on a silent retreat. I hike, write, and journal ideas. I meditate. I listen deeply. In the stillness that surrounds me, I come away refreshed. I don’t always have great breakthroughs and that’s ok too. The silence centers me because the rest of the year, I will be surrounded by the spoken word. Follow Eileen

Great things in business are never done by one person. They’re done by a team of people.
~ Steve Jobs

Michelle Pallas of MichellePallas.com encourages us to understand ourselves, from all perspectives, before taking on something new. Follow Michelle.

Becky Robinson of Weaving Influence is preparing her team for 2017 by reflecting about and sharing wins from 2016 while setting goals and priorities for 2017. We’re all excited to launch a new website in the first quarter of 2017, which will more clearly reflect our company’s unique offer in the market while showcasing our authors/speakers. As we work on the website, we’re setting the stage for our best year ever.  Follow Becky.

William Steiner of Executive Coaching Concepts  says his team is cleaning up all contact files so our communications can be cleaner and more strategically targeted.  They are also going to have a nice party in January to celebrate the publishing of his new book, which was a collaborative, group effort.  Follow William.

Every day brings new choices.
~ Martha Beck

John Thurlbeck of Wear Consulting is reviewing how he did on goals in 2016 and setting goals for 2017 using Michael Hyatt’s Best Year Ever model. Follow John. 

Dr. Artika Tyner of the Planting People. Growing Justice Institute is preparing her team for 2017 by focusing on their brand. She feels this will serve as the foundation for developing new products and services while also holding the team accountable for clearly conveying their brand purpose and consistently delivering their best. Follow Artika.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited has a unique arrangement — she has a small team  of colleagues that help her provide virtual assistance, and she is ON more than team, providing virtual assistance. One of her hopes for the new year is that she cultivate herself and her own colleagues in such a way that the clients HOPE serves feel like the only team HOPE is on–is theirs. Follow Beth.

Cheers to a new year and another chance for us to get it right.
~ Oprah Winfrey
Thanks

Frontline Festival: Questions of Thanksgiving and Gratitude

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival is all about giving thanks at work. We asked contributors to share three areas they are most grateful for at work. But before we go there… how about you? What are you most thankful for at work? 

As we approach Thanksgiving in the United States, during a time of unrest for much of America, I invite you to take a deep breath and reflect. What are you most grateful for at work? And if your answer is a who, why not take a moment to tell them?

  • Who has inspired you to be more than you ever thought possible?
  • What challenges have you faced that transformed you in ways you never dreamed of?
  • What have you been able to contribute that’s made an impact you’re proud of?
  • What opportunities have you been given to stretch and grow?
  • Who pushed you past your comfort zone?
  • Who are your key collaborators and what do you most appreciate about their approach?

Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors! Next month’s Frontline Festival is all about preparing your team for the new year.   Submit your blog posts and answers related to this question: What are you doing to prepare your team for 2017? here!

Now on to our festival of thankfulness:

I am grateful for what I am and have. My thanksgiving is perpetual.
~ Henry David Thoreau

Dr. Artika Tyner of the Planting People. Growing Justice Institute believes gratitude will determine your organization’s altitude. She is thankful for receiving the blessing of the vision for Planting People Growing Justice, their team of visionary leaders, and the thousands of community members who are advancing the shared vision of #LeadershipforSocialJustice. Follow Artika.  

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates is thankful for the opportunity to get to know and learn from a wide variety of people. Because she work with many different groups and she interviews them in advance, she learns about their industry and she learns leadership and management tips.  It’s a great way to stay fresh and interested in others. Follow Shelley

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited is thankful for a successful first full year completely on her own in business, the freedom and flexibility owning a business offers, and the consistent opportunity it affords to learn and grow as a leader and person. Follow Beth.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership is thankful for the amazing men and women who are his clients and who make it possible for him to make a living doing something he loves to do. Follow Wally.

Michelle Cubas, CPCC, ACC, of Positive Potentials, LLC says that “In a world of chaos, gratitude is my go-to place for comfort.” Follow Michelle.

David Dye of Trailblaze is thankful to work with amazing people to make the world a better place; to see people become their best version of themselves; to be around people – friends, colleagues, partners, encouragers. Follow David.

Chris Edmonds of Driving Results through Culture lists: business owners and leaders who engage in creating purposeful, positive, productive work cultures; my “business band,” the players of EXCEPTIONAL EXPERTISE & GRACE that help keep my brand crisp, clear, and relevant every day; my family and friends who laugh at my jokes, hug back, and push me to be better every day. Follow Chris.

David Grossman of The Grossman Group states that “2016 has been a year of growth and learning.”  He’s grateful for his clients who express a willingness to grow and go places they never thought possible; his amazing team who put their hearts, heads, and guts into their work every day and Thanksgiving tradition: the Annual Celebration of Grandma Elsie, Her Famous #PumpkinChiffonPie & Other Recipes Follow David.

Be thankful for what you have; you’ll end up having more. If you concentrate on what you don’t have, you will never, ever have enough.
~ Oprah Winfrey

Chip Bell of the Chip Bell Group is grateful for:  1. Passion–a wonderful gift from the Almighty 2. Weaving Influence for making me look important  3. Granddaughters for reminding me what is important  Follow Chip.

John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement  is thankful to be able to work remotely and make a living doing what he enjoys and believes provides value to his clients. Follow John.

Paula Kiger of Big Green Pen shares that having been forced by life events to be home with an elderly and infirm relative, she is thankful that our current professional world provides opportunities to work flexibly. She’s grateful that technology helps us do our work more quickly, with less error, and finally for the people who make the work worth doing! Follow Paula.

Lisa Kohn from Thoughtful Leaders Blog expresses her thanks for 1) Witnessing clients growing and evolving (and having fun along the way); 2) Learning from clients and colleagues and 3) getting to do what I love and absolutely believe in. Follow Lisa.

If you are really thankful, what do you do? You share.
~ W. Clement Stone

Eileen McDargh of The Energizer shares “The first wealth is health. Love trumps hate. Meaningful work exudes gratitude.” Follow Eileen

Fun at work

Frontline Festival: Leaders Share about Having Fun

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival is all about having fun.  Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors! Next month’s Frontline Festival is all about giving thanks.  Submit your ideas here!

Chip Bell of the Chip Bell Group finds fun in his surroundings such as a happy office with great music, quirky artifacts, awesome pictures, a gazillion books, and a cat that sleeps on the copier nearby.  The panoramic view of the lake 75 feet away also helps! Follow Chip

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited treats herself each week by making sure her weekend starts no later than 1:00pm on Fridays (her commitment to a regular bowling league also helps). She offers this fun puzzle game for teams who work at an office together.  Follow Beth.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership observes that when people say that work is “fun” they usually don’t mean it’s a party or a game. They’re talking about grown-up fun. Follow Wally.

Even though you are growing up, you should never stop having fun.
~ Nina Dobrev

Michelle Cubas, CPCC, ACC, of Positive Potentials, LLC  advises that in today’s stressful work environment, fun must be baked into our workflow to offer comic relief. Leaders must encourage humor and positive expression to slice through the thick veil of cynicism and stress. Follow Michelle.

David Dye of Trailblaze advises we start by finding the fun in the everyday. Build from there – as a team leader, I scheduled regular (and sometimes surprise) opportunities for people to let their hair down and have fun. We would go bowling, I would personally cook everyone a holiday breakfast, or I’d put together fun team-focused city-wide scavenger hunts. (Note: do these things when people are being paid – it usually doesn’t work to ask them to leave their family to have ‘fun’).  Follow David.

Chris Edmonds of Driving Results through Culture shares, “As a solopreneur, I can easily find myself writing, consulting with clients, etc. eight hours a day (or ten)! I’ve learned to schedule time for exercise (walking at 8400 feet is a treat – even in 2′ of snow), trap shooting down the hill in Denver (my daughter still beats me), regular lunches with my #DenverTweeps colleagues, and learning new music for upcoming Brian Raine band gigs @BrianRaineBand). Diversity of experiences is a must! Follow Chris.

Life is too important to be taken seriously.
~ Oscar Wilde

Lisa Kohn from Thoughtful Leaders Blog reminds us that in order to help your team, or family or anyone, have fun, you have to make fun a priority. You have to look for reasons to smile and to laugh, to maybe have a few toys or games hanging around for moments of levity, and to schedule “light time” and breaks especially in times of the most intensity and stress. Follow Lisa.

Paul LaRue of The UPwards Leader, says that being able to cook and serve his teams has been a huge blessing to them and to him. Nothing says thank you more than taking the time to make a breakfast or lunch out of a busy schedule for the team. They truly appreciate it and it always puts a smile on his face too!  Follow Paul.

Eileen McDargh of The Energizer muses, To rise and leave a desk. To walk outside and down to the bluff overlooking the beach. To play with a dog. To feed the birds. Nature nurtures. Follow Eileen

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates gives thought to what to do when our brain wilts. Learning to recognize the signs and counteract with refreshing space for yourself (and your team) is important.  Follow Shelley

 
Today was good. Today was fun. Tomorrow is another one.
~ Dr. Seuss

Next month’s question: What are three things you are thankful for when it comes to your business? Submit your ideas here!

Quote source: Brainyquote

 

 

August Frontline Festival: Leaders Share Tips about Productive Work Spaces

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival gives tips about setting up a productive work space. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors!

Next month’s Frontline Festival is all about communication tips.  There are two ways to participate…either submit a blog post on the topic, or your 1-2 sentence answer to the question. Click here to participate! Now on to our topic for August:

Chip Bell of the Chip Bell Group says that everything he needs is within arms length of the desk (printer, work table, copier, scanner, large computer monitor, supplies (like scissors, stabler, rubber stamps, paper clips), speakers for music, etc. His office looks out over a gorgeous lake and his floor to ceiling book cases sit six feet from the desk. Follow Chip.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited has the following elements in her home office, the main “headquarters” for her VA and business soft skill business: stand up desk with monitor exactly mirroring the one at the sit down desk, screen behind her chair at sit down desk for a backdrop for video calls and recordings, chair for relaxed reading, and a number of items with the word HOPE on them as decor. She also has a small fountain, candle, succulents and other items throughout to create a pleasant atmosphere in the office. Follow Beth.

Michelle Cubas, CPCC, ACC, of Positive Potentials, LLC  shares that productivity is the result of an open mind and energy working together. Where we work has enormous influence over our attitude toward what we’re doing. Consider how you can change your energy by being inspired in your surroundings by taking a look at this post.  Follow Michelle.

Eric Dingler of EricDingler.com  keeps his physical and virtual space free of all clutter.  He has an inbox that everything goes in.  Once a day, he clears it following the GTD system.  He also uses the free version of Nozbe to keep himself on track and clutter free.  When he leaves his office, he has zero emails in his inbox and nothing in his physical inbox, so he leaves work free and walks in prepared and ahead. Follow Eric.

David Dye of Trailblaze finds natural light to be a key to productivity. He will turn off florescents and use desk lamps if sunlight isn’t available. Being surrounded by an aquarium, plants and living things also humanizes and relaxes him, helping him maintain perspective. Follow David.

Chris Edmonds of Driving Results through Culture finds that having a clear surface area (no matter where he’s working—his office desk or at a desk on the road somewhere) is most helpful in keeping him focused on the task at hand. Papers on his desk for needed tasks “talk to him.” Those stacks yell “Do me first!” Remove those piles and he can work his plan without distractions. Follow Chris.

Technology can be our best friend, and technology can also be the biggest party pooper of our lives. It interrupts our own story, interrupts our ability to have a thought or a daydream, to imagine something wonderful, because we’re too busy bridging the walk from the cafeteria back to the office on the cell phone.

~ Steven Spielberg

Mike Henry of MikeHenrySr.com says that his work space must be distraction free. When he is doing work he enjoys, distractions are less of a problem. But when he is doing something that isn’t very interesting, he needs to focus and can be easily distracted.  Follow Mike.

John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement  really enjoys living as a digital nomad and having workspaces like the one here. He admits that the setup isn’t one that optimizes productivity though it can be energizing, inspiring and motivating, and that the “digital nomad” lifestyle isn’t for everyone.  His setup is just a Macbook Pro  (he also had an iPad mini to tether if he needed to use a cell phone signal to access the Internet) all of which allows him to work from just about anywhere. Follow John.

Paula Kiger of Perspicacity  finds that despite having a lot of technology in her work space, it’s her paper notebook with information like passwords written in it that often saves the day! Follow Paula.

Lisa Kohn from Thoughtful Leaders Blog  has found that one of the most important factors to consider when setting up her work space is what inspires her and makes her smile. She is most productive when surrounded by beauty and most creative when in a spot that pulls her out of her usual space and therefore out of her usual mindset.  For example, when she writes, she never sits at her desk. A coffee shop or her couch at home works better. When not on the phone, she works outdoors as much as possible, such as on a side porch at home.  Follow Lisa.

Melissa Lamson of Lamson Consulting suggests making your workspace your own. Decorate it. Create a safe, comfortable, calm space. Follow Melissa

I’m quite an untidy person in a lot of ways. But order makes me happy. I have to have a clear desk and a tidy desktop, with as few visual distractions as possible. I don’t mind sound distractions, but visual ones freak me out.
~ Joanne Harris

According to Don Maruska of DonMaruska.com, it’s important to create opportunities for a worker to have only their most important task in front of them while working on it. Multi-tasking is inefficient and stressful. Follow Don.

Eileen McDargh of The Energizer shares her philosophy:  A place for everything and everything in its place. With light bright surroundingss, flowers, pictures of friends, and equipment hidden from view, I feel productive and free. Follow Eileen

Andy Oziemblo of Cubicle Concepts suggests that  some of the biggest gains in productivity and individual motivation can be achieved through the use of modern office designs. The use of ergonomically optimum seating, height adjustable tables, and movement inducing treadmill workstations can help one attain many health benefits along with increased oxygen in your blood. Increased oxygen in your blood allows for better focus and mental production output. To spur motivation, choose work space artwork and colors that give inspiration as well as drive you towards set goals. Follow Andy.

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates shares tips for minimizing workspace and personal distractions in her post, Stop Draining Your AttentionFollow Shelley

Dr. Artika Tyner of the Planting People. Growing Justice Institute advises to create a vision board which visually reflects your goals and desired business outcomes. Post your vision board in your office as a daily reminder of your goals and progress in reaching your dreams. Follow Artika.

On my desk I have three screens, synchronized to form a single desktop. I can drag items from one screen to the next. Once you have that large display area, you’ll never go back, because it has a direct impact on productivity.
~ Bill Gates

Quote source: Brainyquote.com

Frontline Festival: Leaders Share Ideas about How to Take a Break

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival gives tips about taking a break from work. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors!

Next month’s Frontline Festival is all about productivity-enhancing workspaces.  There are two ways to participate…either submit a blog post on the topic, or your 1-2 sentence answer to the question. Click here to participate! Now on to our topic for July:

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited makes it a practice to take a break every week by planning her workflow to avoid work on weekends. Her goal is to have all business work done by noon on Fridays, using a Friday afternoon bowling league as a marker for the start of the weekend mindset. Saturdays and Sundays are reserved for other healthy pursuits like fellowship with her husband and friends, exercise, church, reading, etc. with occasional non-business-related projects sprinkled in. Follow Beth.

Chip Bell of the Chip Bell Group  is inspired by Truett Cathy, founder of Chick-fil-A, who wrote “Fall in love with what you do and you will never work another day in your life.” Chip says: “My brother retired a few years ago and hunts almost every day.  I asked him when he was going to retire from hunting (he has two full freezers of venison and wild turkey). Even when vacationing in foreign countries, I spend the first hour of every day doing what I love–working!”  Follow Chip.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership shares that we call short periods of downtime “breaks.” We call longer periods “time off” or “vacation” in his post, “Take a Break.”  Follow Wally.

According to Michelle Cubas, CPCC, ACC, of Positive Potentials, LLC, the old saying of “live to eat or eat to live” attempts to temper our appetites. She contends we exchange the word “eat” for “work” to see where the American culture heads when it comes to work. Follow Michelle.

The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.
~ Saint Augustine

Eric Dingler of EricDingler.com   places blocks of time on his weekly calendar that can be moved around, but not deleted.  One of these blocks is “day off.” Another daily approach is 30-minutes of “me time,” which he always adjusts his alarm clock to accommodate.  Follow Eric.

Chris Edmonds of Driving Results through Culture tells about a time his family created great shared memories, and ties it in to how similar activities can help your workplace culture. Follow Chris.

David Grossman of The Grossman Group has mastered how to leave email at the office when on vacation, and shares six steps to help you do the sameFollow David.

For Mike Henry of MikeHenrySr.com the breaks come when he can focus on being with people face-to-face. Maybe it is time with his wife discussing our future, or time playing with his grand children, or talking with his Mom or having breakfast with a friend. Focusing on people takes him out of the tasks and To Do lists and lets him freeze time to focus on someone else, and their needs and interests.  Follow Mike.

John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement  thinks vacations and breaks are so important that he has designed his life so that they are a built in part of his normal process, Financial Independence Retire Early (FIRE) and Location Independent Working. He has also enjoyed vacations at national parks and shares photos here.  He also finds that weekly vigorous exercise (like basketball) helps keep him in a good frame of mind. Follow John.

Laughter is an instant vacation.
~ Milton Berle

According to Paula Kiger of Perspicacity so many of us get caught up in the web of being available 24/7, especially when it comes to our electronics. When I did a silent retreat, I took a forced break from that habit and was reminded of the power of turning everything off, even briefly. Follow Paula.

Paul LaRue of The UPwards Leader asks: How does a leader make vacation meaningful and refreshing? By following these tips leading up to itFollow Paul.

Eileen McDargh of The Energizer reminds us that the American work ethic may not be ethical.  Studies have found that while most Americans would choose more vacation time over a higher salary, the reality is that we don’t take advantage of time off. Follow Eileen

Robyn McLeod of Thoughtful Leaders Blog  presents Why stepping away may be your best leadership move yet. Taking a break gives you the opportunity to rethink your current approaches, making time for the pursuits you love, and committing to more thoughtful and intentional actions once you return.  Follow Robyn.

The ant is knowing and wise, but he doesn’t know enough to take a vacation.
~ Clarence Day

Learn about four reasons why taking vacation breaks can help us to become a more effective leader for our team and organization. Thanks, Tanveer Naseer of Tanveer Naseer Leadership  Follow Tanveer.

Molly Page of Thin Difference  asks, “Do you ever feel like you’re too valuable to your business to take time off? Here are three reasons to set your mind at ease and schedule a break.” Follow Molly.

The number one thing that helps Julie Pierce of Valley Creek Church unplug when she’s on vacation is deleting the apps that keep her connected with work. That way she’s not tempted to check email or project boards. She justs re-install them the day I return to the office. Follow Julie.

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates has found that miniature breaks by simply closing her eyes are very helpful and enhance her leadership. Follow Shelley

John Thurlbeck of Wear Consulting says, “I have this perfectly balanced – in favor of vacations! Why? We all need to remember we are not invincible, nor irreplaceable, and we are certainly not robots! We need time to think, reflect, recharge and re-connect – with ourselves, our spouses/partners, our families and our friends. Work is an important part of our lives, but it should not be our life! Follow John. 

Quote source: Brainyquote.com

Frontline Festival: Leaders share about favorite apps, technology, and productivity hacks

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival gives tips about favorite tools and technology. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors!

Next month’s Frontline Festival is all about how to take a complete break from work (i.e. for vacation.) There are two ways to participate…either submit a blog post on the topic, or your 1-2 sentence answer to the question. Click here to participate! Now on to our topic for June:

What tools do you use to stay productive?

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited has used the task/recurring task functionality in Microsoft Outlook for many years. She loves how she can set up task reminders to pop up on the appropriate days, can easily change dates to defer tasks, can batch tasks into categories, and can drag an email into task format (this helps keep her in-box clean too.) She also uses Google reminders for the occasional on-the-fly “thing to remember” to pop up at a designated time. Follow Beth

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership  has been tracking his productivity for around fifty years now. Here’s what has worked for him consistently over that half century. Follow Wally.

Michelle Cubas, CPCC, ACC, of Positive Potentials, LLC shares that one of her stress saving tools is Evernote. “This application has a free component and I use it daily. How does it serve me? It puts all my information in one place, easily labeled and organized so I can find it! Follow Michelle.

Productivity is never an accident. It is always the result of a commitment to excellence, intelligent planning, and focused effort.
~ Paul J. Meyer

For David Dye of Trailblaze  Evernote is the first app he installs on a new phone, tablet, or computer. It is an extension of his brain! The other “tool” that helps stay productive: exercise–preferably a good hike in nature. He’s always more productive afterwards. Follow David.

Chris Edmonds of Driving Results through Culture shares: The apps I use daily are proven tools that maintain my sanity and enable promotion of my concepts. They include Nozbe (a cloud-based brilliant task manager), Evernote (a cloud-based “memory enhancer” – for notes, photos, and more), Tweet Jukebox (a terrific quote scheduler that will soon add Facebook and LinkedIn to Twitter posting), Sucuri (website firewall and anti-malware), WPTwin (backs up and restores my various WordPress sites), and SurfEasy (a private VPN that enables safe WiFi use, even in countries where social media is “blocked”!) Here’s a link to learn more about these and other tools I depend on.  Follow Chris

Ariana Friedlander of Rosabella Consulting recommends starting your day by identifying your Big 5 tasks for the day and keep them front and center.  These are the things you need to check off the proverbial list in order to fall asleep knowing you got the important stuff done. Follow Ariana.

I think I have over 60 apps on my iPhone. I use six.
~ Gordon Smith

As an entrepreneur with many projects on the go, Patrick Hankinson of Hello Focus grew frustrated with current tools on the market, finding that none of them really kept his team focused, becoming harder to manage as the team grew. He followed the adage, “Scratch your own itch” and created Hello Focus.  Follow Patrick.

John Hunter of Curious Cat Management   Improvement  has found that taking advantage of all the great ideas among leadership and management bloggers is very important to his continued productivity and success. He feels would be greatly disadvantaged in doing so without an RSS feed reader. Follow John.

Lisa Kohn from Thoughtful Leaders Blog says, “I’m sure that everyone has wonderful tools, apps, and technology to offer that they use to be more productive, but I’ve got something else entirely that is probably my biggest secret and tool. Quietness and meditation. If I forget to find quiet time, if I forget to slow my mind and breathe, if I forget to spend time in peace and meditation, I am simply not as productive. Or as happy. Follow Lisa.

Boundary setting is really a huge part of time management.
~ Jim Loehr

Jennifer Miller of The People Equation  takes the productivity concept of “batching” to the next level with “Theme Days” and explains they can help provide focus and a sense of accomplishment. Follow Jennifer.

Alli Polin of Break the Frame  shares: “Two of my favorite apps that help to manage my productivity are 1) Evernote: I keep everything in there and it’s at my fingertips; and 2) I’m also a huge fan of Rescue Time. You can’t change where you spend your time until you know where it goes. It’s an eye opener!  Follow Alli.

Becky Robinson of Weaving Influence shares “My team uses Basecamp for every project, and using Basecamp helps us stay focused to deliver what we’ve promised. We can easily track progress, find files, and share helpful information with others. We also use Slack for in-the-moment communication and team building. These two apps are critical to our work success.”  Follow Becky.

Each minute is a little thing, and yet, with respect to our personal productivity, to manage the minute is the secret of success.
~ Joseph B. Wirthlin

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates recommends an environment that enhances productivity, with visual and auditory stimulus that aligns with getting things done (it may require headphones.)  Follow Shelley

Dr. Artika Tyner of the Planting People. Growing Justice Institute  finds Hootsuite to be her favorite application, using it to organize her social media life. Follow Artika.

Unless otherwise stated, quotations are sourced from Brainyquote.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Frontline Festival: Leaders share tips about professional development

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival gives tips about professional development for leaders. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors!

Next month’s Frontline Festival is all about favorite apps and technology. What tools do you use to stay productive? There are two ways to participate…either submit a blog post on the topic, or your 1-2 sentence answer to the question. Click here to participate!

This month, we invited leadership experts to either submit a blog post, or answer the following question.

How do you invest in your professional development on a regular basis?

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited commits to finishing one book per month (some take more than one month) and keeping a list. Sticking with this realistic goal has helped her be continuously successful at it for a number of years. She also often listens to podcasts while driving. Follow Beth.

According to Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership you can’t lead others if you can’t lead yourself. Here is a baker’s dozen of things to master to be the best leader you can be. Follow Wally.

As part of her commitment to life-long learning, Michelle Cubas, CPCC, ACC, of Positive Potentials, LLC  makes an effort to learn something new daily.  She finds this is also a terrific way to connect with children, to have them teach the adult something—parent-child, teacher-student. Follow Michelle.

Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.
~ Benjamin Franklin

Mike Henry of MikeHenrySr.com reads and listens to audiobooks. Guess which one he happens to be listening to currently? Thanks for #winningwell Mike!  Follow Mike.

One way John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement continues to learn is by reading posts of bloggers he follows.  Another good way is to write a blog. He shares that he helps you clarify and develop you thinking on topics you are interested in (plus it can build your reputation and potentially help you find work).  Follow John.

Paula Kiger of Big Green Pen has made many connections on social media which inspire her to pursue certain avenues of professional development. She admits it takes follow-through and that there’s no magic (in her opinion) white paper to revolutionize her life. However she has made connections which have made a measurable difference for her.  Follow Paula.

Education is what remains after one has forgotten what one has learned in school.
~ Albert Einstein

Lisa Kohn from Thoughtful Leaders Blog continues to learn and grow by finding thought leaders to add to and challenge her views and knowledge – through reading (articles, online, books) and connecting one-on-one to learn what others are facing and learning. Follow Lisa

Paul LaRue of The UPwards Leader  makes a “To-Be” List for the week and reflects on it daily in conjunction with his “To-Do” List. His “To-Be” List governs the to-do list and helps him stay on track of what behaviors he wants, versus having his tasks define his growth. Follow Paul.

Michelle Pallas of MichellePallas.com advises to stop thinking about professional development as an event! Learning is a part of every day. Leaders learn from mentors, coaches and the people we coach. Coaching is a critical skill and, unless you are an expert, coaching as a competency should be in your personal development plan.   Follow Michelle.

The whole of life, from the moment you are born to the moment you die, is a process of learning.
~ Jiddu Krishnamurti

Skip Prichard of Leadership Insights shares that his leadership as a CEO of a large global company was influenced heavily by his mom, These 9 lessons have been extraordinary to helping me lead. #Winningwell leaders should study these 9 lessons and see their influence increase. Follow Skip.

Becky Robinson of Weaving Influence meets regularly with a coach. She appreciates having an outside perspective. Her coaches challenge her thinking, help her identify blind spots, work through challenges, and give her encouragement.  Follow Becky

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates participates regularly with her professional association where she learns from her peers and invariably gets practical tips she can use. She also knows that sometimes you have to turn your brain off to increase its performance.  Follow Shelley

Learning never exhausts the mind.
~ Leonardo da Vinci

Linda Fisher Thornton of Leading in Context follows global trends across disciplines that impact leadership, business and ethics. She reads trend reports and books and attends webinars and live speaking events, looking for insights into leadership challenges, mindsets and approaches that will help leaders succeed in the future as the world changes.  Follow Linda.

Dr. Artika Tyner of the Planting People. Growing Justice Institute suggests that movies can help you grow. These top 10 movies will provide you with the tools to serve and lead in the global community. Follow Artika.

Thank you so much! We welcome anyone looking to participate in the next Frontline Festival.