The Great Millennial Hoax- Why Most Millennial Experts are Wrong and What to Do Instead (Recorded Webinar)

Whether you’re a veteran leader or a millennial recently promoted into a leadership role, leading your younger team members can feel like an endless struggle.

Why don’t they understand?

Why aren’t they motivated?

Why won’t they put in the time?

To make it worse, instead of making life easier, much of the advice you get from generational “experts” can actually make the situation worse.

The good news is that it doesn’t have to be this way. Your younger team members can be an incredible source of talent, energy, and productivity. I joined up with internationally recognized leadership experts, David Dye and Michael Teoh to share perspectives and insights on getting the most from your millennial team members.

We discussed:

  • What you really need to know to develop your millennial talent
  • How ordinary people have transformed their lives to achieve success
  • Keys to cultivate motivated, energized teams that get more done, solve problems on their own, and make everyone around them better.

The Great Millennial Hoax is the first of a series of collaborative events with Michael.

So please let us know your questions and ideas for future topics!

Michael Teoh (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia) is the Founder of Thriving Talents, a ‘Millennials-focused’ Talent Development company which delivers training and consultancy for Fortune 500 companies across 39 countries, in the areas of Attracting, Managing, Retaining & Motivating Millennials. He has shared the stage with other notable business icons like Sir Richard Branson, Sir Bob Geldof and even presented a workshop in the presence of President Barack Obama. His new book is The Potential Matrix.

Karin Hurt (Baltimore, MD) is a top leadership consultant, keynote speaker, and CEO of Let’s Grow Leaders. A former Verizon Wireless executive, she was named to Inc. Magazine’s list of great leadership speakers.

David Dye (Denver, CO) is a leadership keynote speaker, former nonprofit executive, elected official, award-winning author, and president of Trailblaze, Inc., a leadership training and consulting firm. Karin and David co-authored Winning Well: A Manager’s Guide to Getting Results Without Losing Your Soul.

The Winning Well Southeast Asia Tour

If you’re a manager in Southeast Asia and are interested in bringing Winning Well to your organization this spring or attending our summit in Malaysia please let us know.

We’re booking dates now.

 

Southeast Asia Tour

"I'm Not Listening!: The Best Way to Get Your Team to Hear Your Feedback

“John” and I had spent the better part of the hour talking about what his direct report, “Janis,” needed to be a more effective manager. Bless her heart, Janis had a hard time accepting feedback. If she didn’t improve, her job was on the line, but we didn’t want to put it that way. At least not yet.

We isolated the behaviors and built a solid developmental path forward.

As we transitioned to the “How you can help as her boss” conversation, I asked John what I thought was the next obvious question.

“What are you doing to develop yourself as a leader?”

“Oh me? I haven’t thought about that. I’ve been here so long. I’m not really working on anything specific.”

Trying to prevent the disbelief from showing too frantically on my face, I continued.

“Oh, well, what feedback have you received about your management style?  What’s working best? What drives your team crazy? What does your boss say?”

Crickets.

Note: the best thing to do with crickets in such a conversation is to let them chirp. 

We sat in silence for a few minutes.

“Well actually…. I do struggle with_____ and ______ and ________.”

“Excellent.  Let’s talk about you for a while and what you can do to leverage your strengths and become more effective in these other areas.”

John’s eyes sparkled with renewed energy as we made a plan.

“So here’s the most important part, John. Janis needs to hear how you are working on you.”

John didn’t love it. “I’m trying to fix her. How will it look if I admit I’ve got issues too?”

“John. When a leader has issues…trust me, the team already knows. The best thing you can do for Janis and the rest of your team in terms of leadership development is to admit you’re not perfect and that you’re working on getting better too. Janis will be so much more open to feedback and doing the work we need her to do, if she sees you modeling the way.”

The best way to get your team to hear your feedback is to show you’re working too. Leadership is never handled. When you start there, you open an important space to talk about and work on getting better.

6 Reasons Your Training Program Isn't Working

It was late.  Joanne, the HR Director, Juan dusting the doors, and I were the only ones left in the building. The only sounds were the swishing of the sprinklers hitting against the high glass windows. Joanne looked up at me from behind her desk with that exhausted, weary grin that comes from realizing that the work ahead is more complicated than you thought.

“There’s a reason you told me that story last week about that CEO you’re working with, isn’t there?”

I nodded.

JoAnne continued, “Just like that scene, this is bigger than a training issue isn’t it?”

“Yes,” I smiled, a little embarrassed to be called out for my seed planting. “I had a feeling it would be, but there was no way to know until we talked with the team. Thank you for staying so late with me tonight to dig deeper. Now we can clear the decks of a few things and ensure the support structure is in place so the training will work.”

Most of the time, when a “We need training, right now!” call comes in, it’s not about the training. Sure, training can help, but not in a vacuum. Often, there are bigger issues at play.

6 Reasons Your Training Program Isn’t Working

If your training need feels urgent, your training program isn’t working, or, if your team is reluctant to attend, dig deeper. Here are six issues that so often get in the way00that with a little up front work, can change the trajectory of results.

  1. Poor Leadership Behaviors at the Top
    Yes, in Winning Well we teach and encourage the skills and behaviors to create a cultural oasis.  In fact I receive calls every week from managers reading Winning Well who are doing just that. AND, if you’re the guy hiring us to train Winning Well,  please know we’re going to be very interested in your willingness to read the book and model the behaviors you’re hiring us to reinforce.
  2. Unclear Expectations
    If people are unsure of what to do or why they are doing it, training to do “it” better just won’t work.
  3. Lack of Support Systems
    For example: If you want people giving great behavior-based feedback, please be sure your performance systems focus on behaviors. So many more…let’s talk.
  4. Dipping
    We sat in front of an HR exec the other day who was crystal clear, “All the field wants is a one day training they can attend. No pre-work. No follow-up. No-reinforcement. No action plans.” That’s dipping not training, and won’t create sustainable change. Save your money.
  5. The Fix Me Factor
    As I was about to train a team the other night, one of the team members pulled me aside. “Everyone is making fun of us because you’re here. Why do we need the ‘expert?’ Everyone’s assuming that we’re broken and they are not.”  Never make training feel like a punishment.  They hadn’t… and yet the rumors prevailed. I addressed this up front and diffused — but now we need to keep listening.
  6. SASRNT syndrome  (So and So Really Needs This)
    It’s not me, it’s them. If you are in love with a training concept and want everyone you know to go through it, please pause first and consider how you can best leverage this concept in your own leadership.

If you’re looking to start a leadership development program, or to improve the one you have, I encourage you to pause first and consider the context.

If you want a sounding board, please call me at 443-750-1249 for a free Winning Well consultation.

Winning Well Bootcamp

 

Three Critical Steps to Developing Your Millennial Leadership Talent

A guest post from Elisha Yeoh, Thriving Talents, Malaysia.

You’ve seen them, you’ve heard of them, and some of you may even be working with them. These them I’m referring to is the Gen-Ys. Regardless of what you may currently think of them, the presence of these young individuals have definitely changed the realities of workplace dynamics, especially now that Gen-Ys are slowly being reviewed to fill in managerial positions.

More and more organizations are beginning to tear down walls (both metaphorically and literally) to keep up to date with the current trends of building up great young leaders who will one day assume more responsibilities. However are these young people in your organization ready to make the hard decisions and lead a team?

Step 1: Understanding The Way They Work

For years experts have been trying to understand millennials, to find out what makes them tick, and what drives them to want to do great work. And after all that research and with all the different clashing views, the general consensus to this finding is that this generation of young people is unlike anything we’ve seen before.

Team Dynamics

In the work setting, Gen-Ys are vastly different from the generation before them. Although they seem to be confident and want to stand out from the crowd, they actually value the opinions of their peers especially when it comes to making decisions. They aren’t shy about getting opinions be it about work or other personal related matters from their peers and are more likely to take their peers advice more seriously than those higher up in authority.

Roles in Leadership

The Gen-Ys today do not place a very high importance on leadership as they believe that they do not need to be placed in roles of authority to lead. They prefer to work in a group in a democratic setting where the decisions made are derivative of the values added by each person member of the group.

 Step 2: Providing A Clear Purpose

Unlike the other generations, the Gen-Ys are no longer only motivated by monetary incentives or added perks and benefits that an organization provides them, rather they need to be intrinsically motivated to want to perform at their very best.

Organizations need to give the Millennials a reason to want to be involved, to want to commit their time effort and energy. One of the best ways to sustain their dedication is to provide them a greater purpose to the tasks they are currently doing. Make them part of something so much bigger than themselves and keep them inspired as well as motivated by telling them of the impact that their work creates for the people outside your organization.

Step 3: Provide Them With Avenues To Grow

The Gen-Ys are painfully aware of their own strengths and weaknesses, they may seem like they are unaffected by their shortcomings, but growing up in an environment where they are so used to having their actions and ideas being validated can cause distress whenever they are faced with a problem they aren’t able to get over.

Organizations need to build an environment in which these Gen-Ys are given the chance to work on their strengths and learn to cope with their weaknesses. Provide them with a support structure in which they are allowed to continuously work on themselves as they become more invested in your organization.

Empower them with the necessary skills and training that will lead them to make better decisions. Allow them to test their limits, set them up for defeat in a safe environment through team building exercises and simulations for them to really know themselves and identify their leadership styles.

Join Us: August 19th for a FREE Webinar The Great Millennial Hoax Why Most Millennial Experts are Wrong and What to Do Instead

Malaysia Webinar blackDavid Dye and I are partnering with Michael Teoh, Author of The Potential Matrix and Founder of Thriving Talents on a series of events in Malaysia and the United States, beginning with this FREE webinar– register here. 

Whether you’re a veteran leader or a millennial recently promoted into a leadership role, leading your younger team members can feel like an endless struggle. Why don’t they understand? Why aren’t they motivated? Why won’t they put in the time?

To make it worse, instead of making life easier, much of the advice you get from generational “experts” can actually make the situation worse. The good news is that it doesn’t have to be this way. Your younger team members can be an incredible source of talent, energy, and productivity.

Join three internationally recognized leadership experts for a conversation that will answer your questions about getting the most from your millennial team members. You’ll walk away with:

  • What you really need to know to develop your millennial talent
  • How ordinary people have transformed their lives to achieve success
  • Keys to cultivate motivated, energized teams that get more done, solve problems on their own, and make everyone around them better.
  • And specific answers to your questions!

We are so excited about the opportunity to combines experience, wisdom, and perspectives from across generations – and across the world!

Register today and be sure to submit your question and get the answers you need!

5 Questions to Ask When You Can't Let It Go

“John,” the CEO of a fast-growing start-up, was visibly frustrated when I asked him what he needed me to work on with his team. “I love my team. And they care so much! They’re full of great ideas….”

I waited for the BUT.

“BUT,” Sometimes they get stuck on an idea and can’t move on. We’re moving fast and sometimes that means failing fast and letting go of ideas that didn’t work. Can you put some of that into your Winning Well bootcamp for them?”

I love it when curriculum design becomes blog post fodder.

Now the truth is, there was more to this story as I unraveled the layers… a solid dance of knowing when to hold-em, fold-em, walk away and run.  We worked on both letting go AND how to P.E.R.S.U.A.D.E. your boss.

5 Questions to Ask When You Can’t Let It Go

If you’re in a position where others are encouraging you to “let it go” when your heart says “hold on,” here are few questions to help you decide.

  1. Why am I so passionate about my idea or way of doing things?
    Are you coming from a place of true confident humility, or is fear or ego getting in the way?
  2. In one or two sentences, why am I so committed to my position?
    We must do _______ because __________ and if we don’t _________, the consequences will be __________.
  3. Who is encouraging me to let it go and why?
    It’s highly likely they have additional perspective. Be sure you understand it.
  4. What are the potential consequences to the big picture if I don’t let it go?
    Take time to really understand the pros and cons.
  5. If you were to let it go, where else could you focus your time?
    Sometimes you have to lose a battle to win the war. Fighting and holding on takes time and energy. What else can you accomplish?

The truth is, sometimes the answer is to let it go–holding on too tightly to your position, can slow down results and damage your career. AND sometimes the answer is to fight for what you know is right for the business and the people within it.

Winning Well Bootcamp

P.S. Speaking of managing up, this week I was honored to do a guest post for my friend, Dan Rockwell, on his Leadership Freak blog, entitled What to Do if Your Boss is a Wuss. 

Why I Don't Always Win Well: My Struggle With Being a Pleaser

David Dye and I are on a mission to rid the world of soul-crushing leadership behaviors. I’m confident in our vision and our approach. I know it’s what I’ve been put on this planet to do, and that I’ve partnered with the right person to make it happen.

And yet, despite my passionate desire to make an impact, I sometimes let my own fears get in the way of asking for what I need.

When someone tells me our approach has turned their results around, or how our book was the first time they saw lightbulbs going off in someone they are mentoring, or when someone shares the impact our keynote speech or workshop made on their association or company, I get suddenly shy.  “Err… thank you.”

When what I should be saying is “Thank you! Can you please help us spread the word so we can make bigger impact? Who else needs this message? Would you help with an introduction? Would you mind saying that in an Amazon review? We’re taking Winning Well to Asia this Spring, do you know companies over there that could benefit from Winning Well?”

In this short video I share my reflections on my own Pleaser tendencies during a hike on Camelback mountain.

Are You a Pleaser Manager?

So far of the many people taking our Winning Well assessment, the most frequent profile is the “Pleaser” type by a landslide. Click here to complete this FREE self-assessment and receive your free profile and recommendations.

If you really want to breakthrough, to change the game, to make a difference, you’re going to need as much help as you can get. If you don’t ask for what you need, results suffer. There’s nothing humble about putting your needs last.  The real irony is, when your own fear or desire to please trumps your ability to ask for support, you put the mission in jeopardy– nothing confident or humble about that.

5 Behaviors That Keep You From Getting Promoted

I run into them in every company I work with. Solid managers with real contributions. They work hard, they’re incredibly loyal, and they’ve been on the succession planning list forever. Much of the time they even have an MBA…AND they’re stuck. The promotions come and go. They’ve heard the pep talk so many times they can recite it in their sleep.

5 Behaviors That Keep You From Getting Promoted

Of course, there’s no easy way to know what’s holding any individual back. But I’ve done enough diagnosing, supporting, and helping to transform careers over the years that I’ve seen some consistent patterns. Don’t get stuck in these common traps.

  1. Relentless Self Promotion
    The minute people begin to think you’re more interested in your career than the organization’s mission you’re sunk. Do great work, find a sponsor, and stop tooting your own horn.
  2. Non Stop Energy
    Everyone loves a go-getter, do-it-all-fast kind of guy–at the frontline and middle manager level. But the time I spend in the C-Suites across a variety of industries reinforces what I’ve believed for a long time. Energy and intensity are great, but if you want to play with the big guys project an aura of calm, cool-headed control.
  3. Keeping Your Head Down
    You’re so focused on your team and your team’s results you miss the bigger picture. Work on strengthening your peripheral vision.
  4. Competing With Peers
    Real leadership takes more than being consistently at the top of the stack rank. Winning Well leaders know the important balance of results AND relationships. If it’s unlikely your peers will want to crack open some bubbly with you when you get that big promotion, chances are you may never get the chance to know.
  5. Inability to Let it Go
    Tenacity is one thing. But as they say, when the horse is dead, get off. Sometimes the answer is no, and you need to let it go. Winning Well leaders learn when to keep trying and when it’s time to move on (at least for the time being).

The Inspiration For This Post

One of my favorite clients has been using my Results That Last: 7 Roles Every Manager Must Master  program as the foundation for his mentoring circle work. Each week, they go through one module together, discuss the content and tools, and then they each go off and do the exercise with their teams before meeting again to review the next module.

Sometimes he brings in internal executives as guest speakers who are particularly good in the role they will be discussing that day. He’s also doing the 360 degree feedback tool twice, once at the beginning and once at the end of the program. I love the approach, and he’s seen a significant lift in business metrics. (If you want to learn more how you can use the course in this way, or other creative approaches, please call me on 443.750.1249.)

 As various questions comes up, he’s been batting them my way for additional perspective. I was intrigued by the one that came up last week.

 If we were coaching a person that has been a supervisor or leader for 10 plus years … What has held them back?  What characteristics have they been missing or overlooked? What haven’t they done that others have?  (The road map is not paved or golden? Or is it?)

More about my online courses can transform your results

Losing Well: 7 Questions to Ask When You Don't Get the Win

A Winning Well post with David Dye

In a recent Winning Well interview, Bob Morris asked “You talk about Winning Well, but what does it mean to lose well? David and I both laughed the kind of half-hearted chuckle that comes only after enough distance from the pain.

And as timing would have it, I’ve recently been helping both of my children process through disappointing losses on the college political front and the baseball field.

The truth is, you can’t win well, without losing well–repeatedly. If you’re not losing some of the time, you’re not winning.

Getting good at resilience and recovery is all part of the Winning Well game.

As we answered his questions, we began sharing stories of times we’d lost, and had to rally our teams in the midst of severe disappointment.

7 Questions to Ask When You Don’t Win–This Time

“I never thought of losing, but now that it’ s happened, the only thing is to do it right. That’s my obligation to all the people who believe in me. We all have to take defeats in life.” -Muhammad Ali

As with most leadership challenges, there’s hardly a better strategy for helping your team lose well than asking great questions. Here are a few questions to get you started.

  1. What are we feeling now and why? 
    Chances are this will be met with crickets–wait for it. Linger. Discuss. Process. Shut the door. Allow emotion. Before you open the door. It’s okay to share that you’re disappointed too, but do your best to role model a calm exploration and discussion of your feelings.
  2. What are we most proud of?
    Even the worst defeats generally come with moments of success, smart plays, and even ingenious effort. Help your team to step back and celebrate the elements of good.
  3. What must we do to show up as gracious losers?
    In order to win well the next time, it’s so important to not show up as bad sports. Help your team brainstorm the most important behaviors here. Perhaps it’s a congratulatory phone call or two, or a simple offering of “How can I help?” Remember Winning Well is a marathon.
  4. What can we learn here?
    This is the most important question, but resist the urge to jump in and start with this one. You’ll get better thinking if you start with 1 and 2.
  5. How can we invest in (and build bridges with) the winners?
    Our current political arena gives us plenty of examples of how to do this well–and how to screw it up.
  6. How do we stay focused on our MIT (Most Important Thing)?
    You may have lost a battle, but don’t give up on your bigger vision. This is a vital question to as before the final question…
  7. What’s next?
    It’s not over. Help your team craft a clear path forward.

When you’re the most frustrated, chances are, so is your team. Most situations get better with conversation.

resistance

5 Reasons You're Avoiding Your "I Don't Wanna" List (and what to do about it)

David Dye and I do truly strive to lead by example. So I wasn’t shocked the other day when my Winning Well co-author leveraged a practice straight out of chapter 20, thanking me for something I’d done to promote our Winning Well mission.

And then, hearkening back to chapter 7 (accountability), I laughed and said, “If I were really a good co-author I would have done ________ .” (it really doesn’t matter what this is, as I will here pull a Scarlett Ohara, and be sure to worry about that tomorrow).

David didn’t miss a beat, and said, “Oh I get it. It’s on your ‘I don’t wanna list.'”

Deep pause. It was. The next vital question was, ‘Why? Why was it there? What was the resistance? Why did I agree to do something I was avoiding?

5 Reasons You’re Avoiding Your “I Don’t Wanna” List (and what to do about it).

“The more important a call to action is to our soul’s evolution, the more Resistance we will feel about answering it. But to yield to Resistance deforms our spirit. It stunts us and makes us less than we are and were born to be.” – Steven Pressfield

In my experience there are five big  reasons something ends up on our “I Don’t Wanna List.” I’d love to hear what you would add.

  1. It’s a Damn Stupid Idea:  You hate the idea and everything around it. You’re against it at a core values level. The only thing dumber than putting this on your permanent avoid list, would be to actually cave.
    Next Step: Time to person-up. Use your words. Share your feelings. Before you do anything stupid, say what you mean– chances are any stupid idea attracts a swarm of naysayers just ready to buzz. Speak up. Others will follow.
  2. Your Values Say NO!!!! It’s a good idea in theory, but something about your values say “no.”
    Next Step: Listen to your heart… with an open mind. If it’s a real values clash– say so, and then be open to further explaining your rationale or removing yourself from the scene.
  3. You’re Annoyed: But it’s got to be done. We all have tasks that drive us crazy, but sometimes you’ve just got to do them.
    Next Step: Resist the urge to save them all for later. Knock out a few such tasks early in the day while you’re fresh.
  4. You’re Scared: Perhaps you’re afraid of screwing it up. Or maybe you’re worried about what others will think.
    Next Step: Consider what’s the worst thing that could happen. Chances are it’s not as bad as you think.
  5. You’re Stuck: You really don’t know what to do next
    Next Step: Ask yourself the Winning Well secret bonus question, “What would you do if you did know?” Let go of the pressure and brainstorm possible solutions with confidence.

We all have tasks we would rather avoid…. but when you can develop the discipline to know what must be done, and make it happen, you boost your energy and confidence for your Winning Well mission.

the winning well modelHave you taken our FREE Winning Well self-assessment? If not, click here. You can also download our FREE Winning Well toolkit.

If you’ve enjoyed Winning Well, we would appreciate your help in spreading the word through referrals and an Amazon review.

 

When to Break the Rules

I’m sitting next to Rick, a retired railroad engineer, on a delayed Southwest flight from Tampa to Baltimore. It’s been a LONG week of serial cancelled flights, and other travel frustrations. I’m wearing the same suit I wore in Detroit on Tuesday because I never did make it home between gigs.

Rick doesn’t seem to notice the wrinkles, as we begin swapping travel nightmare stories.

It was the middle of winter and the train was headed through a really rural section of upstate New York. The snow was coming down so hard you couldn’t see the sky, when the train stopped dead on the tracks—serious engine trouble. After several hours of waiting for help, it was clear we had a very long night ahead of us.

The café car ran out of food. The passengers were one Snickers bar short of a riot.

Jeff (whom Rick proudly pointed out he had trained), went to the café car attendant and said, we’ve got to solve this problem—people need to eat. Please give me some cash, I’m going to find food.

Jeff then trudged through the snow to the Kentucky Fried Chicken and said he needed 159 chicken dinners.

The kid behind the counter looked panicked, “Look, man, I want to help and I’ve got the chicken, but I don’t have enough staff to cook all that!”

Jeff smiled, “No worries, I used to work at a KFC. Let me just wash my hands and come back and help you.”

I can only imagine the eruption of applause as Jeff returned smelling of grease and salt, and began handing out free chicken.

It’s hard to be cranky with a drumstick in your hand.

Many customers took the time to write Amtrak with commendations. Amtrak fully supported his out of the box thinking.

Two weeks later his boss wrote him up for having his hat on crooked.

FREE Winning Well Assessment

winning well modelHave you taken our FREE Winning Well Assessment or Download our FREE toolkit? You’re just one click away.

If you’ve enjoyed reading Winning Well, we would really appreciate it if you would take time to leave a review. You can read what others are saying here.

Also be sure to check out our Winning Well e-course. It’s an extremely cost-effective way to reinforce and apply the Winning Well concepts and tools.

What Your Team Is Saying Behind Your Back

Have you ever talked about your boss behind your back? If you haven’t complained to at least someone…you’re a saint. Call me. I’m sure you’ve got some wisdom we can share here at LGL.

For the rest of us… you know… right? Just like you’re complaining about that boss who (you might even like a lot of the time) has behaviors you wish they would improve–SOON.  And chances are you haven’t told them.

Here’s the real deal. No matter how wonderful you are, I guarantee you, your team is talking about you (in some way that would surprise you) too.

How do I know this? Well, in addition to all the barrage of stories I hear from the companies I work with, the classroom full of MBA students who attended my Managing Difficult People elective all have one thing in common. Despite the advertised name of the class, guess who 100% are there to talk about? Yup. You guessed it. The inapproachable “jerk” who is their boss. As we dig in, he’s never that bad. #justsaying #letmehelp

That’s the spirit behind Winning Well. No one leads in a soul sucking way on purpose.  David Dye and I are on a mission to help you (and your bosses and your direct reports) lead better.

Sure it’s hard. You and your bosses are sandwiched between all kinds of competing priorities. And it’s tricky to think about how to do it right.

But it can also be made much easier by learning some extremely practical tools and techniques (this is a 2 minute video).

I promise you. A little bit of quality leadership development is worth the investment.

If you haven’t downloaded a FREE chapter of Winning Well, accessed the free toolkit, or taken the free online assessment, click here to get started. 

If you just want to talk for an hour (my dime) about why you’re a Winning Well leader or areas you’re looking to improve please contact my awesome assistant, Beth at beth@letsgrowleaders.com and she will get something scheduled.

I know we can help. And we have a wide range of solutions for every budget, including our newly released Winning Well online course.

How To Create a More Optimistic Workplace

You can’t win well if you’re not optimistic. And one of the most important parts of being a Winning Well leader is inspiring confidence that the scene and results can and will improve–and identifying the vital behaviors to make it so.

Today, I share a video interview with my friend and kindred spirit on the Winning Well journey, Shawn Murphy. Shawn’s book, The Optimistic Workplace, is so completely aligned with Winning Well, that our Kindle version comes with a link to some free chapters of his book.

In this 20 minute interview, Shawn shares a bit about his philosophy as well as practical approaches to making your workplace (or team) more optimistic.

“Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope and confidence.” – Helen Keller

When a workplace is optimistic you…

  • have hope that something good is going to come from your work.
  • have an understanding of the bigger picture, not just the day to day stuff.
  • focus on what’s possible and what’s right.
  • believe you can make an impact.

“My optimism wears heavy boots and is loud.” – Henry Rollins

Optimism starts with confidence that a brighter future is possible, and the humility to know that it’s worth the struggle. David and I are grateful for Shawn and others fighting for healthier workplace climates that lead to lasting results.