Why NPS (Net Promoter Score) is Never Enough

The call center had ventured into this unknown territory organically. Their leadership knew their processes needed rigor, so they called me in to take a look and help them create a scalable model.

My basic question, “How do you measure performance?” was met with an embarrassed silence followed by the awkward answer, “Attendance and adherence to schedule.”

Now you don’t need to be a customer service genius to know that measuring whether reps show up to work is not enough to guarantee a best-in-class customer experience. Most centers at least use NPS (Net Promoter Score), which measures whether the customer would recommend the company to a friend. But this project was different, and that wasn’t so easy.

My expectations lowered, I asked, “Would it be okay for me to sit with some reps?” And that’s when the real surprise began.

I watched as each rep passionately explained their processes.

“Oh my gosh, I love my job, I just can’t wait to help customers. You see this guy here? He thinks everything is fixed, but I dug a bit deeper and I know we can help him more. It takes a few extra clicks to get what I need, but it’s worth it.”

“Well, each morning before I get to work, I go onto our–and our competitor’s–Facebook page to see if anything hot might have surfaced since my last shift. Stuff changes fast, and it’s important to come into work fully prepared.”

“The best part of our work is that no one gives us a script, we are each able to use our own unique style as long as we follow the basic guidelines. Customers love that. We also share what works best with one another.”

I reviewed customer conversation after conversation. I surely would recommend these reps to a friend. They were scoring “10s” on an invisible scoreboard.

My mind raced to the week before when I had met with the builder for our new home.

“Okay, here’s a survey you need to fill out.  I only get my bonus if you give me a 10. It’s really important that you answer 10 to these three questions. I don’t care what you put for the rest of the survey, you can be as honest as you want on those. In fact, that’s how we know what to improve. But whatever you do, please give me a 10. In fact, let me just circle that in for you.”

If he worked for me, I would have fired him.

But, here’s where it gets trickier. This guy’s going to be our project manager for the next year. He’ll have discretion about whether he fixes our borderline problems on our new home. The wackiest part is until that conversation it had been a 10 experience.

My gut says, report this stupidity his boss, but then what? And of course, I have no way of knowing if his boss isn’t playing the same game. I wonder how many other new home owners leave their final walk-through feeling similarly gamed?

Don’t get me wrong, I’m all for NPS and other CSAT (customer satisfaction) measures. I will help that call center build a meaningful balanced scorecard, and recommend they include NPS, but not without telling this cautionary tale.

The spirit of NPS is easily destroyed when mathematical gymnastics trump a sincere desire to improve.

If you’re using NPS, be sure you dig deeper. Follow-up with your promoters. “Why would you recommend us?” Give them a chance to say, “Because I didn’t want your rep to get fired.”

Want to give your customer service a competitive edge? I’d love to help you dig deeper. Please give me a call at 443/750-1249 for a free consultation. 

Road trip

The Power of a Road Trip

I spent many years in a “trust but verify” culture. What this meant was that I, and every executive above me, was expected to constantly show up in the retail stores to experience what was happening as the customers would.

Is there a bird’s nest over the front entrance risking bird poop falling on a customer’s head? Are customers being serviced in a timely way? Does the store look inviting with all light bulbs on and phones charged? Are the employees up to speed on the latest products and services? Can the store managers articulate their key initiatives and what they could do to improve?

There’s no question that knowing an exec could stop in at any time, kept everyone on their toes. The stores undoubtedly were cleaner and the customer service better as a result.

Of course these visits were always stressful. The general sentiment was that there was “No such thing as a good visit, only not a bad one.”

Which is what made the technique I learned from my predecessor so brilliant.

Every summer, instead of the usual pop-in store visits, Chris and his right hand guy, Jimmy, would pack up a van, wrap it in some marketing bling, and hit the road for a month visiting over a hundred stores across a nine-hour radius.

The schedule was pre-announced and there was one big rule: only positive feedback, celebration and fun.

If something was wrong, he or Jimmy would just quietly fix it, and make a note to circle back at some later point to see if there was a chronic problem.

This tour was all about noticing what was right.

He would do his homework and came prepared with all kinds of recognition, along with a token of appreciation for every employee.

The store managers came up with all kinds of creative ways to add to the fun.  Jimmy took tons of pictures of every visit. Every evening, they would Photoshop them into creative collage, including names of those recognized and why, along with descriptions of best practices. This “postcard” was emailed to the entire region every evening.

The other store directors jokingly referred to the month as “Chris’ love tour,” but Chris didn’t care, he knew what worked.

The truth is, the employees loved the love.

Of course, results skyrocketed during that time. Everyone wanted to be on top of their game when the tour stopped by their store.

And as you can imagine, there was not a bird’s nest in sight. The phones all had charge, and the employees knew all about the latest products and services.

Trust your employees to rise to the occasion, and they will.

Sounds easy, right? But I know a lot of managers who fumble their managing by walking around (MBWA).

There’s real power in getting out with your people with a single intention– to uplift, recognize and celebrate.

37 Questions to Ask Yourself When Your Team Lacks Energy

I was giving a keynote on Saturday to large group of administrative professionals. My speech followed the recognition lunch. In addition to their formal awards, they did one of my favorites, “Stand up if _____.” “Stand up if you’ve received your certification (nearly everyone in the room stood).” “Stand up, if you’ve achieved another important professional milestone (again, the room looked like a standing ovation).” “Stand up if you made a significant contribution as a volunteer this year (nearly all again.)” “Stand up if you’ve received any kind of recognition this year at your job (about 2% of the room stood).” I’m sure the intention wasn’t to prove that point, but it raised an important issue. These hard-working admins in vital roles, felt their contributions were not being recognized as they should.

Earlier that week I was working with a group of frontline leaders who supervise construction workers. I asked “What can you tell me about your team members? Are they married? Do they have kids? What do they like to do for fun?” One of the guys admitted. “Well, I only find out about that stuff when it becomes a problem. Like if they have to call take their kid to the doctors and miss work. Now that I think about it, it’s always in a negative context.”

If you’re full of energy, but your team looks like they need a good shot of an energy drink to get going, ask yourself these questions.

37 Questions to Ask Yourself if Your Team Lacks Energy

Do I SEE them for who they are?

  • What do I know about my team members as people (e.g. What do they do for fun? What is their significant other’s name?) This free tool can help. connections worksheet
  • Do I know about their additional talents and skills (those not necessarily used in their core job) that we could tap into for special projects or events?
  • Do I help them leverage and develop their strengths?

Do I TRUST them?

  • Do I rely on them to make decisions in their areas of expertise?
  • Am I able to be vulnerable with them?

Am I SUPPORTING them?

  • How do I advocate for them and their careers?
  • Who needs more support?
  • Have I ensured they have adequate tools and resources to be effective?

Am I CONNECTING with them?

  • Does my team truly understand what we’re trying to accomplish and why?
  • Do we have times that we talk about things other than work?
  • Do we enjoy being around one another?

Am I HEARING what they are telling me?

  • How could I make it easier for them to give me feedback?
  • When someone gives me bad news, how do I respond?
  • Do I ask for their opinions?

Am INCLUDING them?

  • Do I involve them in decisions?
  • Am I willing to share sensitive information?
  • Do I give them opportunities to present to my boss?

Are we SUCCEEDING?

  • Do we take time to understand our successes as well as our failures?
  • How do I help my team become more resilient to setbacks?
  • What could we start doing today that would have the biggest impact on our results?

Am I RECOGNIZING their contributions?

  • Do I provide a good mix of positive and constructive feedback?
  • Do I say “thank you” enough?
  • Do I know how each of my team members likes to be recognized?

Are we HAVING FUN?

  • Do we find time to enjoy our work and one another?
  • Do I create an environment that fosters creativity and fun?

Am I REAL with them?

  • Do I share my thoughts and feelings with candor?
  • Do I explain the reasons behind controversial decisions?

In other news.

energize your leadership16 Authors from around the world met through social media and discovered a shared passion–leadership. We all have varying backgrounds ranging from senior leaders within organizations to consultants, coaches, bloggers, and authors. Today we announce the launch of our collaborative book, Energize Your Leadership. See the video trailer here, or visit our site.

The Surprising Way to Encourage Disengagement

Within three years, Mike had gone from an excited, creative new hire full of passion, energy and ideas, to a guy with one foot out the door with disengagement like carbon monoxide: invisible and impossible to smell. Here is his story.

My first year, my ideas and alternative views were “refreshing.” I was quickly viewed as a rising star and invited to the right meetings. I was pleased to be rewarded with the coveted “exceeds expectations” rating. I was constantly looking for ways to improve our processes and make the company better. The next year, I guess I got a little too comfortable with sharing my opinions. In hindsight, I could have positioned them better, but I was saying what needed to be said. And every time I left a meeting the level above (except my boss) would thank me for speaking the truth. I just cared so much about our cause and was attached to our vision.

I received a “developing rating” that year.  That’s when I knew I was going to have to leave, but I wanted it to be on my own terms. I decided the only way to survive was to just stop caring. And that’s what I did. I buried my passion and I went along, even if I knew a better approach. And that year, I was once again given the rating of “exceeds expectations.” I “exceeded expectations” by caring less, offering less, and doing less.”

Mike’s boss made a point to chime in on the appraisal with a comment: “It’s nice to have you back.”

Mike is convinced his secret was subtle, but I doubt it. I imagine other box 9 candidates with great ideas vicariously got the “settle down” message and stiffled their enthusiasm as they polished their resumes.

It’s easy to think of engagement as everyone singing along with a merry smile.

Dig deeper. Your most engaged players may be the naysayers. They may need some polish, but be careful not to rub off their passion and value in the process.

5 Signs the Shared Vision is Clear

When my mom entered the hospice facility this week, the unspoken vision was perfectly clear: Reduce Mom’s suffering as much as possible; keep Dad from keeling over with exhaustion; fill the air with constant love; and eek out any joy we can.

The Power of a Shared Vision

I know you’ve had your unfair share of sad times too. No family can escape them. Just like you, we’re muddling through. I wrestled with whether to share my journey, but decided to go there, knowing that much learning comes from our darkest times. And so today, I offer some reflections on the power of vision in times of crises.

Shared Leadership

No doubt, Dad is in charge. But, Jill is a ninja in navigating the medical scene. When it’s time, she gently takes the helm.

Yesterday, Jane (who can run circles around Martha Stewart) ignored our exhausted surrender of “Let’s just get takeout for Easter,” and single-handedly cooked up a storm to make the day feel special. Ben and I took the video camera to their church and made a montage of personalized greetings from dozens of old friends against the backdrop of the choir singing the Hallelujah chorus. Brad took pics. The kids loved her with all their hearts and played as if the circumstances were perfectly normal.

A shared vision inspires people to use their gifts.

Pushing Boundaries

Turns out you can have an Easter Egg hunt in the hospice courtyard. Yes, you can drink Chardonnay out of hospital Dixie cups. (But, no the nurses don’t have a cork screw).

A strong shared vision inspires boundary pushing.

Willingness to Accept Help

When vision trumps ego, you’re willing to get whatever help needed to achieve your goal. Our family full of helpers is learning to say “Yes” to support we believe will make a difference.

A strong shared vision inspires receiving.

Open Communication

When the vision is clear, there’s less wasted communication. Direct, candid openness is key. Everyone needs to know the real deal to make the right decisions.

A strong shared vision inspires truth-speaking. 

Willingness to Learn New Skills

We’ve learned the names of the meds and the impact of doses, along with clever ways to accelerate our learning. “That medicine’s easy to remember… you know how your sister needs a new van? I just think of it as add-a-van.”

Whatever works.

A strong shared vision inspires learning.

Like every family, planning and execution is not always this smooth. I’m grateful that our shared vision is overpowering ego, personalities and pride.

It’s a strong reminder that during the toughest times in families, teams, communities or organizations, finding a shared vision is vital.

A strong shared vision makes the tough times easier. 

5 Ways to Ensure Your New Program, System, or Idea Is Adopted

From my perspective, the new system was genius. Instead of our enterprise customers typing in their service orders in an email for call center reps to retype them into our systems (which almost always contained errors) the customers now had an easy interface that would “flow through” to the backend systems. Faster, with higher quality, and an added bonus of working on weekends.

Only one problem, the reps (and their union) HATED it. And they had a point. What about white glove treatment for high-end customers? What about relationships?

The truth is both points were true. Large Enterprise customers wanted efficiency AND differentiated service from THEIR kind reps, like Kenetra. It wasn’t either/or. It wasn’t them or us. It was about working together on building a customer-focused adoption strategy.

And that’s why our Region led the Nation in “Flow Through.”

Although I give some tongue-in-cheek credit to my rendition of “The Flow Through Happens Tonight (to the tune of The Lion Sleeps Tonight). Thank God this silliness preceded YouTube.

If your program, system, or new idea isn’t gaining traction, don’t push– involve.

5 Ways to Ensure a Smoother Roll Out

1. Be Honest about the Benefits

ALL employees care about is WIFM (‘What’s in it for me’) is BS. Sure, employees want to know “What’s In It for them.” They equally want to know what’s in it for you and for THEIR customers. Leaving that part out just leaves them to fill in the blanks and make assumptions (i.e. the next thing you’re going to do is downsize). They want to know you’re thinking this through with your brain, and not just your pocketbook.

2. Start Small

Don’t start advocating for a system that’s not ready or full of flaws. Test it first with a small group, take their feedback seriously and get it right. It’s tough to regain credibility. “Oh yeah, I admit it sucked before, but now it’s better,” only leaves the masses wondering why some bozo made a choice to sing praises for a system that was full of problems in the real world. Even if you think it works well in the IT war room, field test it first. Yes, this takes time. Go slow to go fast.

In the example above, we worked the kinks out with one team and gave headquarters feedback until I’m sure they were sick of hearing from us (actually, me… never make your team be the bad guy). Take the risk of making some waves to make it easy for your team. We were slower out of the gate than most regions. But no one remembers that part of the story.

3. Establish Easy to Access Listening Posts

This is perhaps the most important part. Really listen to what your people are saying. Most importantlly, respond to feedback with solutions–not selling. When you fix something, communicate it back five times, five different ways.

4. Gather Reluctant Testimony

Lift up as many testimonials as you can. Get your most excited employees showing how your new idea, system or process changed their world. Your most influential stories will come from the least likely suspects: the sales guy who never bothered with this crap before; the new rep who’s now running circles around the old timers because she uses the system; the supervisor who got her entire team (including the union steward) doing Harlem Globe Trotter tricks with the system.

5. Involve the Team in Key Decisions

No one wants stuff done TO them, or even FOR them. WITH them goes a lot further. What’s working well and how do we leverage it? What enhancements do we need? Where should we head next? All these questions go a long way.

Are you facing a vital strategic change? Please give me a call at 443-750-1249 to discuss how I can best support you through consulting and speaking. Together we will achieve breakthrough results.

employee engagement

The Power of A Good Practical Joke

I had just been promoted to manager and head swim team coach of our neighborhood pool. My staff and I had spent the week brushing algae off tiles, making bulletin boards, and organizing schedules–we were ready for the launch of an amazing season.

I locked up my bike and unlocked the gate, a bit nervous, I was excited to lead the first practice of the season. The kids arrived, and after a few complaints about the extra cold water, jumped in to begin their warm up.

Suddenly, sweet “6-and-under” Ned started splashing and screaming like he’d seen a shark. “Miss Karin, Miss Karin, Come quick! I saw a fish!”

“Ned, calm down, you didn’t see a fish. Put your head in the water and keep swimming,” I replied, knowing that I needed to stand firm to keep credibility as a new leader not much older than most of the swimmers.

But then, my assistant coach, John, who had gotten in the water with the kids to show them it couldn’t be THAT cold, pulled himself out the pool and came running over. As he dripped on my sweatshirt he whispered:

“Uhhhh, Karin. There really is a fish.”

I quickly got everyone out of the pool and discovered that there was not just one fish, but THREE. The kids all jumped back in and tried to chase them with their bare hands. Ned ran home to get his fishing rod.

The phone rang.

It was Peter. The head coach of our rival swim team. “Just calling to congratulate you on your first day as head coach and pool manager. How’s it going?

“OMG, there are FISH IN MY POOL.” As soon as I got the words out I knew who had placed them there.

Well played.

A great start to a great season. Our rivalry turned from competitive angst to collaboration and real friendship.

April Fools Day Prep

“Taking the time to polish a pun or fine-tune a practical joke is a way of saying, ‘I’m thinking about you and I want to please you.”
Andrew Hudgin

In honor of April Fools Day, I’d love to hear your favorite practical joke stories. Who knows what shenanigans we may be able to inspire amongst our tribe.

See also Top 10 Office Practical Jokes (Matt McWilliams), Strategic Silliness:  When to Lighten the Mood (Karin Hurt)

In Other LGL News

Karin Hurt, CEOExciting to have my thought featured in this Time Magazine article:  5 Questions to Ask When You’re Looking For Feedback. It’s a nice collection of thinking worth sharing with your team.

If you’re looking to take your results to the next level, please give me a call at 443-750-1249 to discuss how I can help.

The 5 Biggest Succession Planning Mistakes

Succession planning, done well, creates brilliant competitive advantage. Poorly executed, at best it’s a waste of time, and often creates serious havoc on long term performance.

All words I’ve heard in the last 15 days: “Oh, we’re too small to need a formal process.” “Our business is moving so fast we don’t have time for that.” “We’re baby boomers and we don’t know how”(trust me, I would never have included this one until I heard it TWICE this week from different companies looking for help). And the scariest of all, “We’re a family owned-business so the decision is obvious.”

1. Talking People Before Priorities

Before you can decide WHO you need to be sure on WHAT. Think future vision and the competencies that will make that possible. Write them down. Then map your people against those possibilities. Choosing people for tomorrow based exclusively on today’s performance will slow you down.

2. Cloning

What often passes for “executive presence” is a desired mold. Be careful. Sure you want poise, effective communication, and a tidy together look, but the quirky challenger may just what you need to take your strategy to the next level. Too many like minds lead to uninspired strategy.

3. Letting Diversity Trump Common Sense

If you complete your 9 box succession planning grid and it’s all balding white guys with a dry sense of humor in box 9 you clearly have a problem. If it’s a perception problem. by all means challenge one another and make it right.

However, I often find this is less of an issue of discrimination at the succession table, than a problem with hiring and focused leadership development down the line. You can’t make anyone ready for the next level by talking yourselves into it or putting diversity multipliers on executive compensation.

The worse thing you can do is pad your “grid” by sliding diverse candidates into blocks where they don’t belong. Sure, identify opportunities for accelerated growth to make up for lost time. But NEVER promote an unqualified person for diversity reasons. You hurt them, your business, and weaken your diversity strategy.

4. False Consensus

You know you have a true box 9, high potential when every head at the table is chiming in with a resounding “Yes!”

A succession planning conversation without conflict is useless. The very best talent reviews involve robust discussion and lively debate which leads to important next steps (e.g. “You’ve got to know my guy better;” “She needs a stretch assignment.”) If I support your guy so you support mine, the business loses.

5. Ignoring the Plan

The worst succession planning sin of all is going through the motions, and then reverting to the old patterns “just this time” when it comes to promotion. Trust me, they next thing on everyone’s mind the next time you want to hold such a meeting is “Why bother?”

Don’t short change your talent strategy. The right people, at the right place, at the right time, will change the game. Be sure you’re prepared.

 

Karin Hurt, CEOIf you’re struggling with succession planning, I can help. I’ve facilitated hundreds of succession planning discussions over the years from the executive level, through merger integration, and at the frontline. Succession planning is worth doing well. Please give me a call for a free consultation, 443-750-1249.

The Real Definition of Employee Engagement

Ever since Gallup revealed their findings that 70% of workers are either disengaged or actively disengaged in their work, “employee engagement” has been all the buzz. Quite frankly, none of this is new, and anyone reading this blog knows that and is working hard to change the game.

Tonight, I started to write a different post (which I’ll save for Monday), but got sidetracked when for grins, I looked up Employee Engagement in the Urban Dictionary, searching for a pithy opener. I was shocked by the search results:

urban-dictionary

employee engagement isn’t defined.

Can you define it?

Game on.

Let’s do this!  Please leave your best definitions in the comment section here, and I’ll upload your responses (or just go for it and upload your own to Urban Dictionary). What an opportunity to tell the truth. Of course consider the medium–you’ll want to be “hip.”

P.S. my son Sebastian (9) reminded me the other day (after I commented on how “hip” he looked) that neither of us would know “hip” if it bit us in the butt… but “the way we looked now, was about as good as it gets.”

With that said, I’m quite sure our hip crowd is up to the challenge.

5 Ways to Strengthen Trust With Weak Ties

I would describe our meeting as a roll of the dice. Perhaps someday we will upgrade our relationship to “weak ties,” but yesterday we were just 2/850 at the Great Ideas Conference chatting through our freebie Hyatt sunglasses over lunchtime brisket and gluten-free potato salad. “Joe,” the CEO (named substituted for anonymity and rhyme), seemed genuinely intrigued by our LGL mission. He works with significant innovators (with a capital I– think people who will invent the next product you must have and will be willing to spend too much for.)

“Karin, what I’d be most interested to hear from you is how you build trust with weak ties. We depend on that. Getting true innovators to connect with and trust one another online and around the globe is a vital ingredient of real progress.”

Game on. I’ve got perspective (as Granovetter’s strength of weak ties theory is arguably my favorite communcation theory of all time), but I’m sure our LGL tribe is up to the challenge. Let’s go help Joe (and others ready to go) make positive change in our world.

5 Ways to Strengthen Trust With Weak Ties

All the components of the Green’s trust equation still apply (credibility + reliability + intimacy/ self orientation)

1. Share expertise (Credibility)

Share your good stuff. Showing up with real expertise will attract other curious and innovative souls. The more people are talking about your ideas, the higher the probability of being introduced to other experts with complementary or challenging views.

2. Respect Others Consistently (Reliability)

I’m always amazed at the stupidity of those who check out credentials before helping. Or treat folks differently based on letters behind their name or klout scores. Discriminatory respect ignores the strength of weak ties theory. Treat everyone with deep respect and you’ll be known as the “really great guy (or gal)” others “just have to meet.” The brother of the intern you met in the forum may turn out to be just who you need on your next project.

3. Do What You Say (Reliability)

It’s certainly easier to blow off a commitment to a weak tie than a colleague. You don’t have to help everyone, but if you say you will, do.

4. Be Real (Intimacy)

Don’t be a snob or tell us how wonderful you are, just show us through your ideas and engagement. Share a bit about yourself as a person. Be honest about where you’re stuck. Whether you’re around the world or sitting in the cube next door, human beings want to work with other human beings.

5. Give generously without expectation (Self-Orientation)

If you’re just out for yourself, people will smell it and tell their weak ties. Social media makes it easy folks, to warn the world. In my own collaborations, I’m consistently being warned of when to steer clear. “Trust checks” are often only a DM (Twitter Direct Message) away. (See also:  7 Reasons Collaboration Breaks Down.)

People trust people who know what they’re doing, who show up consistently with a generous heart. Be that guy, and your weak ties will quickly tighten into trusted bonds of true collaboration.

Other LGL Fun

Karin Hurt, CEO

I’ve had some fun with media interviews this week. A Fortune article on the hottest job trends, and Blogging and Marketing Tips by Experts on FirstSiteGuide and a round-up of most vital leaderhip characteristics. Tip: Blogging is a great way to give generously. Check out Matt Banner’s updated guide to starting a blog here.

5 Mistakes to Avoid During a Restructure

Times of downsizing and restucture require every ounce of confident humility you can muster. Your team is starving for information, reassurance, guidance and support. And quite frankly, I’m amazed at how many leaders totally screw this up. In part I blame lawyers that scare the humanity and common sense out of otherwise sensible human beings. But mostly, it’s layers of people not thinking through what it means to be at the other end of the conversation. Every one of these mistakes comes from real stories I’ve heard or witnessed in the last year.

1. Communicating Prematurely

“We’ve got some exciting changes next year which will include an important restructure to streamline efficiencies and operations. More to come after the holidays.” Seriously? Queue the massive energy drain, distraction, resume writing, sleepless nights, worried conversations, LinkedIn surfing, and butt kissing. Don’t communicate until you’ve got tangible information about structure and process. I’m all for transparency, but vague vision without information does nothing to inspire trust or engagement. Wait to say something until you know what you’re doing.

2. Restructuring in Waves

Common in large companies, “the planning team” thinks it make sense to go one department at a time. I get it from a workload point of view, but consider the ripple effect. The stress and rumors circle the company like a wave of hands moving across the stadium. “Where are they headed next?” “How many people got laid off?” “What process did they use?” “Did the good guys land?” You’ve taken what could have been a month’s worth of restructuring and spread the pain and suffering out across nine months to a year.

3. Sloppy Administration

“My direct report just found out his job was eliminated by an email, before I even knew it.” Even I couldn’t believe this stupidity. As it turned out it was a glitch in an HR system that got the proverbial cart ahead of the horse. I’ve experienced it directly too. I once received the entire restructuring plan, including all impacted names, intended for another “Karin.” I deleted it immediately and told the sender. A disgruntled employee could easily have sent it to the Wall Street Journal.

4. Not Thinking Through the Details

“I’ve got 60 days to find a job.”

“And what happens if you don’t?”

“I get a package.”

“What does the package include?”

“They haven’t decided yet.”

Before you tell someone there job is impacted, image the next five questions you would ask if you were in their shoes. If you don’t have the answers, get them first.

5. Underestimating the Angst

“And it’s important that no one miss a beat during this time, we’ve got work to do.” Of course that’s true, but if people are worried about their livelihood, they’ll put first things first. Pretending a big deal is no big deal will just reduce your credibility. Be available for support and as a sounding board. Give them the time they need to process, and they’ll likely go back to work more focused.

Restructuring is often a necessary, bold leadership move. Be sure your execution is as solid as your plan.

 

Situational Confident Humility: A Self Assessment #confidenthumility

A participant in one of my sessions took me aside and said:

I totally agree with your concept. It’s the execution that’s hard. When I’m truly confident that my team can win, I’m able to calmly step back and humbly listen to their ideas. I know that sweet spot you’re talking about where the real magic happens. But it’s when I need that magic most, when my boss is breathing down my back, or I actually don’t know what to do, that I start acting like a jerk and barking orders. Intellectually, it makes no sense. I know that behavior sets me back, but I keep getting stuck in the same patterns.

Confident humility is not a fixed state. Most of us are either more confident or more humble in certain situations. In order to help you think through this, I’ve created a confident humility self assessment based on a frequency scale. Take a look and see how often you do these behaviors–and which circumstances inspire or hinder your ability to be the leader you strive to be.

leading with confident humility assessment (click here to download PDF).

Situational Confident Humility

Confidence

In what scenes do you…

  • Bring significant subject matter expertise to the team?
  • Take a stand when needed?
  • Ask tough questions that make people think?

Humility

In what scenes do you…

  • Recognize your vulnerabilities and knowledge gaps?
  • Admit mistakes?
  • Feel more concerned about business results than who gets the credit?

Vision

In what scenes do you …

  • Help your team imagine possibilities they may have not considered?
  • Uncover potential?
  • Make a lasting impact?

Connection

In what scenes do you…

  • Invest deeply to get to know the business?
  • Take time to get to know leaders as people?
  • Listen carefully?

Ah, and as a bonus… my favorite tweet of the week.

I like that… beats the hell out of