Parents as Leaders: A Frontline Festival

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. July’s Festival is all about Parents as Leaders. Be sure to enter your email on the side bar to get our new free e-book “A Parent’s Guide to Leadership.” Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vixwerx for the great pic.

“We live in a world in which we need to share responsibility. It’s easy to say “It’s not my child, not my community, not my world, not my problem.” Then there are those who see the need and respond. I consider those people my heroes.” Mr. Fred Rogers

Being a Role Model

Alli Polin of Break the Frame shares Modeling Leadership Grows Future Leaders. We help our children grow their confidence, competence and creativity every time we let them explore, try and stretch. How are you modeling leadership? Follow Alli @AlliPolin

Eric Dingler of Whole Life Leadership brings back Thermostat or Thermometer? Helping Kids Feel The Leadership Climate. Parents need to challenge their kids to not just react to the leadership climate but to influence it. Ask your kids after school; “were you a thermostat or thermometer today? Follow Eric @EricDingler

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership contributes Mom’s Supervision Lessons. When Wally first became a boss, his primary role model for good supervision was his mother. Here’s what he learned from being her son. Follow Wally @WallyBock

Bob Whipple of the TrustAmbassador.com offers That’s Not Right. Here is an important lesson Bob’s mother taught him when he was little that saved him as a youth. Follow Bob @RWhipple

Bill Benoist of Leadership Heart Coaching shares The Legacy We Leave as Parents. Good or bad, there is no denying the influence we have on our children. As parents, we are all leaders. Follow Bill @LeadershipHeart

Finding Balance

Dawn Falcone of Dawn Falcone Lifestyles brings us Not Enough. As a professional organizer who helps busy working moms get the chaos and clutter in their lives under control, so their businesses run smoothly and they can be the patient moms they long to be. Dawn wrote a three part series featuring the three words/phrases she hears most often from her clients, “Not Enough, Overwhelmed and Too Much” with tips to cures for each. Follow Dawn @DawnFalcone

Lisa Kohn of Thoughtful Leaders Blog contributes Stop Swimming Upstream. Lisa shares why going with the flow and yielding allows us to realize greater gain with less effort! Follow Lisa @ThoughtfulLdrs

Learning from Our Children

Tanveer Naseer of Tanveer Naseer Leadership shares What My Kids Taught Me About Inspiration and Execution. Tanveer shares a lesson learned from watching his daughters’ build sand castles, on what drives us to push forward to achieve the shared purpose that defines our organization. Follow Tanveer @TanveerNaseer

Tom Eakin of GoBoom Blog brings us Can You Fathom Your Thoughts Into One Meaningful System? H0w Tom’s 12-year old daughter helped him illustrate a learning point he was trying to make to her and her brother with a quote from the John Green book, The Fault In Our Stars. Follow Tom @goboomlife

Ways and Means

“It is time for parents to teach young people early on, that in diversity there is beauty and there is strength.” -Maya Angelou

Julie Winkle Giulioni of the  Julie Winkle Giulioni Blog offers Letting Go With Grace. Parenting and leadership involve times when it’s necessary to hold on… and others when it’s necessary to let go. Julie suggests that excessive attachments in today’s warp-speed world shape not only who we become – but what our organizations become. It poses the question: Could ‘holding on’ be holding us back? Follow Julie @Julie_WG

Matt McWilliams of MattMcWilliams.com brings us Give Me 3 Minutes a Day–And You’ll Raise World Changers. Declarations are powerful. Some of the top achievers and world changers across the globe use them and they even work on kids. Follow Matt @MattMcWilliams2

Julie Pierce of Empowered by Pierce offers Wise Advise From Leader Moms. Julie shares some of the best advice she’s received over the years as a leader mom. Follow Julie @Julie_Pierce

Jesse Stoner of the Jesse Lyn Stoner Blog shares How the Power of Vision Can Help Your Family & 4 Tips to Create One. According to statistics, nearly three quarters of students have consumed alcohol by the end of high school, and more than a third have done so by eighth grade, drug use is on the rise, and over 40% of teenagers report being bullied online. How can we protect our children? Clearly there are no easy answers. However, there are some things parents can do to create a strong foundation for your children, and one of the best places to start is to create a family vision. Follow Jesse @JesseLynStoner

John Hunter of the Curious Cat Science and Engineering Blog brings us Encouraging Curiosity in Kids. Anytime a kid asks “why” it is an opportunity to teach and to encourage them to keep being curious; and curiosity is a key to building great leaders. Follow John @curiouscat_com

Jennifer V. Miller of The People Equation contributes Leadership Worry Strips Away Confidence. Jennifer reflects on her teen son’s independence and realizes her leadership mistake in trying to build his confidence. Follow Jennifer @JenniferVMiller

Guest Posts From Children

“Parents can only give good advice or put them on the right paths, but the final forming of a person’s character lies in their own hands.” -Anne Frank

Sandhya Varadharajan followed up to my post on Leadership Books for Young Children by recommending Leadership Books for the Older Crowd

Sebastian Hurt brings us a piece from his younger days, “Lucky or Skillful”

FrontLine2014picmonkeyJared Herr also shares musings from his youth, Kermit the Frog as Leader? It’s Not Easy Leading Green Follow Jared @Jared_Herr

Ben Evans, LGL intern and Frontline Festival editor, shares his insights from work at the UUNO United Nations Conference. Follow Ben @JollyGoodMello

Thank you to all who contributed, if you missed this month, please be sure to submit for August in which our Festival will focus on Humor in the Workplace. Now accepting those submissions, Click Here to submit.

 

 

Effective Networking: 6 Secrets Your Kids Know

We’d spent the last 5 days reconnecting as a family, completely dark from any semblance of social networking. Alright, I’ll be honest… all networking…each night my husband and I requested a table for 4 on this 5 night cruise to Mexico. It’s cool to meet other travelers… but not this time, we needed family and rest.

The final evening’s entertainment was a magic show.

My son, Sebastian, was lucky enough to be selected as the “assistant.” I wasn’t shocked by his hammy performance (he comes by that naturally). What happened next intrigued me.

As we exited the auditorium, people approached my son and began waving and congratulating him from across the room. He had stories about everyone. “Oh those are the women who taught me Mexican dominos at the pool, they live in Bri-ain,” trying to work his Liverpudlian accent, “but are really from Daaaalllas,” adding a draw. “You remember Abe, he calls himself the sausage king, he’s half deaf but likes to play the drums.”

The pattern continued as we hopped on the elevator…. “She’s the mommy of the girl I played ping-pong with on Tuesday.” And then on the way to dinner… and then again in the customs line the next day… This kid had connections.

The truth is most kids make friends more easily than grown-ups. We start being open to new connections and grow ourselves out of it.

What Kids Can Teach Us About Networking

Kids can teach us a lot about networking. Try working a few of these approaches into your networking.

  1. No agenda – Kids connect with no agenda. They don’t think, “gee, if I meet this girl, maybe she’ll introduce me to her brother with the Pokemon shirt…he may have a card in his collection I need…” Nope, they just join in and see what happens. They build relationships for the sake of relationships.
  2. Are open to new relationships – If someone introduces themselves, they don’t question motive.  Kids don’t wonder, “what’s this guy really want?”  They get past the small talk sooner. “Yeah, my math teacher’s really mean too… but maybe it’s me, I hate math.”
  3. They play – You’re going to meet a lot more people playing in the pool than on the deck. Kids get in the pool. Play leads to natural interaction and builds relationships.
  4. They share toys – Kids are taught to share their toys, and doing so leads to friendships. Grown-ups lose this instinct. I’m always amazed in my fitness class how grown-ups fight over weights (that don’t even belong to them). You can only use one set at a time, but everyone likes to have choices in front of them, just in case. Asking the person one mat over to “borrow” their weights typically leads to a dirty look. No one proactively offers. Most grown-ups don’t follow the same rules they teach their kids.
  5. They follow-up – When they meet someone they like, they attach more quickly. “That was fun, are you going to the kid’s club after dinner? Wanna meet at the pool again tomorrow?” They don’t call it networking. They have no system, they just ask.
  6. They bounce back. – No one likes to feel rejected. But most kids seem to accept casual slights for what they are. They don’t over-analyze. “What happened to John?” “Oh, he didn’t want to play any more.” They move on.

Alex's Lemonade Stand: Leadership And Kids

Kids can, and do, make a leadership difference in their community every day.

My nephew, Jared Herr and his friend Caton Raffesperger, have raised over $28,000 for Alex’s Lemonade Stand through their independence day lemonade stand in Gettysburg, PA.

They share Alex’s story and their own journey in this short video.

As Gettysburg celebrates the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, they’re hoping to set a weekend record. To make a donation visit their site  or text an anonymous $10, by texting Lemonade 112680 to 85944.

Happy 4th of July.

You may also enjoy:

The Top Three Leadership Lessons from the Battle of Gettysbug
Democracy- 5 Ways You Can Make It More Meaningful
Why Volunteering Makes You a Better Leader
Leadership and Kids: The Best Way to Teach Your Kids About Leadership

*Photo Lemon Aid by Larry Kohlenstein

Alex’s Lemonade Stand: Leadership And Kids

Kids can, and do, make a leadership difference in their community every day.

My nephew, Jared Herr and his friend Caton Raffesperger, have raised over $28,000 for Alex’s Lemonade Stand through their independence day lemonade stand in Gettysburg, PA.

They share Alex’s story and their own journey in this short video.

As Gettysburg celebrates the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, they’re hoping to set a weekend record. To make a donation visit their site  or text an anonymous $10, by texting Lemonade 112680 to 85944.

Happy 4th of July.

You may also enjoy:

The Top Three Leadership Lessons from the Battle of Gettysbug
Democracy- 5 Ways You Can Make It More Meaningful
Why Volunteering Makes You a Better Leader
Leadership and Kids: The Best Way to Teach Your Kids About Leadership

*Photo Lemon Aid by Larry Kohlenstein

leadership in kids

Children’s Books on Leadership– Questions to Inspire Young Thinking

Which children’s books are the most helpful in teaching leadership to kids? I posed this question in my online leadership communities, as well as to parents, and a children’s librarian. The suggestions came pouring in. So many of us have fond memories of reading as a child and of reading with our own children. Thank you to all who shared your stories of the stories you love and the meanings they hold.

In culling through the lists, it became clear to me that so many children’s books don’t speak of leadership directly, but they provide a great way to isolate one or two specific leadership variables. My son, Sebastian, age 7 and I went to the library and got a big stack of your suggestions. We’ve been playing a very simple game. We read the children’s book and then he tells me what leadership characteristic the book is about. He got so excited about the game that last Saturday he woke me up at 1 am asking to “play again.”

I am starting with children’s books for the younger set. I have some excitement brewing for the older crowd stay tuned.

Children’s Books on Leadership Foundations

Here’s a start from your suggestions, with links on where to find them.

Please add to the list through your comments.

Authenticity

The Velveteen Rabbit

The Tale of Desperaux

The Emperor’s New Clothes

The King’s Stilts (Seb’s most requested)

Incredible You

Perseverance

The Carrot Seed

The Little Engine That Could

Tortoise and The Hare

Creativity/Problem Solving

Harold and the Purple Crayon

Oh the Thinks You Can Think

There’s No Such Thing as a Dragon

Servant Leadership

The Giving Tree (most popular suggestion)

Rainbow Fish (for the youngest padawans)

Empowerment/ Process

Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type

Ox Cart Man

Teamwork

Crown Me

Stone Soup

The Little Red Hen

Some Questions That Spark Great Kid Conversation

What does this book teach us about leadership?

Who do you admire in this book? Why?

What other choices did ____ have?

What would you have done in this situation? Why?

What do you think happens next in this story?

You can also download the Parent’s Guide to Leadership Free eBook here.

Leadership from A Kid's Point Of View (Lucky or Skillful?)

A Saturday Salutation Guest Post

Sebastian Hurt, Age 7

Sebastian is my son, and a First Grader. He loves Jiu Jitsu, beyblades, and climbing new mountains. After much dinner table conversation on leadership and posts, he asked to write his own. I served only as typist. What a fantastic conversation.

He was troubled with all the stories from history and the Bible where people seemed to land into leadership positions and not handle it well. When listening to me talking, he said, “mom, all that advice is good, but sometimes people become leaders because they are lucky.”

 He started with thoughts on leadership “by chance” or ” by luck.” Here is where he landed.

Let’s grow leaders! Game on.

I have an intrigued heart and excited mind open to thoughts from your youth and children and would be happy to talk with them and promote their ideas. Please consider sending my way as a future Saturday Salutation (see below for a few others).

Seb’s Leadership Theory

Sometimes it’s part of leadership how you are born.

It’s not always fair and I don’t approve of it either.

You cannot be a good leader without proving yourself.

The only thing you need to be a leader is to show your mind and courage.

I will tell you about the four powers of leadership, both good and bad.

Mind: The mind can help you in your journey for leadership if you have calmness

Power: Power can be destructive and creative chose which one is yours

Sacrifice:: To be a perfect leader you must sacrifice your own time for your followers

Willingness: You must have the will to give your all

P.S . BOUYAA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Leadership from A Kid’s Point Of View (Lucky or Skillful?)

A Saturday Salutation Guest Post

Sebastian Hurt, Age 7

Sebastian is my son, and a First Grader. He loves Jiu Jitsu, beyblades, and climbing new mountains. After much dinner table conversation on leadership and posts, he asked to write his own. I served only as typist. What a fantastic conversation.

He was troubled with all the stories from history and the Bible where people seemed to land into leadership positions and not handle it well. When listening to me talking, he said, “mom, all that advice is good, but sometimes people become leaders because they are lucky.”

 He started with thoughts on leadership “by chance” or ” by luck.” Here is where he landed.

Let’s grow leaders! Game on.

I have an intrigued heart and excited mind open to thoughts from your youth and children and would be happy to talk with them and promote their ideas. Please consider sending my way as a future Saturday Salutation (see below for a few others).

Seb’s Leadership Theory

Sometimes it’s part of leadership how you are born.

It’s not always fair and I don’t approve of it either.

You cannot be a good leader without proving yourself.

The only thing you need to be a leader is to show your mind and courage.

I will tell you about the four powers of leadership, both good and bad.

Mind: The mind can help you in your journey for leadership if you have calmness

Power: Power can be destructive and creative chose which one is yours

Sacrifice:: To be a perfect leader you must sacrifice your own time for your followers

Willingness: You must have the will to give your all

P.S . BOUYAA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!