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Frontline Festival April 2016: Leaders share what Winning Well means to them post image

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival celebrates the launch of Winning Well and is all about leaders sharing what winning well means to them.Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors!

Want to learn more about Winning Well? You can download the first few chapters for free here. Has Winning Well improved your leadership? Help us spread the word by writing an Amazon review.

Next month, we are looking for your best insights on professional development for leaders…what do you to to keep filling your pool of knowledge? Submit your contribution here by May 13!

Now, on to this month’s contributions:

According to Mary Jo Asmus of Aspire Collaborative Services  using logic is fine, but winning well leaders also use your intuition. This post describes some ways to develop it. Follow Mary Jo.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited suggests that sometimes, winning well leaders must do just ONE thing to make a day better. Follow Beth.

Michelle Cubas, CPCC, ACC, of Positive Potentials, LLC shares, “Winning Well for me is about being in touch with my values. That guides the metric I want to use. Winning feels good. Winning is not a measure of success unless it is by one’s own definition. Also, we must measure the cost of the win to get to the “achievement,” real and perceived. Follow Michelle.

Good management is not motivating, its cultivating an environment that releases internal motivations.
~ Winning Well

Ariana Friedlander of Rosabella Consulting shares that crowdfunding is not about raising money, it is about raising believers.  No one succeeds in isolation, and these 10 lessons learned from crowdfunding are relevant to for any winning well leader that seeks to create win-win-win arrangements for their team. Follow Ariana.

John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement shares that what matters is not your stated respect for people but your revealed respect for people based on your actions. This post provides actions you can take to demonstrate respect for all employees, a trait of those who win well. Follow John.

Paula Kiger of Big Green Pen points out that we can’t “win well” if we are constrained to the feeling that we must “train within the rules”. It is only by accepting the inevitability of exceptions and being willing to take risks that we can grow and thrive professionally. Follow Paula.

It isn’t what you think or say, it’s what you do that communicates trust.
~ Winning Well

Scott Mabry of Soul to Work offers a slightly different twist on winning well. Success can be measured in many different ways. Sometimes winning is giving our best to the situation we are dealt even if the results don’t land in our favor.  Follow Scott.

Robyn McLeod of Thoughtful Leaders Blog  presents “Are you venting or complaining?” where she shares that when venting is handled correctly, it can be a healthy and productive part of creating an effective team environment, and how to vent effectively.  Follow Robyn.

Jon Mertz of Thin Difference offers a unique view that we need to shift out of our winning obsession. Winning has lopped off purpose for profit, market share, or votes. When we focus on creating instead, our mindset shifts to collaboration, betterment, and the right mix of richness and purpose. Are you ready to start a revolution of creating well? Follow Jon.

Remember, you give your team a chance to follow you when you clearly connect their work to meaning, purpose and shared values.
~ Winning Well

Michelle Pallas of MichellePallas.com  points out that winning well leaders don’t act on every piece of adviceFollow Michelle.

Skip Prichard of Leadership Insights says if you want results and sustainable success, this is your guide. Karin Hurt and David Dye share leadership without losing your soul. Don’t choose between humility and results – you can have both. Follow Skip.

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates recommends that winning well leaders sometimes stop taking action.  Follow Shelley

Dr. Artika Tyner of the Planting People. Growing Justice Institute reminds us that Winning Well begins with building a shared vision. This determines where your team is headed and serves as a guide for achieving your goals. Follow Artika.

Bonus:

The Winning Well message is being shared all over! Here are links to several videos and podcasts. We appreciate every opportunity to share this important message!

When Working Hard Isn’t Working (Leadership Freak)

What do you mean, I’m a fraud? (Fast Leader)

A Guide to Getting Results without Losing Your Soul (Leadership Insights)

Growing Leaders (School for Startups)

David Dye on Experience Pros

For more, visit Winning Well on the web.

The Winning Well Tour! Let us bring the Winning Well tour to you! Contact me at karin.hurt@letsgrowleaders.com  or 443-750-1249 to talk about a customized Winning Well keynote or workshop just right or your team or organization.

Your turn. What does Winning Well mean to you?
Filed Under:   Everything Else, winning well
 
 
Karin Hurt
Karin Hurt
Karin Hurt helps leaders around the world achieve breakthrough results, without losing their soul. A former Verizon Wireless executive, she has over two decades of experience in sales, customer service, and HR. She was recently named on Inc's list of 100 Great Leadership Speakers, AMA's 50 Leaders to Watch in 2015, & Top Thought Leader in Trust by Trust Across America. She’s the author of 2 books: Winning Well: A Manager's Guide to Getting Results-Without Losing Your Soul and Overcoming an Imperfect Boss.
 

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What People Are Saying

Paula Kiger   |   24 April 2016   |   Reply

Karin, I really appreciate being included among so many leadership writers I respect and admire. I can’t wait to dig in to the other contribution!

Karin Hurt   |   25 April 2016   |   Reply

Thanks so much, Paula. So glad to have you.