innovation and creativity at work

Innovation and Creativity at Work: A Frontline Festival

Are you searching for ways to bring more innovation and creativity to your team? In this month’s Frontline Festival, thought leaders from around the world share their insights on how to foster innovation at work.

Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors!

Next month’s Frontline Festival is all about employee engagement. New contributors always welcome. Submit your relevant blog posts here!

Innovation and Creativity in Customer Service

Chip Bell of Chip Bell Group (in the Inc. article, How to ‘Kaleidoscope’ Your Customers reminds us that today’s customers do not talk (remark) or tweet about good service; only experiences they find unique, special, and ingenious. Research shows value-added (taking what customers expect and adding more) will not provide a solid ROI. But, value-unique (delivering an unexpected, compelling surprise) creates animated advocates and fuels bottom line impact. Follow Chip.

As technology advances, you must innovate certain aspects of your business, too. Because so much communication takes place online, in-person customer service is limited.  Kaylee Riley of Patriot Software, LLC inspires us to come up with creative ways to provide excellent (and personal) customer service when we communicate with customers online.  Follow Kaylee.

Innovation & Critical Thinking

Own the UglySusan Mazza of Random Acts of Leadership  shares why positive thinking isn’t enough. In fact, sometimes we need a more realistic view of reality to create positive movement and action. Sometimes what may occur as “negative” is actually a very good thing for business. Follow Susan.

According to Ken Downer of Rapid Start Leadership to lead well you have to be able to think creatively and independently. The good news is that thinking is a skill; these 25 ideas will help you sharpen those thinking skills and improve your chances to succeed as a leader. Follow Ken

Tanveer Naseer of Tanveer Naseer Leadership helps us learn about the neurological mechanisms that can impede your employees’ creativity and ability to collaborate. He gives us three strategies leaders can employ to overcome these impediments. Follow Tanveer.

Sean Glaze of Great Results Teambuilding  posits that as complicated as sometimes we try to make it sound, innovation is most often either a MODIFICATION of an existing idea or the MARRIAGE of two existing ideas in a new or unexpected way… consider this very simple equation: NI = OI + YI.  Follow Sean.

Wendy Dailey of My Dailey Journey shares that in order for HR to help eliminate the salary gap, we need to change how we look at compensation and stop asking for salary history.  Follow Wendy.

Innovation Through Collaboration

“Innovation has nothing to do with how many R & D dollars you have. When Apple came up with the Mac, IBM was spending at least 100 times more on R & D. It’s not about money. It’s about the people you have, how you’re led, and how much you get it.”
– 
Steve Jobs

There is no innovation and creativity without failure. Period. Brene Brown
Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/topics/innovation

Jon Mertz of Thin Difference offers that we’re at the tipping point of a new era of leadership. leaving stale leaders behind. The big change required is better collaboration and productive problem-solving. To get smart citizens, we need smart leadersFollow Jon.

Julie Winkle Giulioni of DesignArounds tells us that a key prerequisite for creativity and innovation is curiosity.  This post explores what it is and how to leverage it for improved results. Follow Julie

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates takes an innovative look at the role of feelings in the workplace. Follow Shelley

Encouraging Innovation

“There is no innovation and creativity without failure. Period.”
Brene Brown

According to David Grossman of The Grossman Group  research published by the Harvard Business Review on fostering innovation within companies underscores the value of encouraging employees to be decision-makers. Read on to find out what the most successful innovation leaders do to foster innovation in their teams. Follow David.

John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement advises we make sure people have time, encouragement and freedom to pursue their passion. Far too often managers spend their time dealing with problems: problems with employees, and dealing with internal politics. Shift priorities so we instead prioritize creating space for people to flourish with other things being done if there is time.  Follow John.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership provides questions, answers, and the four commandments of creativity and innovation. Follow Wally.

Jesse Stoner of Seapoint Center for Collaborative Leadership shares: Your questions are more important than your answers. In your role as a leader, before jumping to a conclusion, ask questions that increase possibilities and creativity like “What don’t we know yet?”  Follow Jesse.

Are you a leadership blogger? We would love to have you join us in the next Frontline Festival. New contributors are always welcome.

Frontline Festival: Leaders Share about Strategy and Alignment

Welcome to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival on Strategy and Alignment. We asked thought leaders from around the world to share their very best post on strategy.

Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors!

Next month’s Frontline Festival is all about inspiring innovation and creativity. New contributors always welcome. Submit your relevant blog posts here!

Including Your Team and Customers in Strategic Planning Efforts

According to Jesse Stoner of Seapoint Center for Collaborative Leadership, one of the biggest mistakes leaders make is thinking they are supposed to have all the answers, especially when it comes to vision and strategy. There is a natural desire to look like you are smart and know what you’re doing,, but sometimes the smartest thing you can do is to involve your team. Here are eight guidelines to help you do it right.  Follow Jesse.

improve customer servicePaul LaRue of The UPwards Leader notices that many companies limit the amount of feedback they receive from customers and/or employees. Sometimes it’s an oversight; many times it’s deliberate to truncate open constructive discussion. Follow Paul

Ensuring Organizational Capacity to Execute Your Strategy

John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement reminds us that it is important to plan well and to align the organization to successfully turn a strategy into action. Too little focus is given to building the capability of the organization to execute on the strategy. Lofty ideas without capability are not of much use, but the ability to execute strategy throughout the organization is powerful. Follow John.

Skip Prichard of Leadership Insights shares that no matter what process is used for strategy development, a strategic talent assessment is needed before “dropping the flag” on execution. There can be no achievement, nor alignment, without the right people in place.  Follow Skip.

According to Julie Winkle Giulioni of DesignArounds,  strategic alignment is a driving force for successful organizations. One thing exceptional leaders do is use ongoing performance dialogue to ensure that everyone is rowing in the same direction. Julie shares ways to supplement (or replace) the traditional performance appraisal process to keep your team aligned and executing your strategy well. Follow Julie

Leadership is a potent combination of strategy and character. But if you must be without one, be without the strategy.
-Norman Schwarzkopf

Susan Mazza of Random Acts of Leadership shares that learning to work smarter, not just harder is a surefire way to accelerate and even amplify your success. However, there is a big difference between believing you can avoid hard work if you work smarter and knowing that working smarter will help ensure your hard work will pay off.  Follow Susan.

Ken Downer of Rapid Start Leadership gives us a bizarre social experiment reminiscent of Lord of the Flies, which sheds light on what it takes for leaders to unite a group of people and get them all pulling together. Follow Ken

Rachel Gray of Patriot Software, LLC  notes that in 2018, you might be looking for new strategies to drive customers to your small business. Creating a powerful and unique website that aligns with your business brand is a great strategy to increase customer traffic and, in turn, sales. Follow Rachel.

Simplify

The essence of strategy is choosing what not to do.”  —Michael Porter

Mind the MIT Let's Grow LeadersWally Bock of Three Star Leadership reminds us that if you want people in your organization to align their actions with your strategy, keep your strategy simple. Boil it down to a slogan if you can. Follow Wally.

Michelle Cubas, CPCC, ACC, of Positive Potentials, LLC has noticed that people tend to see strategy in terms of goals and action items while the strategy is the map with the overall vision. To bring clarity she shares a dynamic concept that visualizes the strategic planning process.  Follow Michelle.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited  reveals a simple three word “strategy” that has guided her career for years.  Follow Beth.

Strategic Planning and Stepping Up to More

Wendy Dailey of My Dailey Journey relays that as she finds herself focusing more on networking & helping others, she thinks that a key to success is local groups. This post talks about stepping up to be a part of the bigger picture and engaging volunteers to build stronger professional organizations.   Follow Wendy.

Jon Mertz of Thin Difference reflects that some may view the past year with a sense of excitement while others view it as turmoil. In either view, finding our citizenship soul is critical. Follow Jon.

We’re always looking for new contributors to the Frontline Festival. If you’re a blogger, we welcome you to share your insights.

thought leaders best post of 2017

Thought Leaders Best Blog Posts of 2017: A Frontline Festival

Welcome to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival Best of 2017 Edition. We asked thought leaders from around the world to share their very best post of the year. We strategically didn’t define “best of,” but instead let contributors choose their own criteria. Some submitted their most popular post in terms of page views or social sharing, while others submitted the post that had the most personal meaning for them.

It was interesting to see the themes that emerged.  Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors!

Next month’s Frontline Festival is all about strategy and alignment. New contributors are always welcome. Submit your relevant blog posts here!

“Not only are bloggers suckers for the remarkable, so are the people who read blogs.” -Seth Godin

Inspirational and Reflection

Winning Well at SHRMNew to the Festival, Wendy Dailey of My Dailey Journey shares that 2017 has been eye-opening for her. Building her HR Tribe allowed her to be open to a new definition of success. Follow Wendy.

What we loved: First off, meeting Wendy at the SHRM conference, and experiencing her amazing energy and enthusiasm. I remember feeling that excited when starting my blog and seeing how quickly it attracted wonderful people to connect with. She’s doing a great job engaging her tribe.  I loved how she takes her tribe with her to experience events. 

Tanveer Naseer of Tanveer Naseer Leadership shares, “Some of the most popular pieces on my leadership blog revolve around stories I share that reveal a timely lesson on how to be better at leading others. It’s for this reason that my top post of 2017 revolves around a story – in this case, a story of one of my failures as a leader and the powerful lesson it gave rise to on the importance of effective listening.” Follow Tanveer.

What we loved: Tanveer’s vulnerability and sharing. No leader is perfect. Real growth comes from knowing that and working to improve.

Kaylee Riley of Patriot Software, LLC  notes that 2017 had its ups and downs for many business owners. For inspiration and insight on leadership, motivation, failure, and more, check out these helpful quotes, and get ready to tackle another great year!   Follow Kaylee.

What we loved:  “It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all, in which case you have failed by default.” —J.K. Rowling, author

David Grossman of The Grossman Group explains, “In developing my thoughts on 21st century communications, I pulled together the best-of-the-best strategies that work from our clients who are leading in the global communications arena, and from my travels.” The results are these Top Ten Principles for leaders, organizations, and communication professionalsFollow David.

What we loved: Principle #6: There’s a greater focus on self.  Before you can lead others, you need to first know and understand yourself.

Thought Leaders Reflect on Leadership Behaviors

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership warns, “Please don’t become a boss if…” and then gives us a WONDERFUL list of reasons supervisors struggle.  Follow Wally.

What we loved: The ENTIRE list. We’ve seen every one of these derailers.

Julie Winkle Giulioni of DesignArounds asks, “What’s the alternative to micromanagement? Macromanagement!”  It’s a way of dealing with employees and others that honors who they are and what they know, while at the same time driving engagement and sustainable results.  Follow Julie

What we loved: Julie’s straightforward chart outlining the differences in behaviors of “micro-manager and a macro-manager.”

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates gets back to the basics with this top leadership tip--something we’d all like to see more of in this world. Follow Shelley

What we loved: The reminder that being nice can go such a long way when leading other human beings.

Jon Mertz of Thin Difference reminds us that inciting and supporting continued chaos is not a sound leadership trait. A return to calmness is a leadership imperative that we embraced in 2017 and will continue to embrace in the coming years. Follow Jon.

What we loved:  We have enough chaos in the world.

  • Odd, divisive presidential tweets slam early in the morning.
  • Opioid and drug abuse rises. “Drug overdoses are now the leading cause of death among Americans under 50.”
  • Anxiety is up. “Over the past eight years, Google search rates for anxiety have more than doubled…”

We don’t need leaders creating chaos. We need leaders willing to solve the underlying issues to tame chaos.

Chip Bell of Chip Bell Group reminds us that after dark, all cats are leopards and shares what can a cat teach you about how to live life at the peak of success.  Follow Chip.

What we loved: This one was just fun! What a clever approach to talking about confidence and other success-inducing behaviors.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited shares one of her most popular posts of the year–which happens to coincide with something leaders should be doing a lot of.  Here’s How to Write a Meaningful Thank You NoteFollow Beth.

What we loved: Beth doesn’t just encourage us to write thank you notes; she gives a helpful structure on how to make them more meaningful.

Sean Glaze of Great Results Teambuilding admits that marathons are hard. And marathons are far more of an individual challenge than a team activity. So what does running a marathon have to do with you leading your team? A good bit, actually… Follow Sean.

What we loved: As a marathon-runner I totally get this! I know my marathons have made me a more disciplined and supportive leader.

Paul LaRue of The UPwards Leader  brings to mind that leadership principles are timeless, and great principles transcend generations and cultures. He gives us some applications taken from what my kids learn from their martial arts Sensei. Follow Paul

What we loved: Heroic Courage. “Bushidos never waver in the face of fear or the face of compromise. They hold fast to Principles. Heroic courage is not a bravery to bend or break rules, but courage to stand for them…”

John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement  posits that it seems that if there were better ways to manage, people would adopt those methods. But this just isn’t the case; sometimes better methods will be adopted but often they won’t. People can be very attached to the way things have always been doneFollow John.

What we loved: His question: How often is your organization losing out because better methods are ignored?

According to Alli Polin of Break the Frame, it’s easy to look the other way and assume that someone else will step up and get involved. What sets people apart are these five simple rules for your life and leadership.  Follow Alli.

What we loved: “Be someone who does what’s right, not only what’s easy.”

Jesse Stoner of Seapoint Center for Collaborative Leadership reminds us that just because someone has the title of “president” doesn’t mean they’re a leader. A leader is someone who people respect, who says, “Let’s go this way,” and people follow of their own volition. Follow Jesse.

What we loved: “A leader is the person who takes action. And others join in.”

Thought Leaders on Teamwork and Teambuilding

According to Paula Kiger of Big Green Pen, it’s an old cliche’ that “there is no ‘I’ in team,” but this version of the phrase, via a television reality show, brought humor to the idea. Turns out leadership shows up when something truly matters to us.  Follow Paula.

What we loved: Paula’s starting question, “When does something stop being a drill and begin being ‘real life?’ “

Chris Edmonds of Driving Results through Culture observes that we face a crisis of respect and civility in the US today  and gives us a solution.  Follow Chris.

What we love:  His reminder that the crises we’re seeing with sexual harassment and inappropriate behavior are not just with the rich and famous. “Incivility and disrespect play out every day in our homes, neighborhoods, workplaces, politics, and social media networks around the globe.”

Thought Leaders on Trust

Susan Mazza of Random Acts of Leadership offers that the conditions for trusting someone are very personal. In fact, despite how logical your assessments regarding trustworthiness may seem to you, it’s important to remember that not everyone takes the same approach.  Follow Susan.

What we loved: #5 of her 9 Actions to Build Trust, “honor your promises.”

“I use the word “honor” instead of “keep” your promises deliberately, because no one keeps all of their promises. Stuff happens and we are, after all, human. So this means EITHER do what you said you would do OR tell someone in advance of the due date that you can’t deliver. When you can’t deliver and you tell someone in advance, you can figure out together how to deal with the potential breakdown. That doesn’t count as keeping your promise, but it does honor your commitment and your relationship.”

Jon Verbeck of JonVerbeck.com  advises that all businesses big and small have great opportunities working with outside experts. We all develop our teams and being an outside expert, I understand it from both sides. This post describes some challenges and tips working with outside experts and consultants.  Follow Jon.

What we loved: his advice to help outside experts feel like they are part of the team. No one wants to feel like a “vendor.”

Thought Leaders on Conflict

Lisa Kohn from Chatsworth Consulting Group  presents Conflict is good – Five Ways to Make it Even Better! on The Thoughtful Leaders™ Blog where she presents a few simple, but not so easy, steps to take that can help make conflict more effective and productive. Follow Lisa.

What we loved: “We can get so caught up in the fight that we forget what we’re fighting for. And sometimes we’re fighting against each other, without realizing we’re fighting for the same thing.”

Won’t you join us?

We’d love to hear which posts resonated most with you (please leave a comment below). And we’re always looking for new contributors to the Festival!

the power of gratitude and appreciation

Gratitude and Appreciation: A November Frontline Festival

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival is about gratitude and appreciation. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors! Next month’s Frontline Festival is all about your best of 2017.  Submit your best blog post of the year here!

WHY GRATITUDE IS IMPORTANT

Skip Prichard of Leadership Insights  shares three steps to boost your thanksgiving quotient and 17 different benefits for a spirit of gratitude. Gratitude is one of the best ways to increase your success in the coming year. Follow Skip.

Tanveer Naseer of Tanveer Naseer Leadership gives us a look at how expressing gratitude can help leaders bring out the best in those they lead and drive their organizations to succeed. Follow Tanveer.

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING GRATEFUL FOR PEOPLE

“Piglet noticed that even though he had a Very Small Heart, it could hold a rather large amount of Gratitude.” A.A. Milne

John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement is thankful for the insight provided by his father on how to provide value through your work.  He says, “It seems to me we often neglect to appreciate how important it is for people to take pride in their work.  He gave me an early appreciation that while there are many factors influencing our decisions as we proceed through our careers, it is critical to do work that you are proud of.” Follow John.

Rachel Blakely of Patriot Software reminds us that during the holiday season and beyond, it’s important to step back and think about what you’re grateful for in your business. This year, let your customers know you’re thankful for them with these five tipsFollow Rachel.

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates recounts when a plane full of passengers erupted in appreciative applause.  Follow Shelley

Paula Kiger of Big Green Pen mentions thanks for the teachers in our lives, including people who “taught” us outside the classroom. They appreciate hearing our expressions of gratitude, even if quite a bit of time has elapsed. This is a note she wrote to a teacher decades after a meaningful incident. Follow Paula.

Chery Gegelman of Simply Understanding shares five reasons thankfulness is more than child’s playFollow Chery.

APPROACHES FOR BEING MORE GRATEFUL

“This a wonderful day. I’ve never seen this one before.” Maya Angelou

According to Sean Glaze of Great Results Teambuilding, a constant focus on what is missing, what needs to get better, where the flaws are, can turn aspirations into frustrations. As a coach,  manager, principal, or leader in any arena, rather than seeing the hole, we should step back more often to appreciate the doughnut. We should find things to be grateful for. In just five minutes over seven days, you can completely change your focus and impact. Follow Sean.

According to Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership, Gratitude is good for you, but an “attitude of gratitude is not enough. You get maximum benefits if you spread it around.  Follow Wally.

In the post, Making Thanksgiving a Leadership Skill, Robyn McLeod of Thoughtful Leaders Blog shares that we can reap greater benefits by making “giving thanks” a year-round leadership practice.  Follow Robyn.

Paul LaRue of The UPwards Leader shares that we can appreciate leadership in many forms, but true leadership of positive influence on others is what it’s really all about. Follow Paul

“Feeling gratitude and not expressing it is like wrapping a present and not giving it.” William Arthur Ward

David Grossman of The Grossman Group shares his Thanksgiving tradition: Grandma Elsie’s Chiffon Pie– and celebrates her generous spirit every holiday season. Follow David.

Chip Bell of Chip Bell Group is grateful for PASSION!! Without it, life would become plain vanilla, greatness would become mediocrity, and commitment would become complacency. In the words of English novelist E.M. Forster, “One person with passion is better than forty people merely interested.” Follow Chip.

According to Michelle Cubas, CPCC, ACC, of Positive Potentials, LLC,  gratitude is a state of mind when you allow it to be. Gratitude is not a natural state. Consider two toddlers in the same room with a fistful of goodies. Often, they will want what the other one has too! This description derives from a selfish desire for survival that is hard-wired into us. We must make a choice for a different state of mind.  Follow Michelle.

The deepest craving of human nature is the need to be appreciated.” William James

Ken Downer of Rapid Start Leadership shares: An attitude of gratitude can provide lots of benefits, like increased happiness, improved health, and even a better night’s sleep. Here are eight things you can do today to make life better, both for you, and those around you, by focusing on what you have, instead of what you don’t. Follow Ken

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited suggests that a good mindset about giving/receiving revolves around forgetting what you give and remembering what you receive.  Follow Beth.

WHAT TO DO WHEN IT’S HARD

Jesse Stoner of Seapoint Center for Collaborative Leadership reminds us that the holiday season can be difficult for many people, but it’s still possible to feel joy and gratitude in stressful times… which is good for your physical and mental health. She gives us three steps to access gratitude when you’re feeling stressed. Follow Jesse.

Eileen McDargh of The Energizer asks, “Do you ever have a moment when the world feels upside down and you are stressed or sick?” Eileen shares how the little things in life can give us pleasure even when we’re under the weather!  Follow Eileen.

Chris Edmonds of Driving Results through Culture reminds us that while civility and respect is not demonstrated daily in many of our homes, neighborhoods, or workplaces, now is the time to begin being thankful and kind in every interaction. The choice is ours.  Follow Chris.

How about you? What are you most thankful for? How do you keep a grateful approach?

Frontline Festival: Leaders Share About Employee Engagement and Customer Service

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival is about employee engagement in relation to customer service. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors! Next month’s Frontline Festival is about gratitude.  Submit your relevant blog posts here!

Creating Great Customer Experiences

Nate Regier of Next Element Consulting shares that openness is critical to excellent customer service because customers want to know you care before they can engage in problem-solving. When employees engage emotionally with customers, they recognize that emotional problems are at the route of customer service complaints. I love his 3 part model for connecting with empathy. Follow Nate

According to Chip Bell of Chip Bell Group Attitude is the foundation of innovative service and that takes leaders who stay on the hunt for spirit leeches and “burn” them out with the heat of their passionate commitment to the customer! Real leeches suck blood; spirit leeches suck spirit. Remember: customers abhor indifferent service more than bad service! Bad service could be the result of a faulty system, a process with a glitch, or a leadership vacuum. But, indifferent service always signals a complete lack of caring!  He also provides a post to encourage remarkable serviceFollow Chip.

According to Chris Edmonds of Driving Results through Culture, great customer service is delivered only by trusted, talented, engaged employees. In this short post and three-minute video, Chris’ insights from a remarkable family vacation leads to three keys to building incredible customer loyalty.  Follow Chris.

Paula Kiger of Big Green Pen shares a personal story related to Disney’s commitment to customer service. When she had a family member helping to make the magic, her appreciation changed and grew deeper.  Follow Paula.

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates shares some customer service lessons from helicopter pilotsFollow Shelley

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited reminds us that sometimes, attention to just being responsive is a key way for your employees to serve customers and clients well. Follow Beth.

Building Service into the Fabric of Your Culture

John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement advises that it is very difficult to create a system with customer focus by all staff without several basic supports in place. Respect for people needs to be practiced, not just mentioned. Staff have to be given authority to act in the interest of customers.  Follow John.

Jesse Stoner of Seapoint Center for Collaborative Leadership reminds us that customers can always tell whether a company is values-driven. You don’t need an expert to tell you. She provides five ways to look to your own customer service experience to tell what’s really going on. Follow Jesse.

David Grossman of The Grossman Group  advises leaders to communicate their company brand on the inside to engage employees, which in turn creates happy customers and a more successful business. Follow David.

Employee Engagement and Customer Service

Amanda Cameron of Patriot Software, LLC  shares that how your employees feel about your company has a huge impact on customer service. Business leaders who promote employee engagement should see both work culture and customer satisfaction improve.  Follow Amanda.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership provides a post showing that when engagement grows, so does retention, productivity, and customer service.  Follow Wally.

According to Chery Gegelman of Simply Understanding uncommon employee engagement and superior customer service doesn’t just happen. It begins with us, learning to create environments that support and direct the behavior of our co-workers, and yes, even our bosses.  Follow Chery.

How about you? How do you work to enhance the customer experience where you work?

resiliancy

Frontline Festival: Leaders Share about Overcoming Setbacks, Resiliency, and Lessons Learned (with video)

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival is about overcoming setbacks, resiliancy, and lessons learned. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors! Next month’s Frontline Festival is all about employee engagement in relation to customer service.  Submit your relevant blog posts here!

Resiliency and Overcoming Setbacks

According to Chip Bell of Chip Bell Group, customers love service providers with a “never say die” attitude. When that resilience is part of their manner, customers feel they have an advocates working on their behalf. He shares a guest post he wrote for Eileen McDargh with more on the topic of “Service Resiliance.”  Follow Chip

Susan Mazza of Random Acts of Leadership  reminds us that if we want to set ourselves up to be resilient enough to pursue dreams through to realization, it is critical that we get clear about more than just goals–but also why those goals truly matter.  Follow Susan.

great books on resilienceOn the best books I’ve read on resiliency is Option B by Sheryl Sanburg and Adam Grant. What concept I found particularly useful was the 3 traps that sabotage resliency: Permanance, pervasiveness, and personalization. You can read more about the 3 Ps In Eileen McDargh’s post as well.

Given the horrific parade of disasters in recent times, this post from Eileen McDargh of The Energizer looks at what survivors can do AND what those who wish to help others can do. Follow Eileen.

In this 20 minute podcast interview, Jesse Stoner of Seapoint Center for Collaborative Leadership interviews Eileen McDargh, who explains how resiliency is a life skill that supports you not only during challenges and times of adversity, but also during times of opportunity and growth. Resiliency is not about bouncing back, it’s about bouncing forward.   Follow Jesse.

Julie Winkle Giulioni of DesignArounds advises that the ability to learn, develop and grow is today’s only sustainable competitive advantage. As a result, effective leaders appreciate the need for learning agility.  Follow Julie

Sean Glaze of Great Results Teambuilding advises that we apply and repeat three amazingly simple ways to help our team, so they will be far more likely to thrive through change and overcome common pitfalls often encountered on the path to progress. He also provides a second post about invisible fences that limit your team.  Follow Sean.

John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement thinks the key is to actively seek to learn and create robust systems.  The best way to be resilient and overcome setbacks is to actively seek knowledge and improve.  Don’t try to explain why failures were unavoidable or blame others (which are both common) or ignore them.  Instead seek out the reasons why the causes of the result (systems in the organization, your thought process, the actions you took…) led to the problem and seek to change so the future will have better results.   Follow John.

Lisa Kohn from Thoughtful Leaders Blog presents leadership lessons of yellow birds, where she shares that there are always simple ways available to us to find meaning and motivation to be the best leader — and person — we can be. We just have to be open and look for them.  Follow Lisa.

Paula Kiger of Big Green Pen shares an anecdote about how she and her daughter tackled replacing a doorknob together,  rather than hiring a locksmith. It gave them renewed confidence, mother-daughter bonding, and lessons that applied to more than home repair. Follow Paula.

Alli Polin of Break the Frame advises that we can never predict when life will feel like it’s crashing down. She offers encouragement to open the window to what’s next with these three lessons on resilience and change.  Follow Alli.building resiliency

Jon Mertz of Thin Difference gives a charge: Leaders, take note. There is enough chaos in the world. We do not need to create more. Good leaders know how to find the center in chaos and focus on what matters most. That’s how we can make positive change. Follow Jon.

Lessons and Learning

On her recent trip to Scotland, Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates applied some important concepts to scaling difficult tasksFollow Shelley

Mike Kappel of Patriot Software shares his hard-learned lessons on working with a team and how small business leaders can improve their team building skills.  Follow Mike

Thomas Mangum of ThomasMangum.com shares about how power doesn’t make you a leader, caring does.  Follow Thomas.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited offers some ponderings about the time when the mistake–was hers.  Follow Beth.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership shares what he learned–and didn’t learn–from his worst boss ever.  Follow Wally.

David Grossman of The Grossman Group shares a leadership lesson he learned about inspiration and aspiration from Disney’s Moana.

 

 

 

Frontline Festival: Leaders Share About Team Building (with video)

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival is about team building. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors! Next month’s Frontline Festival is all lessons learned, overcoming setbacks and resiliency.  Submit your relevant blog posts here!

Leaders need to adjust to the skill and abilities of the people, and don’t expect new people to fit into the team exactly as those doing the job previously. John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement reminds us to take care to design the system to minimize risk of failure and maximize the advantages each employee brings to work every day in Take Advantage of the Strengths Each Person Brings to Work. Follow John.


Sean Glaze of Great Results Teambuilding tells us a good leader will recognize the importance of encouragement as a key part of team building.  In 12 Exalting Phrases Leaders Should Share with their Team, he helps you to take advantage of every opportunity to be an encouraging and inspiring flame that your people want to be near and benefit from.  He also shares ways to strengthen your team even if you aren’t ready to schedule a team building event.  Follow Sean.

David Grossman of The Grossman Group  explains that research shows the best and most effective teams aren’t those that combined the best and brightest people, but rather, something you might not expect.  Follow David.

In Are You a Team Player? Nikki Heise of Ridgeline Coaching explores the definition of team and asks how we look at our teams at work.

Most of us do most of our work in teams. Here are four important things you should know that make a core work team effective, from Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership  Follow Wally.

Looking for teamwork quotes? Here are some unique ones from Inc.

Jesse Stoner of Seapoint Center for Collaborative Leadership shares how understanding the characteristics of effective teams gives you a target to shoot for and better prepares you to support your team’s development. They conducted an extensive research study which revealed six Benchmarks of Team Excellence.  Follow Jesse.

In the post,The Biggest Barrier to Your Team’s Development? You,  Robyn McLeod of Thoughtful Leaders Blog shares how to avoid getting in the way of your team’s success and the steps you can take to help them flourish.   Follow Robyn.

Learn about three critical factors leaders need to employ to help keep their employees on course to achieving the long-term goals of their organization via Tanveer Naseer of Tanveer Naseer Leadership  Follow Tanveer.

Chris Edmonds of Driving Results through Culture asks “How can your team boost it’s performance?” then looks at Formula 1 racing for insights. This pit crew changed all four tires during a mid-race pit stop in less than three seconds! Everyone knowing their responsibilities doesn’t boost team results – everyone working in harmony while doing what they must do is the way to nirvana. Follow Chris.

Are your teams coming up with the same old tired solutions to new problems? Learn how to inspire them through the use of creativity via Eileen McDargh of The Energizer   Follow Eileen.

A strong team can take any crazy vision and turn it into reality. – John Carmack

Team building is an important part of managing a small business workforce. Foster collaboration between your employees with these simple team building activities from Amanda Cameron of Patriot Software, LLC    Follow Amanda.

In order for a team to function properly and effectively, they must find common ground. Eric Torrence of Thin Difference shares five ways we are all alike. By focusing on what unites us, even tasks that seem insurmountable are possible.  Follow Eric. 

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates observed strong teamwork in an unfortunate, emergency situationFollow Shelley

American Business models began to move away from “command-control” in the 1990s. Since then, team building has been covered from top to toe over the last decades because it was a novel approach to performance.  Michelle Cubas, CPCC, ACC, of Positive Potentials, LLC  asks, why does it still seem foreign to many managers?   Follow Michelle.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited gives us some questions to ask when our team doesn’t seem to be performing wellFollow Beth.

brand awareness

Frontline Festival: Leaders Share about Building Brand Awareness

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival is about building brand awareness. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors! Next month’s Frontline Festival is all about team building. What’s your favorite team building experience? What are your best practices for building teams?  Submit your relevant blog posts here!

Our Reflections on the Festival Contributions and Insights on Building an Army of Brand Ambassadors

John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement  talks about how building brand recognition with your team starts with inspiring passion in your message and teaching employees about what your business stands for.  Aligning Marketing Vision and Management  

David Grossman of The Grossman Group explains that when done well, internal branding is a powerful and proven strategy to drive engagement and the behaviors leaders want inside organizations, especially as it relates to a company’s ability to deliver on its brand promise. Top 10 Tips for Successful Internal Branding Efforts  Follow David.

Brand is just a perception, and perception will match reality over time. Sometimes it will be ahead, other times it will be behind. But brand is simply a collective impression some have about a product. – Elon Musk

Michelle Cubas, CPCC, ACC, of Positive Potentials, LLC discusses team buy-in on brand awareness which takes many forms. Find ways to support your efforts.  Ways to Build Team Brand Awareness   Follow Michelle.

Amanda Cameron of Patriot Software, LLC   says that building brand recognition with your team starts with inspiring passion in your message and teaching employees about what your business stands for. Building Brand Recognition With Your Team   Follow Amanda.

Shelley Row of ShelleyRow.com warns us that the tone of our emails can negatively affect our brand. Flaming Emails: Don’t Be THAT Person.    Follow Shelley.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited  looks at why something as simple as our email signature can help our brand.  Five Ways to Make Your Email Signatures Work!   Follow Beth.

The keys to brand success are self-definition, transparency, authenticity and accountability. – Simon Mainwaring

A Few of My Thoughts on Brand Awareness

So many companies have strict social media policies for employees. I’m always struck by the impact social media can have in progressive companies who embrace these powerful tools and encourage their employees to blog and tweet about the brand. Encouraging employees to have a voice and not just be a “bot.”

I love this Inc. article, How to Find the Right Employees to Be Your Brand Ambassadors, where Eric Markowitz shares how to recruit and encourage employees to promote your brand on social media.

My most popular piece on the topic was published in Brand Quarterly   7 Ways to Turn Your Employees into Brand Ambassadors.

In this Fast Company article, 10 Excuses That Silently Damage Managers Careers, David Dye and I tackle some of the language that can easily derail your personal brand.

In The Amazing Side Effect of Making-it-Right Customer Service, we explore the benefits of customer service that builds brands and creates a best-in-class customer experience.

I’m often asked to speak on how to turn your employees into brand ambassadors. I really enjoyed my work with senior HR leaders at the HR Asia Summit C-Suite Symposium forum this spring on the topic, where we discussed the importance of building empathetic connections between employees and your companies purpose– and connecting what you’re asking employees to do, with why you’re asking them to do it at every level of the business.

 

Frontline Festival: Leaders Give Pointers on Handling Conflict

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival is about handling conflict in your team. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors! Next month’s Frontline Festival is all about building brand awareness. What approaches are you and your team using to build your organization’s brand? Submit your relevant blog posts here!

Robyn McLeod of Thoughtful Leaders Blog  presents how to handle in-fighting on your team by sharing four tips that help leaders break through communication barriers and eliminate in-fighting within their teams.  How to Handle In-fighting on Your Team  Follow Robyn.

Jesse Stoner of Seapoint Center for Collaborative Leadership says that a list of values that are simply a list of single words that are not clearly defined can lead to confusion and team conflict, as this true story demonstrates. 5 Tips to Ensure Your Values Unify Your Team, Not Divide    Follow Jesse.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership   says if you’re the boss, you have to confront team members about poor performance. When you do it promptly and well, everyone is better off.  Confrontation and Splinters   Follow Wally.

For good ideas and true innovation, you need human interaction, conflict, argument, debate.  Margaret Heffernan

David Grossman of The Grossman Group  explains that conflict is a paradox that every leader faces:  Create teams that work well together but embrace conflict. Embracing Conflict: It’s Part of Every Leader’s Job  Follow David.

Chris Edmonds of Driving Results through Culture  says when team members are of “one mind, one heart, and one voice,” there are fewer conflicts, better decision making, and more aligned performance.  Does Your Team Have “One Mind, One Heart, One Voice”?   Follow Chris.

From Chery Gegelman of Simply Understanding: In all conflicts – the only person you will ever control is you…but learning to hold others accountable with compassion will grow your influence and your results.  Got Sugar?  Learning to Speak Truth with Grace   Follow Chery.

Amanda Cameron of Patriot Software, LLC knows that being the boss isn’t easy. Business leaders need to know how to handle conflict in the workplace to keep operations running smoothly. How to Handle Conflict at Work for Small Business   Follow Amanda.

Conflict is drama, and how people deal with conflict shows you the kind of people they are. Stephen Moyer

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates explores how to handle conflict well by pointing out that your team needs to have healthy conversations. She provides some tips for turning competitive talks into collaborative discussions. For Better Decisions: Convert Competitive Talking into Collaborative Talking  Follow Shelley

Nathan Regier of Next Element Consulting – Next From Nate  shares his viewpoint that when we mediate, manage, or reduce the conflict, we necessarily reduce the energy available for productive problem-solving. When we respect the tension and use that energy to create instead of destroy, the results can be transformative.  My Manifesto For Change: Conflict Isn’t The Problem  Follow Nathan.

Jon Mertz of Thin Difference  shares his perspective about how business can be a power for good amid the the conflict that pervades our nation’s political discourse. It’s time for CEOs to become activists for positive change and help handle the conflict infecting our American team.   The Leadership Power Shift Underway (A Political and Business Undercurrent)  Follow Jon.

Difficulties are meant to rouse, not discourage. The human spirit is to grow strong by conflict.  William Ellery Channing

From Paula Kiger of Weaving Influence: In this post, Paula shares the story of a father who sends his children to learn teamwork via a “challenge course.” The situation deteriorates when there is conflict over who will lead and who will follow.  Gambling on Leadership  Follow Paula.

Chip Bell of Chip Bell.com  challenges us to get a child to hear your positions and make recommendations.  There is nothing more sobering than hearing an eight-year old comment on your positions and practices.  Their innate humility and innocence can be a boon to seeing through the minutia and sometimes silly things that trigger conflicts.    Follow Chip.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited  knows that to handle conflict well, you sometimes owe someone an apology. She shares about a well-done apology she was given. How to Give an Effective Apology   Follow Beth.

 

 

Frontline Festival: Leaders Share about Confidence, Humility, Results, & Relationships

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival is a celebratory finish line of the Winning Well International Symposium with themes of confidence, humility, results, and relationships. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors! Next month’s Frontline Festival is all about handling conflict in your team. Submit your relevant blog posts by June 9 here!

 

CONFIDENCE

If you have no confidence in self, you are twice defeated in the race of life.  Marcus Garvey

John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement discusses why the lack of confidence is more problematic than having confidence. Building a Great Software Development Team    Follow John.

Robyn McLeod of Thoughtful Leaders Blog shares that building our self-respect strengthens confidence and allows us to be more open to feedback. Why Self-respect is a Key Leadership Skill  Follow Robyn.

HUMILITY

Do you wish to rise? Begin by descending. You plan a tower that will pierce the clouds? Lay first the foundation of humility.  Augustine

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership explores the virtue of humility as a leader. Don’t Worry About Being Humble, Just Do It  Follow Wally.

Skip Prichard of Leadership Insights leads us in discovering a unique leadership lesson in humility from Pope Francis. You’ll find 12 leadership lessons from the Vatican. Lead With Humility: 12 Lessons from Pope Francis.    Follow Skip.

RESULTS

The achievements of an organization are the results of the combined effort of each individual. Vince Lombardi

David Grossman of The Grossman Group tells his story of self-discovery and stresses the value of leaders living authentically so you can be your best self, motivate your teams, and get results by showing leaders how to bring your best to work and bring out the best in others.  Respectful Authenticity    Follow David.

Artika Tyner of Planting People Growing Justice Leadership Institute shares 5 key lessons on how to achieve results in your business and professional development. 5 Lessons on Business Success from the American Small Business Champion TrainingFollow Artika.

Note: We’d like to congratulate Dr. Tyner and the Planting People Growing Justice organization on the national recognition as an American Small Business Champion!

Sean Glaze of Great Results Teambuilding  talks about the problem with getting results and buy-in on many teams is that mission statements stay on the walls. It never makes it into the hearts and minds of the people working together to establish a relationship between what they DO and what they are helping to accomplish.  How Many Mission Statements Does Your Team Have?  Follow Sean.

Hiro Taylor of HeroPay Starting knows starting a small business can be hard. When the times get tough remember these words of wisdom, from some of the most successful people of the last century. Keep your eyes on the prize – in business and in life. 10 Motivational Quotes Every Small Business Owner Should Read Follow Hiro.

RELATIONSHIPS

Trust is the glue of life. It’s the foundational principle that holds all relationships. Stephen Covey

Mike Kappel of Patriot Software, LLC  When it comes to leading a team to success, relationships are key. For top results, leaders need to know how to connect with the workforces they manage. How to Be a Team Player in a Leadership Role   Follow Mike.

Susan Mazza of Random Acts of Leadership.  offers her thoughts on why connection fuel progress, and is the source for progress that is both meaningful and satisfying. We sacrifice that progress when we don’t consciously take the time to just talk to each other — human to human — and take the time to connect meaningfully. 3 Reasons Why Connecting is Essential to Progress    Follow Susan.

Tanveer Naseer of Tanveer Naseer Leadership talks about how a leader’s ability to build relationships with their employees is fast becoming a critical key to their success. Learn about 3 strategies to help with this.  3 Keys For Building Relationships With Those You Lead  Follow Tanveer.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited reminds us that there is an “I” in teamwork and helps us assess whether we are a good team player.  There is an “I” in Team  Follow Beth.

Jesse Stoner of Seapoint Center for Collaborative Leadership  shares a personal experience of bridging the divide.  This is the story of how my brother and I came to terms with our differences and what I learned about how to bridge the divide.  Dialogue Bridges the Divide    Follow Jesse.

 

 

 

 

Development

Frontline Festival: Leaders Share about Growth and Change

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival is all about growth and change. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors! Next month’s Frontline Festival corresponds to the Winning Well International Symposium. We will run the Frontline Festival as our closing post for the symposium, the week of May 22.  Please share your best blog post that correlates with one of the four Winning Well principles: Confidence, Humility, Results, or Relationships.  Submit your item here by May 15.

Susan Mazza of Random Acts of Leadership shares that understanding your typical personal style of leadership can help you grow as a leader, by guiding your approach to the three fundamental acts of leadership  Speaking Up, Stepping Up, and Standing Up Follow Susan.

Lisa Kohn from Thoughtful Leaders Blog practices Positive Psychology, and is working to be more consistent in its application of the tools and mindsets, and also more equipped to guide clients through it. Get Serious About Your Growth  Follow Lisa.

John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement gives us ways to focus on growing and changing. Our culture seems to encourage the superficial and new even when, as it so often does, it mainly amounts to fooling oneself.  The Road Not Taken    Follow John.

The quality of a leader is reflected in the standards they set for themselves.  Ray Kroc

Rachel Blakely of Patriot Software, LLC  advises that as a small business owner, your company will experience huge benefits when you develop leadership skills. Eight Tips for Growing as Leader in Business.  Follow Rachel.

David Grossman of The Grossman Group is focused on leading with respectful authenticity. The Secret Respectfully Authentic Leaders Know. Follow David.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership says leading change in an organization is a lot like pouring coffee in a restaurant. You can learn a lot from a professional waiter. Change and the Gentle Pour.   Follow Wally.

Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other.  John F. Kennedy

Skip Prichard of Leadership Insights is focused on growth to increase my creative side. Many of us don’t think of ourselves as creative – not only are there many types of creativity – but all of us can use hacks to increase our creativity. 23 Hacks to Boost Your Creativity.  Follow Skip.

Chip Bell of ChipBell.com comments: After watching Will Smith in the new movie Collateral Beauty I want to pay more attention to and value the details of my experiences and be more in the moment.  I am an overachiever (a trait I like) and try to maximize productivity (a trait I also like).  But I too often miss the beauty of the cardinal outside my office window or the amaryllis starting to bloom or the pain on the face of the guy who picks up my garbage each week.  I need to remember to ask him a question about his life and thank him for his work.  Follow Chip.

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited provides a list of 10 Apps, Tools and Resources for Your Professional Development and Inspiration. Follow Beth.

Hold yourself responsible to a higher standard than anybody expects of you. Never excuse yourself.  Henry Ward Beecher

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates suggests walking a labyrinth to learn leadership discipline. Follow Shelley

According to Sean Glaze of Great Results Teambuilding leaders have a tremendous impact on their organization because the phrases they share with their teams can either produce distrust and apathy or ignite passion and commitment. Follow Sean.

Visme.com contributed the following leadership infographic by Gordon Tredgold of GordonTredgold.com which provides a compilation of 20 Habits of unsuccessful leaders.  Follow Visme.  Follow Gordon. 12 Exalting Phrases Good Leaders Share with their Team.  Follow Sean.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frontline Festival: Leaders Share Team Building Ideas

Welcome back to the Let’s Grow Leaders Frontline Festival. This month’s festival is all about team time. Thanks to Joy and Tom Guthrie of Vizwerx Group for the great pic and to all our contributors! Next month’s Frontline Festival follows up on this month’s with a theme all about growth and change. The question for the month is:  What is an area of growth you are focusing on, either professionally or personally? Submit your growth and change related blog posts and answers to that question here!

This month’s question was: What tips do you have for working well with a team?

A sense of teamwork is crucial for a productive small business staff. Try steps for leaders to take for building teamwork in the workplace from Amanda Cameron of Patriot Software, LLC Follow Amanda.

If you find yourself on a dysfunctional team, or just want to get a new team off to a great start, ask yourself the following three questions from Susan Mazza of Random Acts of Leadership. You may discover that your team is nothing more than a committee in disguise. If so, now you’ll know exactly how to correct course.Follow Susan.

Skip Prichard of Leadership Insights gives us 10 strategies to help make a team work well together. They are derived by Dennis Perkins who studied the incredible survivor story of the Midnight Rambler and the storm that almost destroyed everything. Follow Skip.

Part of developing a team that works well together is developing the individual skills of people. A bigger part of it is developing an understanding of the system within which those people must operate and adjusting that system to the people on the team.  Too much time is devoted to changing people to fit into the constraints of the existing system and too little to changing the existing system to take advantage of individuals on the team now. Thanks, John Hunter of Curious Cat Management Improvement Follow John.

Building product is not about having a large team to manage. It is about having a small team with the right people on it. ~ Fred Wilson

Jesse Stoner of Seapoint Center for Collaborative Leadership asks, “How many teams have you been on that came to an official end?” If you’re like most people, it’s not too many. That’s because teams seem to take on a life of their own, even after their initial purpose has been fulfilled or no longer makes sense. Here’s how to tell when it’s time to close down a teamFollow Jesse.

Tanveer Naseer of Tanveer Naseer Leadership   helps us learn about three tactics successful leaders use to build thriving teams that can adapt to the changing needs of their organization.  Follow Tanveer.

Robyn McLeod of Thoughtful Leaders Blog notes that at times, the way a team is set up and work gets done, can cause a team to be more at odds than pulling together. But with four simple tips – as simple as reducing conflicting goals – you can help your team work as one rather than against each other.   Follow Robyn.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership reminds us that most of us do most of our work in teams. Here are four important things you should know that make a core work team effective. Follow Wally.

Great things in business are never done by one person. They’re done by a team of people. ~ Steve Jobs

Chris Edmonds of Driving Results through Culture shares an important exercise you can do with your team to help them write their unique story in “Nurture Your Team’s Narrative.” Follow Chris.

Julie Winkle Giulioni of DesignArounds shares the 10 Top Trust Terminators that will break down teamwork. Follow Julie

Chery Gegelman of Simply Understanding tells the story of an under-performing team that was feeling victimized but changed their focus, learned how to play together, built trust, began exceeding their goals and instigated organizational development projects throughout the company.  (When we create workplaces that encourage people to use their imaginations and to laugh, we will increase energy, teamwork and results!) Follow Chery.

Alli Polin of Break the Frame  shares that the best leaders know that teamwork is a dance between individual strength and team capacity. Skills matter, but team members must have each other’s back, consistently give their personal best and learn how to play well with others too. Follow Alli.

Shelley Row of Shelley Row Associates shares some ways to increase participation in your team. Follow Shelley

Beth Beutler of H.O.P.E. Unlimited acknowledges that sometimes, team building starts by looking at ourselvesFollow Beth.

The main ingredient of stardom is the rest of the team. ~ John Wooden