What's Really Killing Morale and Employee Engagement

Janice shared:

I’d had enough: the gossip; the veterans scaring the new hires; more and more people doing just enough to get by… And I was frustrated because we’d done so much to foster employee engagement.

I changed out some toxic leaders. We revamped our coaching program to focus on the positive. I’m here every Saturday right along with them. I bring bagels. The day I forgot the bagels, I bought lunch. We have fun incentive programs and have really positive approach to coaching.

I was intrigued. The call center I’d been called in to do consulting work for was doing so much right. And yet they had brought me in, “because there’s always room for improvement.” Yes, another sign that they are Winning Well. They had terrific margins, unheard of low turnover, and everyone was smiling.  

Apparently, it wasn’t always that way.

I asked about the tipping point.

One Saturday, I just couldn’t take it any more. So I transferred the phones to another center, and had everyone pull their chairs to the center of the office. I expressed my frustration– and then said, “Please, please help me. What is the source of our morale problem?”

I was shocked by the answer. 

They didn’t want more fun, incentives or even time off the phones.

It all came down to one thing.

They wanted us to take a hard stand on the slackers. Those coming in late. Putting customers on hold for an extra breather. Absence. 

Side note– Apparently there was almost unanimous agreement that this was the issue, while three people remained silent– you guessed it– the slackers.

So I pulled reports and dug into the patterns of every rep. 

Note: She then pulled out binder-clipped half-inch stack of paper– which was a computer print out of one rep’s tardy logins (all one or two minutes), but there must have been hundreds of occurrences.

Which of course begs the question– why should I sign in on time, if no one does anything to those who don’t?

Then I met with every rep and showed them the impact they were having on our morale problem. If they were consistently on time and doing the right things, I thanked them and apologized for not paying closer attention. If they were part of the problem, I asked for their commitment on specific behaviors to improve.

Morale soared.

Letting slackers slide may seem like a short-cut to being likable. But such “Pleaser” behaviors crush the spirit of those making the biggest impact on your team.  

Where do you need to hold people more accountable?

Winning Well Bootcamp

Christmas In July: How To Make Everyday Magic

It was a sweltering July day, the heat wave had been going on for weeks. We only had a window air conditioner in one room in the house. It was starting to feel crowded. My mom had used up her usual tricks to stay cool the library, the movies, peppermint stick ice cream with chocolate sprinkles. And then on the 25th of July, we woke up to Christmas carols blaring throughout the house, and the smell of French Toast and bacon. “No swimming lessons today girls, it’s Christmas in July.”

We ran downstairs and sure enough our kitchen table was covered in paper snowflakes and a small pile of fun little gifts. We forgot about the heat. What a morning what a mom.

Finding Christmas in July

Leaders create extraordinary. Magic moments require effort, not money. All told, I bet that “Christmas” cost less than $30, and yet it stands out more than the real deal.

Create leadership magic through:

  • Creativity
  • Absurdity
  • Surprise
  • Effort
  • Silly
  • Caring
  • Just-in-time support

The Secret to Employee Engagement

“How do I get my team to care?” Employee engagement is the number one requested topic from my readers. If you’re struggling with employee engagement, you’re not alone. Gallup says:

“Seventy-one percent of American workers are “not engaged” or “actively disengaged” in their work, meaning they are emotionally disconnected from their workplaces and are less likely to be productive.”

The disengagement increases with education. Americans with a college degree are “significantly less likely to be engaged in their jobs than are those with a high school diploma or less.” We hire for knowledge and then discourage contribution.

The Secret to Employee Engagement

I recently met with 2 new hire training classes. One was alive, actively interested, asked great questions, and shared their optimism for their careers. The other class looked at me skeptically. Didn’t say much. Yawns were involved.

My colleage looked at me after my meetings, “Wow, what a difference in engagement between those two groups.” What was the difference? The hiring demographics? The trainer? Frontline leadership? Nope.

Look Within First

It was me. I approached the first class as I normally do. I walked around the room and asked each person to introduce themselves– to tell me something about them personally. I heard of new babies, graduations, hobbies. I also asked them to share “why they will be a rock star in this position.” As they shared, I linked their ideas to key messages I wanted to reinforce. Then, I shared a bit about me both at work and at home. After all that, we started the Q &A.

It was time consuming and we were short on time. As I entered the next classroom, I was warned “you took too long with the last class, we’re behind on the agenda, and we have a plane to catch.” I skipped the one-on-one intro stuff, and moved right to Q and A. Sure I was energetic and perky, but there was no trust. It wasn’t personal. I felt scary, and the yawns began. In hindsight, I should have skipped that class.

If you can’t engage well, don’t show up.

As leaders we set the tone for employee engagement.

  • Make it personal
  • Ask questions
  • Share yourself
  • Create connection
  • Inspire confidence
  • Assure them they matter
  • Insire a compelling vision
  • Link unique skills to the vision
  • Be fully engaged yourself
  • ?