Alex’s Lemonade Stand: Leadership And Kids

Kids can, and do, make a leadership difference in their community every day.

My nephew, Jared Herr and his friend Caton Raffesperger, have raised over $28,000 for Alex’s Lemonade Stand through their independence day lemonade stand in Gettysburg, PA.

They share Alex’s story and their own journey in this short video.

As Gettysburg celebrates the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, they’re hoping to set a weekend record. To make a donation visit their site  or text an anonymous $10, by texting Lemonade 112680 to 85944.

Happy 4th of July.

You may also enjoy:

The Top Three Leadership Lessons from the Battle of Gettysbug
Democracy- 5 Ways You Can Make It More Meaningful
Why Volunteering Makes You a Better Leader
Leadership and Kids: The Best Way to Teach Your Kids About Leadership

*Photo Lemon Aid by Larry Kohlenstein

Alex's Lemonade Stand: Leadership And Kids

Kids can, and do, make a leadership difference in their community every day.

My nephew, Jared Herr and his friend Caton Raffesperger, have raised over $28,000 for Alex’s Lemonade Stand through their independence day lemonade stand in Gettysburg, PA.

They share Alex’s story and their own journey in this short video.

As Gettysburg celebrates the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, they’re hoping to set a weekend record. To make a donation visit their site  or text an anonymous $10, by texting Lemonade 112680 to 85944.

Happy 4th of July.

You may also enjoy:

The Top Three Leadership Lessons from the Battle of Gettysbug
Democracy- 5 Ways You Can Make It More Meaningful
Why Volunteering Makes You a Better Leader
Leadership and Kids: The Best Way to Teach Your Kids About Leadership

*Photo Lemon Aid by Larry Kohlenstein

Future’s Bright: Preparing Today’s Kids to Lead Tomorrow

Throughout June, Great Place to Work is hosting a blog-a-thon focused on the workplace of the future. They invited “workplace leaders, strategists, managers, employees, pundits, and all who care about creating great workplaces to envision the great workplace of the future.”

We were asked to “contemplate how workplaces will function in 10, 15, or 25 years, and what will make them great.” From my angle the future starts by preparing our kids.

5 Ways To Prepare Today’s Kids To Lead Tomorrow’s Workforce

How will we prepare our little ones for great leadership in tomorrow’s workforce? The future requires creativity, technical savvy, and most importantly the ability to create connections between people and ideas.

The future global economy requires these competencies for kids in developed and remote areas around the globe. As technology spreads, so must the learning.

In an interview with the Washington Post, renowned futurist, Ray Kurzweil, shares his predictions on the speed of global technology adoption.

“Everything was slow in the “old” days – the rate of change as well as the ability and tools people had to accommodate change. Both sides of the equation are much faster today. People can (and are) becoming “Internet savvy” very quickly. It doesn’t take long. The Web and mobile technology [are] invading the entire world including Africa at a very fast pace. Look how quickly Asia has adapted.”

The future is speeding toward us. Help our kids prepare.

5 Ways To Prepare Kid’s To Lead The Future

  1. Build Character – The future requires great human beings. Integrity, compassion, work ethic, servant leadership…these characteristics become even more vital with powerful tools and global reach. Reputations can be destroyed overnight through social media. Words last.
  2. Expanding Communities – The concept of community is rapidly changing. We must teach our kids to build responsible and valuable online relationships. Connect around areas of common interest. Proactively learn from global experts. Actively contribute as thought leaders to these discussions. The internet provides a powerful voice to the young and powerless. Build an online network to leverage for future leadership.
  3. Sustainability – As the planet continues to suffer from abuses and misuses, the companies of the future will have greater responsibility and more pressure for sustainable practices. Teach kids now about caring for the planet and show them their ideas and actions matter.
  4. Purposeful Learning – With so much information available from so many sources, we must teach kids to proactively mine for the data they need–making connections and drawing conclusions. Homework must evolve. No more fill in the blanks. Memorizing is mute. In the future, employees will not be “trained,” rather taught how to think and use resources. Build these competencies now.
  5. Focus – Future technology invites increased opportunities for multi-tasking. Multi-tasking invites distraction. Role model and teach kids how to prioritize, focus, pause, and build deep and connected relationships.
  6. What would you add?

Future's Bright: Preparing Today's Kids to Lead Tomorrow

Throughout June, Great Place to Work is hosting a blog-a-thon focused on the workplace of the future. They invited “workplace leaders, strategists, managers, employees, pundits, and all who care about creating great workplaces to envision the great workplace of the future.”

We were asked to “contemplate how workplaces will function in 10, 15, or 25 years, and what will make them great.” From my angle the future starts by preparing our kids.

5 Ways To Prepare Today’s Kids To Lead Tomorrow’s Workforce

How will we prepare our little ones for great leadership in tomorrow’s workforce? The future requires creativity, technical savvy, and most importantly the ability to create connections between people and ideas.

The future global economy requires these competencies for kids in developed and remote areas around the globe. As technology spreads, so must the learning.

In an interview with the Washington Post, renowned futurist, Ray Kurzweil, shares his predictions on the speed of global technology adoption.

“Everything was slow in the “old” days – the rate of change as well as the ability and tools people had to accommodate change. Both sides of the equation are much faster today. People can (and are) becoming “Internet savvy” very quickly. It doesn’t take long. The Web and mobile technology [are] invading the entire world including Africa at a very fast pace. Look how quickly Asia has adapted.”

The future is speeding toward us. Help our kids prepare.

5 Ways To Prepare Kid’s To Lead The Future

  1. Build Character – The future requires great human beings. Integrity, compassion, work ethic, servant leadership…these characteristics become even more vital with powerful tools and global reach. Reputations can be destroyed overnight through social media. Words last.
  2. Expanding Communities – The concept of community is rapidly changing. We must teach our kids to build responsible and valuable online relationships. Connect around areas of common interest. Proactively learn from global experts. Actively contribute as thought leaders to these discussions. The internet provides a powerful voice to the young and powerless. Build an online network to leverage for future leadership.
  3. Sustainability – As the planet continues to suffer from abuses and misuses, the companies of the future will have greater responsibility and more pressure for sustainable practices. Teach kids now about caring for the planet and show them their ideas and actions matter.
  4. Purposeful Learning – With so much information available from so many sources, we must teach kids to proactively mine for the data they need–making connections and drawing conclusions. Homework must evolve. No more fill in the blanks. Memorizing is mute. In the future, employees will not be “trained,” rather taught how to think and use resources. Build these competencies now.
  5. Focus – Future technology invites increased opportunities for multi-tasking. Multi-tasking invites distraction. Role model and teach kids how to prioritize, focus, pause, and build deep and connected relationships.
  6. What would you add?

9 Ways to Maximize Your College Leadership Experience

9 Ways to Maximize Your College Leadership Experience

I’m often asked which colleges are the best for “leadership.” The short answer is “most will do just fine.” As with most of life, it’s what you make of it. College is a great place to grow as a leader, but it’s up to you to maximize your college leadership experience.

Much of your leadership learning will come from peripheral aspects of the college experience. Being involved. Living with strangers. Leading without authority. Getting along in diverse groups. Projects with assigned (potentially lazy) teams. Live it deeply. Make mistakes. Try new approaches. Keep leading and learning.

This post is for my son, Ben, and other young leaders graduating high school and heading to college. I’ve collected advice from seasoned leaders across the globe. If you aren’t headed to college, please comment with your advice, and pass the post along to an aspiring young leader.

Annette Schmeling, VP of Student Development at the University of Dayton, suggests making a specific plan.

  • Focus first on Academic Success
  • Identify 3-5 “activities outside the classroom” to be involved in. List the activities, explain why they are important to you
  • Make connections with the career services office and learn about internships and professional development opportunities starting the freshmen year
  • Learn how to utilize social media tools to engage with others. Start early to establish a purpose-fueled online reputation

9 Ways to Maximize Your College Leadership Experience (advice from the online “village”)

1. Solve Problems

Find something you’re passionate about and work to improve it. Dan Rockwell suggests, “gathering together” with other students to solve problems in order to maximize your college leadership experience.

2. Take Risks

Get comfortable with discomfort. Don’t jump out of the 2nd story classroom (like my friend did at Wake Forest did–  it was a stupid stunt, but he’s fine), but do wise things that scare you. Will Lukang says, “take risks and push yourself out of your comfort zone.” Mario Marquez shares, “Look for the uncomfortable and controversial situations, the hot potatoes that the majority will stay away from.”

3. Learn who you are

You will do great things and many silly ones. Learn from it all. Keep reflecting on, and refining, your values. Learn to lead and lead to learn. And as Alaska Chick says, “Walk the talk and do what you say.”

4. Volunteer

The most consistent advice I received is “volunteer.” Get involved. Spend time in the community. One of the very best way’s to maximize your college leadership experience is to volunteer.

“Get involved in the college’s outreach programs. Most colleges have programs to tutor high school students who are not passing graduation exams, community clean-up programs, political activist groups, debate groups, open theater programs get involved. Being in college can be about so much more than just getting a degree for what’s next.”

5. Build a Network

Hang out with all kinds of people. Find your niches, but don’t limit yourself. That weird guy may be up to something fantastic. It’s great to build a network of diverse communities. Network extensively through social media and make genuine connections. Mike Henry, Sr. suggests, “select friends carefully.”

“Grow your leadership skills in the place that sparks your passion – opportunities are everywhere. If you don’t feel the click, keep exploring until you do.”

6. Learn Extra

Attend the free lectures. Take crazy courses unrelated to your major. Listen with your heart. Take a full course load. Stay up late talking with your friends about what they are learning. Donald George suggests, “develop a variety of leadership skills and apply the most appropriate approach to fit that specific situation.”

7. Find Mentors

Invest in getting to know your professors. I have a few lifelong mentors (now friends) that began as professors. Help them with their research. Drink coffee with them. You will be amazed at the opportunities that can emerge. Also, find mentors in the community and in areas of interest. Connect with mentors across all walks of life.

“Find leaders you look up to and ask them to mentor you. Serve on their teams so as to watch, observe, and learn. Work hard, build good relationships, and after your studies are done, volunteer your heart out.”

8. Learn Think, Write and Speak

Take classes that challenge you to organize and articulate your point of view. Take lots of writing and speaking classes. Consider an improv or other theater class. Get really comfortable in front of people. If you hate public speaking, keep taking classes until you don’t.

9. Work Hard

Dan McCarthy shared a combination of quotes from Chuck Yeager and Vince Lombardi: “There’s no such thing as a natural-born leader. All great leaders got that way from hard work, not from some endowed gift. Thank goodness. Don’t cheat yourself with the easy way out. Or as Pop Pop says:

“I still endorse the advice from the talk “What college is and what it isn’t ” I heard in my senior year of high school in 1959 from the vice president of Rensselaer Polytechnic.
His point: you need to have a goal that motivates you, and apply yourself passionately in pursuing the goal. It does not matter if you change your goal later on, you probably will, several times. What matters is that you do the best you can with what you are working toward at any given time. I think that advice holds up, in college and after. The connection to leadership? If you know where you are going and give it your all, you will find folks will follow your lead.”

@theteapixie summarizes it well.

@LetsGrowLeaders Get involved. Be an example worth emulating. Be engaged. Be interested. Be active. Make face-2-face happen.”

 Are you looking to make the most of  your college leadership experience? Know someone graduating and headed to college? A Free Subscription to Let’s Grow Leaders makes a wonderful gift for Grads.. and Dads)

Orchestra Without a Conductor

This was a farewell. The last concert of the year for the high-school orchestra. The seniors wore roses and beamed with personality.

The conductor held up his baton, and the music began. Powerful. Brilliant. Exciting. A send-off to the next phase of their lives.

Then he looked at the orchestra and grinned. He stepped off the podium stage right, folded his arms, and watched from the sidelines. 5 measures later, he looked at the audience. Smiled with confidence, and walked off the stage. He never came back.
The orchestra continued. Powerful. Brilliant. More exciting. I sat mesmerized by the leadership moment. They didn’t miss a beat. They were performing– without their leader. Or were they?

He left confident that…

  • the vision was understood
  • they had a game plan
  • they were accomplished players
  • who had practiced
  • and would listen to one another

His confidence said…

  • I believe in you
  • You’re ready for the next phase
  • It was never about me
  • Go be brilliant

No conductor. Powerful leader.

Moms Growing Leaders: A Mother’s Day Tribute

If you ask my mom if she’s a leader, she’ll say “no.” And then, everyone who knows her will just shake their heads and laugh. People follow leaders toward a vision. Leaders serve. Leaders grow leaders. My mom’s a leader. She’s grown a nice crop.

Moms Growing Leaders

Some moms hold formal leadership roles. Others do not. Either way, don’t underestimate the impact. Over the last few weeks, I’ve been asking successful leaders what their moms taught them about leadership. Some great insights shared below.

In the spirit of Mother’s Day, take a minute to reflect. What did your mom teach you about leadership? Share in the comments more importantly, if you still can, tell your mom. Don’t assume she understands the impact.

What Moms Taught Us

“My mother taught me about creativity and passion for what you do. My grandmother taught me perseverance and hard work while always finding the joy (and a smile) in the moment. My great aunt taught me to respect the wisdom and the work of those who came before who put you in the position you are. My great great grandmother taught me that anything is possible when you put your mind to it, no matter what the circumstances. A long way to say – I have had great teachers.”
~Kahina Van Dyke, Global Women’s Executive Leadership Council

Your Moms Themes

Lead with Love

  • “Mom my always gave us kids a lot of hugs and kisses and told us all the time how much she loved us”
  • “Care”

Integrity

  • “Integrity and ownership!!! Good, Bad, or Indifferent, you speak the truth and own your situation.”
  • “Always do what is right even if it seems to be the hardest thing at the time.”

Perceive

  • “She mentored her children to reach and achieve.”
  • “Never lose hope.”
  • “There’s always a way.”
  • “Sometimes great things happen, sometimes bad things happen in either case, you must persevere & not spend too much time congratulating yourself or fretting.”

Facing Your Fears

  • “My mom taught me, most of all, unbeknownst to her, that being vulnerable is part of who you are. You can be a hard worker, dedicated and passionate, confidant and experienced, but you can still be vulnerable in so many ways. I am learning to be able to embrace that.”
  • “I have optic nerve damage. My mother, Audrey, taught me never to be ashamed of a disability. She taught me self-advocacy. She taught me to never use my vision (or lack thereof) as an excuse. She never treated me as “disabled”. When she died at 44 of pancreatic cancer, she taught me how to fight like hell against the odds and how to accept defeat gracefully.”
  • “Suck it up and be a young lady instead of a whinny baby. That stuck with me all my life and made me strong and determined to make things better”

Practical Advice

  • “Never fight about money. If that’s what it’s about and it’s going to be messy, walk away.”
  • “Delegate responsibility”
  • Practice makes perfect
  • “Give the respect and get the respect from other”
  • “Relax, a good night sleep solves all standing problems”
  • “Focus on the highest priority first.”

Lead Through Action

  • “Actions can be the most powerful leadership tools and that it’s not just about saying the right things – it’s about walking the talk and implementing.”
  • “Mom,Thank you for using all your domestic appliances like broom,sandals, roti makers etc to harp on your points to win over against mine.Thank you Mom! That’s why I am what I am today!”
  • “Be present and engaged.”

Need a Mother’s Day gift? How about a free subscription to Let’s Grow Leaders 😉
Your turn: what did your mom teach you about leadership?

Moms Growing Leaders: A Mother's Day Tribute

If you ask my mom if she’s a leader, she’ll say “no.” And then, everyone who knows her will just shake their heads and laugh. People follow leaders toward a vision. Leaders serve. Leaders grow leaders. My mom’s a leader. She’s grown a nice crop.

Moms Growing Leaders

Some moms hold formal leadership roles. Others do not. Either way, don’t underestimate the impact. Over the last few weeks, I’ve been asking successful leaders what their moms taught them about leadership. Some great insights shared below.

In the spirit of Mother’s Day, take a minute to reflect. What did your mom teach you about leadership? Share in the comments more importantly, if you still can, tell your mom. Don’t assume she understands the impact.

What Moms Taught Us

“My mother taught me about creativity and passion for what you do. My grandmother taught me perseverance and hard work while always finding the joy (and a smile) in the moment. My great aunt taught me to respect the wisdom and the work of those who came before who put you in the position you are. My great great grandmother taught me that anything is possible when you put your mind to it, no matter what the circumstances. A long way to say – I have had great teachers.”
~Kahina Van Dyke, Global Women’s Executive Leadership Council

Your Moms Themes

Lead with Love

  • “Mom my always gave us kids a lot of hugs and kisses and told us all the time how much she loved us”
  • “Care”

Integrity

  • “Integrity and ownership!!! Good, Bad, or Indifferent, you speak the truth and own your situation.”
  • “Always do what is right even if it seems to be the hardest thing at the time.”

Perceive

  • “She mentored her children to reach and achieve.”
  • “Never lose hope.”
  • “There’s always a way.”
  • “Sometimes great things happen, sometimes bad things happen in either case, you must persevere & not spend too much time congratulating yourself or fretting.”

Facing Your Fears

  • “My mom taught me, most of all, unbeknownst to her, that being vulnerable is part of who you are. You can be a hard worker, dedicated and passionate, confidant and experienced, but you can still be vulnerable in so many ways. I am learning to be able to embrace that.”
  • “I have optic nerve damage. My mother, Audrey, taught me never to be ashamed of a disability. She taught me self-advocacy. She taught me to never use my vision (or lack thereof) as an excuse. She never treated me as “disabled”. When she died at 44 of pancreatic cancer, she taught me how to fight like hell against the odds and how to accept defeat gracefully.”
  • “Suck it up and be a young lady instead of a whinny baby. That stuck with me all my life and made me strong and determined to make things better”

Practical Advice

  • “Never fight about money. If that’s what it’s about and it’s going to be messy, walk away.”
  • “Delegate responsibility”
  • Practice makes perfect
  • “Give the respect and get the respect from other”
  • “Relax, a good night sleep solves all standing problems”
  • “Focus on the highest priority first.”

Lead Through Action

  • “Actions can be the most powerful leadership tools and that it’s not just about saying the right things – it’s about walking the talk and implementing.”
  • “Mom,Thank you for using all your domestic appliances like broom,sandals, roti makers etc to harp on your points to win over against mine.Thank you Mom! That’s why I am what I am today!”
  • “Be present and engaged.”

Need a Mother’s Day gift? How about a free subscription to Let’s Grow Leaders 😉
Your turn: what did your mom teach you about leadership?

Are You Developing Your Team's Mutant Powers?

In some organizations its standard practice to “groom” leaders to adapt to corporate norms. We teach future leaders to speak so they can be heard. We encourage rising stars to capture their ideas just right in the perfect Powerpoint template. We teach them when, where, and with whom to share their ideas. I work hard to develop these skills on my team (and in fact am writing about how to “speak to be heard” tomorrow). The corporate world does not have much appetite for “mutant” gifts.

Is there a cost to such conformity? Those with more quirky personalities and styles seldom rise to the top in favor of those who look better in a gray suit. Does all the time spent on fitting in and honing the standard leadership skills, distract us from developing the unique and more edgy gifts that could lead to creative breakthroughs?

Mutants and Leadership?

“If you are using half of your power of concentration to look normal, than you are only half paying attention to everything else you are doing.”
~Magneto (a powerful mutant)

This weekend my son, Sebastian approached me excitedly, “Mom, you’ve got to see this movie. I think it has something to do with leadership.” My mind quickly raced through all the possible movies he could be considering. I was excited to spend that brisk Saturday afternoon snuggled up watching a movie and talking about leadership. And then he revealed his selection.“X-Men: First Class.” I groaned, but settled in. Sometimes you have to meet growing leaders where they are.

It’s not a “must see,” so if you missed it, I’ll save you some time. The world is full of interesting “genetic mutants” with amazing, yet underdeveloped powers (telepathy, teleportation, shape shifting). These mutants work to disguise their mutant powers, working to fit in, to “feel normal.” When under stress, the mutant powers overtake their ability to control them and they come out in awkward in dangerous ways. Until, one day, they find each other and a fellow mutant serves as their mentor helping them to not only to reveal and embrace their gifts, but to refine them.

“Mutant” Gifts

  • What unique gifts are hidden on your team?
  • Do these “mutant” gifts come out in clumsy ways?
  • What if you could help them to refine these special powers?
  • What are we missing by honing the more commonly accepted talents?
  • How much of own developmental energy is spent on “looking normal” versus becoming exceptional?

Are You Developing Your Team’s Mutant Powers?

In some organizations its standard practice to “groom” leaders to adapt to corporate norms. We teach future leaders to speak so they can be heard. We encourage rising stars to capture their ideas just right in the perfect Powerpoint template. We teach them when, where, and with whom to share their ideas. I work hard to develop these skills on my team (and in fact am writing about how to “speak to be heard” tomorrow). The corporate world does not have much appetite for “mutant” gifts.

Is there a cost to such conformity? Those with more quirky personalities and styles seldom rise to the top in favor of those who look better in a gray suit. Does all the time spent on fitting in and honing the standard leadership skills, distract us from developing the unique and more edgy gifts that could lead to creative breakthroughs?

Mutants and Leadership?

“If you are using half of your power of concentration to look normal, than you are only half paying attention to everything else you are doing.”
~Magneto (a powerful mutant)

This weekend my son, Sebastian approached me excitedly, “Mom, you’ve got to see this movie. I think it has something to do with leadership.” My mind quickly raced through all the possible movies he could be considering. I was excited to spend that brisk Saturday afternoon snuggled up watching a movie and talking about leadership. And then he revealed his selection.“X-Men: First Class.” I groaned, but settled in. Sometimes you have to meet growing leaders where they are.

It’s not a “must see,” so if you missed it, I’ll save you some time. The world is full of interesting “genetic mutants” with amazing, yet underdeveloped powers (telepathy, teleportation, shape shifting). These mutants work to disguise their mutant powers, working to fit in, to “feel normal.” When under stress, the mutant powers overtake their ability to control them and they come out in awkward in dangerous ways. Until, one day, they find each other and a fellow mutant serves as their mentor helping them to not only to reveal and embrace their gifts, but to refine them.

“Mutant” Gifts

  • What unique gifts are hidden on your team?
  • Do these “mutant” gifts come out in clumsy ways?
  • What if you could help them to refine these special powers?
  • What are we missing by honing the more commonly accepted talents?
  • How much of own developmental energy is spent on “looking normal” versus becoming exceptional?

Children’s Advice For President Obama

What advice do you have for President Obama?

We’ve been asking kids for their advice for Obama since the election results came in.

We asked them to consider…

  • What would you say to the President to help him with his next term?
  • If you were President what would you change?
  • In one word, what is the most important leadership quality for the President?

13 year old producer, Jared Herr, (pictured bottom right with Steven Spielberg) assembled their advice for President Obama into a short video.

 Please click on the following path.  Lets Grow Leaders Film.

I know I have readers of all political persuasions and social views. Some of these views are controversial. Thank goodness– diversity of thought helps us all grow as leaders. Some of you may have voted for President Obama. Others likely did not. Others of you are not in the United States. You will want to watch anyway, these kids are cute.

Many of the views represented here will be aligned with your core values. Others may not.

Either way, I encourage your to watch the video with your children, and record their comments in the comments section (feel free to include your advice as well).

Talking with our children about leadership and values is one of the best ways to help them grow as leaders.

Please also pass this post along to your social media friends, so we can collect as much advice as possible. All views welcome.

***
Jared Herr is 13 years old and in 7th grade. When he’s not producing films, he likes to play basketball, swim, and act. He uses his leadership to raise funds for Alex’s Lemonade stand, a charity that helps to find a cure for pediatric cancer. He and his friend have raised over $25,000 dollars for cancer research.

 

Children's Advice For President Obama

What advice do you have for President Obama?

We’ve been asking kids for their advice for Obama since the election results came in.

We asked them to consider…

  • What would you say to the President to help him with his next term?
  • If you were President what would you change?
  • In one word, what is the most important leadership quality for the President?

13 year old producer, Jared Herr, (pictured bottom right with Steven Spielberg) assembled their advice for President Obama into a short video.

 Please click on the following path.  Lets Grow Leaders Film.

I know I have readers of all political persuasions and social views. Some of these views are controversial. Thank goodness– diversity of thought helps us all grow as leaders. Some of you may have voted for President Obama. Others likely did not. Others of you are not in the United States. You will want to watch anyway, these kids are cute.

Many of the views represented here will be aligned with your core values. Others may not.

Either way, I encourage your to watch the video with your children, and record their comments in the comments section (feel free to include your advice as well).

Talking with our children about leadership and values is one of the best ways to help them grow as leaders.

Please also pass this post along to your social media friends, so we can collect as much advice as possible. All views welcome.

***
Jared Herr is 13 years old and in 7th grade. When he’s not producing films, he likes to play basketball, swim, and act. He uses his leadership to raise funds for Alex’s Lemonade stand, a charity that helps to find a cure for pediatric cancer. He and his friend have raised over $25,000 dollars for cancer research.