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The Secret To Increased Productivity: 3 Steps to Improved Performance post image

Do you hope for increased productivity? The solution may be closer than you think.

A guest post from Karin Rigas, Greve, Denmark

Karin Moeller Rigas has worked as a Sales Manager, Executive Coach, and Management Consultant within Retail Banking for more than 25 years. Founder of www.emodigy.com, an e-learning site for managers, she is the author of the book, You are special – Strong foundations make great employees.

Looking for increased productivity? Don’t look for yet another tool to implement in the organization. Instead, look seriously within yourself as a manager and leader.

Scientific studies indicate…

  • Most frustrations during the day are caused by managers
  • Frustration leads to lower productivity
  • Recognition from the manager is by far the largest trigger for increased performance
  • People want to be successful and know when they are successful
  • Highly skilled leaders create high performing teams

Why not use yourself as the tool to increase performance and productivity?

There are 3 important elements to increasing productivity: establishing key values, structuring your interaction with employees, and continuously improving your own performance.

Establish Your Key Values

It starts by leaning on simple values.

Below are the values that guide my leadership, what would you add?

  • People want to do their best.
  • People want to be involved in designing their own future.
  • People’s strengths compensate for their focus areas (when they are in the right job)
  • Great storytelling is key to emotional engagement
  • Balancing “setting direction” and “developing people” in a clever way leads to success in leadership
  • A person’s best performance is built upon solutions they chose
  • People want to learn more– everyone learns differently.
  • Leaders must be multi-dimensional to be able to support the employees’ development.
  • Receiving and giving feedback with an open mind, creates trust in the relationship and is a pre-requisite for a great learning curve.
  • Leaders must be close to their people in everyday leadership.
  • Recognition and appreciation in everyday working life is the largest driver for great performances and good health.
  • ???

Structure your interactions

Be close to people in everyday management and leadership through regular and scheduled meetings like monthly meetings. Vary meeting style to include co-hosted meetings, success-sharing meetings and performance management meetings. The core tool for these conversations is coaching and feedback. These interactions are a great way to role-model and reinforce your key values.

Improve your own performance and productivity

Get coaching and feedback yourself. Let other people see you in action and let them help you with feedback and coaching. There is nothing more effective than on-the-job training– go ”all in.” The more you are willing to get feedback (from all directions), listen to it, and change, the larger a step you will take in your own personal development. The more you improve, the larger impact you will make on people activities and results.

What are your secrets to improving productivity and performance?
Filed Under:   Results & Execution
 
 
Karin Hurt
Karin Hurt
Karin Hurt is a leadership speaker, consultant, and MBA professor. She's a former Verizon Wireless executive with two decades of diverse cross-functional experience in sales, customer service and HR. Karin was named as a top 100 Thought Leader in Trustworthy Business Behavior by Trust Across America. She is author of, "Overcoming an Imperfect Boss: A Practical Guide to Building a Better Relationship With Your Boss. Karin knows the stillness of a yogi, the reflective road of a marathoner and the joy of being a mom raising emerging leaders.
 

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What People Are Saying

Eric Dingler (@EricDingler)   |   21 November 2012   |   Reply

Karin,

Great list. I’ve copied it into Evernote to study it a bit more.

My key core of leadership is to keep it genuine. A leader has to remember that more is caught than is taught.

A question I use and ask my other leaders to be asking themselves…. “Are you the leader the people you want to lead want to follow?”

I think this leads to improved performance and productivity.

Karin Hurt   |   21 November 2012   |   Reply

Thanks, Eric. I thought he had a good list too. I agree with you completely about being genuine. There is risk in working to adapt our styles too much, and appear being inauthentic.

Steve Borek   |   21 November 2012   |   Reply

I think it’s more important for employees to be in tune with their own values. If their values align with the organization, you’ll have a team that will struggle for shared aspirations.

letsgrowleaders   |   21 November 2012   |   Reply

Steve, a vital point. I think it’s very important for leaders to understand their own values, but also to help their team to clarify and articulate their own… and how they align. As always, thanks for adding to the conversation.

Frank Hazzard   |   29 November 2012   |   Reply

I was glad to see “great story telling” on the list. I have been reading a lot about the art of telling stories and the effects it has on leadership. See this post… http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20121128211835-117825785-effective-leaders-are-effective-storytellers

letsgrowleaders   |   30 November 2012   |   Reply

Thanks so much, Frank. That’s a great article you shared. Yes, I am a big believer in strategic storytelling. You may enjoy this post I wrote on the subject. http://letsgrowleaders.com/?s=a+strategic+story+about+storytelling