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One Common Interviewing Mistake That Will Cost You the Job post image

My phone rang. Colin was exasperated. “Karin, I thought I NAILED the interview. The owner seemed pleased with all my answers, and I had great stories for all his behavior-based interview questions. But I just got an email from him saying that although I was qualified,  he was worried about my passion for training!!! You KNOW how passionate I am about training– it’s my life! I was energetic throughout the whole process. Where could this have gone wrong?”

I had an inkling, but probed further. Sure enough, Colin had made one of the most frequent and well-intention mistakes that so often tank a solid interview.

He appeared desperate.

When asked if the training job was not available, if he would be willing take a call center manager job for a few years. Wanting to appear flexible and interested in learning the business he said, “sure.”

A similar problem plagued Joe, a Director level succession planning candidate who came to me for coaching.

He had applied for several VP jobs: VP of Care, VP of Sales, VP of Marketing and always made the last round, but never got the job.

When I conducted interviews with key stakeholders to get underneath what was going on, everyone had a similar taste in their mouth about Joe.”He doesn’t seem to know what he really wants to do–besides have the title VP behind his name. When he interviewed for the care job, he gushed about how passionate he is about customer service, and how this is his dream job. He almost had me convinced, until I heard he was equally zealous about the sales role. We need a leader with a passion for the role, not just a passion for power.”

Yikes.

4 Ways to Let Your Passion For the Position Shine Through

Of course you want to appear flexible in an interview. But too much flexibility makes you look desperate–like the guy working his way down the bar trying to land a date. “I’ll settle for this one” doesn’t make you an attractive match.

  1. Know What You Really Want
    This might sound really obvious, but trust me, I’ve asked “Why do you want this job?” in so many interviews–and it’s a surprising stumper. If “to make more money” or to “be promoted” is the answer, even if you say something different, any interviewer worth their salt will see right through. Know why this job matters to you and be able to articulate your reasoning well.
  2. Have a Plan
    Of course it’s perfectly possible that you’re equally qualified for several positions. Before starting LGL, I made a career of dramatic cross-functional moves within Verizon, but I didn’t apply for them all at the same time. If you are highly interested in several roles, be able to explain the strategic value holding each of these positions now (or later) will help you contribute now, and in the future to the company. If you’re interviewing externally and your answer to “Where else are you applying?” looks as random as the fruit on a slot machine, you had better find a way to connect the dots.
  3. Do Your Homework
    The key is to really do your homework and be able explain why your skill sets add the most value for THIS job at THIS company. You can’t do that without really knowing what THIS job and THIS company is all about.
  4. Be Authentic, But Have a Filter
    I had another millennial call me to tell me he was in jeopardy of not getting a role because of how he answered the question “Where do you want to be in 15 years?” Well, the fact that he wanted to own his own business in 15 years was TMI (too much information) at this point for his interviewer who got all worried about “loyalty.” The sad part was, this guy WAS TOTALLY PREPARED to work there for 10 years. “Well, I’m not sue about 15 years, that’s a long time. But I would love to talk more about what the next decade could look like for our partnership.” Authentic AND intriguing.

There’s nothing more frustrating that watching the good guys lose the opportunity because of a communication breakdown. Avoid this common mistake and let your passion for the position shine through.

Winning Well Karin Hurt and David DyeIf you have not yet checked our David Dye’s and my latest book, Winning Well: A Manager’s Guide To Getting Results–without Losing Your Soul, you can download the first few chapters for FREE here, as well as take our online assessment. We also have a recently released our new Winning Well online course. Please contact me at karin.hurt@letsgrowleaders.com to learn more about how we can help your team through keynotes, workshops, or online programs.

Filed Under:   Career & Learning
 
 
Karin Hurt
Karin Hurt
Karin Hurt helps leaders around the world achieve breakthrough results, without losing their soul. A former Verizon Wireless executive, she has over two decades of experience in sales, customer service, and HR. She was recently named on Inc's list of 100 Great Leadership Speakers, AMA's 50 Leaders to Watch in 2015, & Top Thought Leader in Trust by Trust Across America. She’s the author of 2 books: Winning Well: A Manager's Guide to Getting Results-Without Losing Your Soul and Overcoming an Imperfect Boss.
 

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What People Are Saying

Alli Polin   |   13 June 2016   |   Reply

Great points, Karin. I’ve interviewed tons of candidates and when I hear, “I’ll do whatever” or “I’m a jack of all trades” I wonder who they want to be and what they love vs what they can do. Especially with more senior positions, the headaches are 10 fold. It’s beyond executing the work and if it’s not in your sweet spot, burnout is just about guaranteed.

When I finally got promoted to VP, it was my dream job (on paper) doing work I loved and adored. One of the reasons I was the right candidate was because my experience matched the job description and I could honestly say there was no work I’d rather be doing.

Alli

Karin Hurt   |   13 June 2016   |   Reply

Alli, Thanks so much as always for sharing your experiences. I too have found it’s so important to understand what you want and why you want it.

LaRae Quy   |   13 June 2016   |   Reply

I really like how you encourage your readers to be authentic, but have a filter. So much emphasis on authenticity these days and that is good, but when interviewing always keep your audience in mind! Great advice…

James McKey   |   13 June 2016   |   Reply

Great advice and insight to hearing about what is so often happening behind the curtains and most of us don’t know about.

zafarmanzoor   |   14 June 2016   |   Reply

Excellent list.All points are very powerful and must be remembered.
Zafarmanzoor, Sr.Executive, Pakistan.