3 Troubling Troubles of "Troublemakers"

The troublemaker. You know the type. He’s the noisy one. He ALWAYS has an opinion. He has no filter. Sometimes he raises his voice. When you see him coming you may find ways to look busy and avoid the conversation.

When no one is looking you may even mutter some choice words under your breath.

Most teams experience a “troublemaker” from time to time.

The Trouble with Troublemakers

I’ve found 3 troubling troubles with such troublemakers. What have you found?

Trouble #1: They Create Negative Energy

Unchecked troublemakers may create a negative drain on a positive team. They can dominate meetings. Others may try to stand up to them for a while, but give up when it just eggs them on.

Trouble #2: They Bring Out the Worst in Your Leadership

After a while these troublemakers may wear on you too. When you are under pressure, you may lose patience. You may stop listening. You may react in a negative way.

Trouble #3: They May Be Right

These “troublemakers” may be loud and frustrating, but they are often right. The real trouble is they are often worth listening to. Beneath all that noise and confusion, are often salient concerns worth checking out with the rest of the team.

Tips for Taming the Trouble

Here’s some techniques that I have found worthwhile. What would you add?

  • Validate their feelings, ensure they feel heard
  • Take it offline, don’t engage in debate in front of the team
  • Schedule private time to hear their ideas
  • Give them a specific, productive role on the team
  • Keep them challenged
  • Recognize their successes
  • Provide space to talk about other issues they may be experiencing
  • Talk with them about what would help them skip to work
  • ???

3 Troubling Troubles of “Troublemakers”

The troublemaker. You know the type. He’s the noisy one. He ALWAYS has an opinion. He has no filter. Sometimes he raises his voice. When you see him coming you may find ways to look busy and avoid the conversation.

When no one is looking you may even mutter some choice words under your breath.

Most teams experience a “troublemaker” from time to time.

The Trouble with Troublemakers

I’ve found 3 troubling troubles with such troublemakers. What have you found?

Trouble #1: They Create Negative Energy

Unchecked troublemakers may create a negative drain on a positive team. They can dominate meetings. Others may try to stand up to them for a while, but give up when it just eggs them on.

Trouble #2: They Bring Out the Worst in Your Leadership

After a while these troublemakers may wear on you too. When you are under pressure, you may lose patience. You may stop listening. You may react in a negative way.

Trouble #3: They May Be Right

These “troublemakers” may be loud and frustrating, but they are often right. The real trouble is they are often worth listening to. Beneath all that noise and confusion, are often salient concerns worth checking out with the rest of the team.

Tips for Taming the Trouble

Here’s some techniques that I have found worthwhile. What would you add?

  • Validate their feelings, ensure they feel heard
  • Take it offline, don’t engage in debate in front of the team
  • Schedule private time to hear their ideas
  • Give them a specific, productive role on the team
  • Keep them challenged
  • Recognize their successes
  • Provide space to talk about other issues they may be experiencing
  • Talk with them about what would help them skip to work
  • ???

How To Melt A Grinch's Heart

This time of year we may call them “the grinch,” but you know the type. “Disgruntled,” “negative,” the ones of you label in the “quit and stay” category.

I’ve been to many a meeting and several change workshops where the sentiment goes something like this.

“It could be his head wasn’t screwed on just right.
It could be, perhaps that his shoes were too tight.
But I think that the most likely reason of all
May have been that his heart was two sizes too small”
~Dr. Seuss

“Don’t waste your energy on that segment.”

“They will suck you dry, just move on”

“You can’t change them anyway.”

“Give your attention and energy to the rest of the team.”

Perhaps.

Sometimes that is true. I have “wasted” lots of “energy” on such “grinches” over the years.

On the other hand, I also know it’s possible to melt a “grinch’s heart.” The rewards are remarkable. WIth your heart-melting powers you may change a life, enhance the business, and feel the deep satisfaction that comes from doing your best as a leader.

Isn’t it worth a try?

Melting the Outer Grinch

We all have our grinch-turnaround stories. These classic Christmas stories come from real life.

Here’s my view, please share yours…

  • Don’t label them as a “grinch” or any such word to yourself, to them, or to others
  • Take the time to get to know them as a person (there’s likely more to this picture that may require some empathy)
  • Listen to their concerns (chances are there’s some really important points underneath all that ice)
  • Share a bit about what worries you and your concerns
  • Find out what they love to do and tap into those gifts
  • Recognize the small wins
  • Ask them to help someone else
  • What would you add (please share in your comments)
“And what happened then…
Well in Who-ville they say
That the Grinch’s small heart
Grew three sizes that day!
And the minute his heart didn’t feel quite so tight;
He whizzed with his load through the bright morning light…”

 

How To Melt A Grinch’s Heart

This time of year we may call them “the grinch,” but you know the type. “Disgruntled,” “negative,” the ones of you label in the “quit and stay” category.

I’ve been to many a meeting and several change workshops where the sentiment goes something like this.

“It could be his head wasn’t screwed on just right.
It could be, perhaps that his shoes were too tight.
But I think that the most likely reason of all
May have been that his heart was two sizes too small”
~Dr. Seuss

“Don’t waste your energy on that segment.”

“They will suck you dry, just move on”

“You can’t change them anyway.”

“Give your attention and energy to the rest of the team.”

Perhaps.

Sometimes that is true. I have “wasted” lots of “energy” on such “grinches” over the years.

On the other hand, I also know it’s possible to melt a “grinch’s heart.” The rewards are remarkable. WIth your heart-melting powers you may change a life, enhance the business, and feel the deep satisfaction that comes from doing your best as a leader.

Isn’t it worth a try?

Melting the Outer Grinch

We all have our grinch-turnaround stories. These classic Christmas stories come from real life.

Here’s my view, please share yours…

  • Don’t label them as a “grinch” or any such word to yourself, to them, or to others
  • Take the time to get to know them as a person (there’s likely more to this picture that may require some empathy)
  • Listen to their concerns (chances are there’s some really important points underneath all that ice)
  • Share a bit about what worries you and your concerns
  • Find out what they love to do and tap into those gifts
  • Recognize the small wins
  • Ask them to help someone else
  • What would you add (please share in your comments)
“And what happened then…
Well in Who-ville they say
That the Grinch’s small heart
Grew three sizes that day!
And the minute his heart didn’t feel quite so tight;
He whizzed with his load through the bright morning light…”