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Who Decides Your Future?

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It’s been a long day, turning into tomorrow, but I can’t get her out of my mind.  Ling (not her real name) bravely raised her hand in my Masters level leadership class tonight. “Professor, I see how these techniques would be important for someone who could accomplish something great, but it’s hard to apply for someone like me…”

I gave more examples and stories of how these basic techniques are easily used in motivating frontline teams or to stand out in an interview.

Again, Ling shook her head.

Let me step back and paint a picture. Ling is early in her career, from China, taking a masters level curriculum completely in English. Life is tricky. Visas are uncertain. She’s a rock star contributor– thinking deeply and expressing great insights. She cares, she tries, she knows a great deal. She’s scared.

Someone like me…

I paused to hear more.

Ling continued, “I’m not going to accomplish anything like THAT.”

Next, a few more few anxious nods. Not from the men.

And I’m left with the nagging question so many of us feel.

“Am I someone who could accomplish something great?”

Who, or what, limits our belief that we can be great?

What’s the right level of audacious hope?

I’m sure she’s thinking, “For God’s sakes Professor, just give me enough practical advice to land a job.”

We’ll go there. But I’m not sure that advice will work.

“One notch above” won’t differentiate or lead an employer to go the extra mile to take on immigration.

Being remarkable takes bold moves, differentiated thinking, and a really strong “why.”

In an uneven playing field who defines remarkable?

How do you build audacious confidence amidst a chorus of assimilation advice to “just fit in?”

This is not just Ling’s story.

Her journey is hard. Yours is too. You can be the guy who “accomplishes something great.”

In fact, we’re counting on it.

Karin Hurt, CEO

Other LGL News

I’m delighted to announce I’ve signed a book publishing contract with AMACOM with co-author David Dye. Working title is Winning Well:  How to Lead Your Team to the Top Without Losing Your Soul.  We’re headed for an early Spring release, stay tuned for ways to get involved.

I also had fun this week with a feature article on Yahoo:  What to Do When Your Boss Drives You Crazy

Are you looking for a keynote speaker or some support in taking your team to the next level? Please give me a call for a free consultation. 443 750-1249.

Your turn. What advice do you have for “Jing?”
Filed Under:   Authenticity & Transparency, Career & Learning, Communication, confident humility
 
 
Karin Hurt
Karin Hurt
Karin Hurt helps leaders around the world achieve breakthrough results, without losing their soul. A former Verizon Wireless executive, she has over two decades of experience in sales, customer service, and HR. She was recently named on Inc's list of 100 Great Leadership Speakers, AMA's 50 Leaders to Watch in 2015, & Top Thought Leader in Trust by Trust Across America. She’s the author of 2 books: Winning Well: A Manager's Guide to Getting Results-Without Losing Your Soul and Overcoming an Imperfect Boss.
 

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What People Are Saying

Megan Constantino   |   10 April 2015   |   Reply

Dear Ling:

Keep learning from and listening to your professor, Karin Hurt. She will continue to inspire you. She inspires me. The sky is the limit for you.

My best,

Megan Constantino

Paul Robbins   |   10 April 2015   |   Reply

Our most important work as leaders is to help our sister and brother human beings find their own greatness and use their greatness to be leaders. “I see the real you, who is great, reflect that back to you, and I support you and hold you accountable for manifesting that greatness every day.”

Imagine a family, team, organization, community, society…humanity when we are all leading from our unique greatness. Find our voices and lead others to find theirs, and then we experience our full potential together.

Given the current climate crisis to humanity, we need everyone on board, leading together to transform our lives and our world. Everyone has talents to share and issues on which to lead.

Paul Robbins   |   10 April 2015   |   Reply

Our most important work as leaders is to help our sister and brother human beings find their own greatness and use their greatness to be leaders. “I see the real you, who is great, reflect that back to you, and I support you and hold you accountable for manifesting that greatness every day.”

Imagine a family, team, organization, community, society…humanity when we are all leading from our unique greatness. Find our voices and lead others to find theirs, and then we experience our full potential together.

Given the current climate crisis to humanity, we need everyone on board, leading together to transform our lives and our world. Everyone has talents to share and issues on which to lead.

Terri Klass   |   10 April 2015   |   Reply

First of all, congratulations on the book! So exciting!

Success begets success and taking action in some way helps people transform into leaders who build on their achievements. It isn’t a fair playing field, yet many leaders emerge through sheer determination and hard work.

I would coach Jing to discover who she really is, what she wants to share with the work world and just go out and interview. Information interviews can be so helpful to learn about the possibilities. But she must not look at “no”as a forgone conclusion. Network. Meet people. Show the world your stuff.

Good luck Karin!

LaRae Quy   |   10 April 2015   |   Reply

I really agree with Terri on this one: encourage Ling and everyone else in that class to discover what they care about and ways they can pursue a career that gives them both value and meaning.

Anything less than that will end up with frustration, disappointment, and recriminations. That’s the same advice I would give anyone, male or female, citizen or immigrant.

There is some deep fear lurking inside…but we all know that if we are competent at what we do, this is still the land of opportunity.

Dallas Tye   |   13 April 2015   |   Reply

“In fact, we’re counting on it”. I like that a lot. Delivered well, I think it can be very powerful.

Its encouraging to have expectations set for us, and certainly helps the receiver answer the question, “can I accomplish something great”.

Congrats on the book. Very excited for you :)