Unleashing Breakthrough Results

Many of the approaches we take to solving problems, do just that. Solve problems. That works, until the next problem comes along. To build long-term results, requires more. Unleashing your team’s potential leads to breakthrough results.

I’ve been intrigued by the unleashing approach described in the new white paper, Unleashing the Future of Work.

This highly collaborative methodology empowers teams to dig deeper for answers– working together to find synergistic solutions.

“The cornerstone of Unleashing™ is emphasizing the journey as an essential change and learning process rather than simply devising and implementing a solution. For it is through this journey that individuals learn and develop their ability to think strategically, collaborate and take action. This approach aims to engage and stimulate people as they go along, creating self-efficacy, empowerment and commitment in the individuals and teams. Its focus is both on the organisation as a whole and on the individuals.”

Unleashing Framework

The research-based unleashing approach, is closely aligned with the philosophical approach we’ve been discussing in our LGL community. For example:

  • “Purpose as basis for strategy” vs. “Shareholder value as basis for strategy” (and driving shareholder value in the process)
  • “Shared strategic direction” vs. “Strategic planning”
  • “Adaptive strategy execution” vs. “Strategy implementation”
  • “Learning through action” vs. “Classroom training”
  • “Process innovation” vs. “Process optimization”
  • “Mentoring, self-directed career development” vs. “Metrics-based performance management”

I asked white paper co-author, Therese Kinal, about the inspiration for their research:

“My co-founders Robert Thong, Corrina Kane and I realized that traditional approaches to Management weren’t working anymore and our industry was doing as much harm as it was good. In many organisations innovation was dead and employees had little or no understanding of their company’s strategy and they certainly didn’t feel personal ownership and excitement about making it happen. Companies had tried to solve this through structural changes, sending their people on leadership development training or hiring innovation firms to do it for them. Consultants were forcing through simplistic solutions to complex problems.”

If you’re looking for creative ways to unleash the powerful potential of your team, it’s worth a read. Share your comments and insights with the LGL community.

Hustle Factor: He Who Hustles Gets the Ball

Do you hustle enough, or are you counting on traditional rules to win? Each memorial weekend we camp with 100 of our closest friends from church. The multi-generation soccer game following the pot luck dinner has become a bit of a tradition. At times there are as many as 50 people on the field ranging from ages 4 to “I’d rather not say,” playing with mostly unspoken rules the most important of which is, “nobody squash the little kids.”

“The greatest shortage in our society is an instinct to produce. To create solutions and hustle them out the door. To touch the humanity inside and connect to the humans in the marketplace.”

This year, my friend K.P. shouted out a new rule early in the game. “When the ball goes out-of-bounds, whichever team hustles fastest to retrieve it gets to throw it in.” Fantastic. A hustle rule: Hustle gains advantage

This drove the seasoned soccer players bonkers particularly the analytical, athletic teens (and a few of their Dads). “That’s not fair ” “But that would mean..” Enough grown-ups (most of whom had taught these kids in Sunday School) responded with enthusiasm, so the rule prevailed. Not particularly democratic, but I was on the side of “let’s use our position power to create this experiment.” Game on.

What Happens With Hustle

With hustle, underdogs willing to work, gain the advantage. In this case the under 6 crowd now had a definitive skill set to contribute. Boundless energy and an ability to slip under the old fence quickly.

  • The game changes. Effort counts a lot. When effort counts, people make more effort. Go figure.
  • The game’s more fun when hustle matters, adrenaline goes up.
  • No referee. No playback needed. Not, “who kicked it out.” Whoever’s got the ball has the advantage. Let’s keep playing.

In a super-connected world, hustle matters more than ever. Tradition will try to reinforce protocol, but in the end hustle rules. The best idea can be out run by the great idea with serious effort.

Leaders must hustle. The rules are changing. Get up early. Build a bigger network. Share that new idea. Stay up late. Engage others. Work harder. Watch less TV. Work even harder. Invest in your contribution. Gain the advantage. Hustle more

Should I Quit My Job?

Don’t quit. What doesn’t kill us makes us stronger. Only the strong survive. But what if you’re in the wrong job? If you quit now, did you fail? Or win?

A subscriber wrote to me this week:

“Are there days you want to just quit? I am truly at that point and need to get some advice on how to push through. I am just not happy where I am at the moment.”

After talking to him for a while, we both knew. He was in the wrong job. After many years of tremendous success in individual contributor roles, he’d spent the last few years in a supervisory position.

He’s worked hard. Learned new techniques. Read the best blogs. But, he was miserable. He didn’t want to “quit” for fear of failing. So he worked harder, and felt worse. Perhaps you’ve felt this way.

9 Indications You’re In The Wrong Job

You’re…

  1. Grouchy – Cranky leaders spiral downward, lose influence, and sap energy.
  2. Not Making An Impact – Effort exceeds results. Dissatisfaction dominates. Teams disengage. You go home defeated.
  3. Unable To find Your People – No kindred spirits in sight. Unsuccessful searching for respected mentors aggravates the loneliness.
  4. Not Using Your Skills – Wasted gifts. No matter how hard you try, you can’t find a good way to leverage your best skills to improve your work.
  5. Emotionally Exhausted – Even the fun stuff feels hard. There’s no energy left for the after work activities that make life good.
  6. Trapped – Motivations comes from the periphery, not the job money, benefits, fear of having failed. You secretly wish you’d get fired.
  7. Overwhelmed – It’s all too much. There’s no way to get it all done.
  8. Quiet – Your refuse to talk about work to your family or friends. Even the question, how was your day makes your hair curl.
  9. Sick – A day off makes it worse. Thinking of the return creates headaches or inspires escape behaviors.

What would you add?

Before You Quit

It may be you’re in the wrong job. That’s okay. There’s a right job out there. Quitting doesn’t make you a quitter. Here are some suggestions:

  • Go slow. It’s much easier to get a job when you have a job.
  • Keep up the effort at your current job. Don’t quit in place.
  • Take care of yourself. Take a vacation. Take time to exercise and sleep.
  • Think about other jobs orvolunteer gigs that you loved. What skills did you use? What did you find most fulfilling? Make a list of these characteristics.
  • Arrange for informational interviews. Learn more about jobs you may enjoy.
  • Talk to your boss (pause first)
  • Share your feelings and explore options. Your boss may be relieved that you see the issue. Listen. There may be ways to modify your situation, or find other jobs within the organization that are a better fit.

What would you add?

Pause for Effectiveness: 9 Powerful Times to Pause

Your team needs you, you respond. They have questions, you have answers. The phone rings, you pick it up. Great leadership? A pause can be more powerful. Speakers pause for effect; Great leaders pause for effectiveness.

A powerful pause is a wildly under utilized leadership tool. Awkward silence creates opportunity. I’ve never regretted a pause. I’ve got buckets-full of “I wish I had paused” moments. When in doubt, pause more often.

9 Powerful Pauses

A pause gives you both time to think. Pauses calm emotions. Pregnant pauses give birth to vibrant ideas. 7 situations where pausing is most powerful. Let’s pass the pause, what would you add?

  1. Compliments – You’ve been given a tremendous compliment. Pause and take it in. Look them back in the eye, with a sincere thank you. Pause amplifies appreciation.
  2. Sad News – Sad or disappointing news is often shocking. It’s difficult to know what to say. Give your heart time to adjust. Connect–then speak.
  3. Anger (yours) – Sometimes a grown-up “time-out” is the best remedy. Step back. Think more. If you really want to say “it,” there will be time. You will likely find better words after a breather.
  4. Anger (theirs) – They’re spitting teeth. Accusations. Exaggerated facts. Misrepresented viewpoints. You’re tempted to respond immediately. You must clear it up. They interrupt, you talk faster, or louder. They’ll hear you more clearly after a good pause. If you stop talking so will they. They may even breathe in the process.
  5. Ideas (yours) – If your idea’s that great, it will still be there after others have had a chance to talk. In fact, it will be even better if you use it to build on what others have to say. Let others talk first, then share.
  6. 6. Ideas (theirs) – Pause. Let them keep going. Let them build on their thinking. Nod, smile, encourage. Try not saying a word, until they get it all out.
  7. No Ideas – It’s amazing how often people will talk until they have something to say. If you don’t know, go slow. Quiet creates contribution.
  8. Silence – Now it’s even more tempting to fill the space. No one else is talking, and you’re the leader. Best for you to set the stage? Maybe. Or what if you said, “Yikes, this one’s tough. let’s all take a minute to consider the options.”
  9. Ring-a-ling – Most of the time when the phone rings or the text beeps in, we answer right away. Sometimes necessary. Sometimes not. Consider a pause to stay in the moment. Then call back with complete attention.
  10. What would you add?

Distracted Driving: Lead with Care

You’re distracted. Multi-tasking. Getting work done. You’re trying hard to give everyone the attention they need. It’s hard. If you’re like me, being spread too thin leads to distracted focus.

Distraction speaks louder than words.

Today’s post, Distraction Speaks Louder than Words,  comes via the Lead Change Group, a terrific community of leadership thinkers. My inspiration for this topic came from comments on my Effective Listening: Necessary But Not Sufficient post.

Distracted Driving at Work

What Your Team Hears When You Can’t Hear Them…

  • You are not that important to me
  • Others matter more
  • Your project is not my priority
  • Your project is not important
  • I don’t respect your opinion
  • I don’t really care about you
  • I’m not invested in your success read more here

Happy Memorial Day From Let’s Grow Leaders. Lead well. Drive safely.

9 Ways to Maximize Your College Leadership Experience

I’m often asked which colleges are the best for “leadership.” The short answer is “most will do just fine.” As with most of life, it’s what you make of it. College is a great place to grow as a leader.

Much of your leadership learning will come from peripheral aspects of the college experience. Being involved. Living with strangers. Leading without authority. Getting along in diverse groups. Projects with assigned (potentially lazy) teams. Live it deeply. Make mistakes. Try new approaches. Keep leading and learning.

This post is for my son, Ben, and other young leaders graduating high school and heading to college. I’ve collected advice from seasoned leaders across the globe. If you aren’t headed to college, please comment with your advice, and pass the post along to an aspiring young leader.

Annette Schmeling, VP of Student Development at University of Dayton, suggests making a specific plan.

  • Focus first on Academic Success
  • Identify 3-5 “activities outside the classroom” to be involved in. List the activities, explain why they are important to you
  • Make connections with the career services office and learn about internships and professional development opportunities starting the freshmen year
  • Learn how to utilize social media tools to engage with others. Start early to establish a purpose-fueled online reputation

9 Ways to Learn Leadership at College (advice from the online “village”)

1. Solve Problems

Find something your passionate about and work to improve it. Dan Rockwell suggests, “gathering together” with other students to solve problems.

2. Take Risks

Get comfortable with discomfort. Don’t jump out of the 2nd story classroom (like my friend did at Wake Forest he’s stupid, but fine), but do wise things that scare you. Will Lukang says, “take risks and push yourself out of your comfort zone.” Mario Marquez shares, “Look for the uncomfortable and controversial situations, the hot potatoes that the majority will stay away from.”

3. Learn who you are

You will do great things, and many silly ones. Learn from it all. Keep reflecting on, and refining, your values. Learn to lead and lead to learn. And as Alaska Chick says, “Walk the talk and do what you say.”

4. Volunteer

The most consistent advice I received is “volunteer.” Get involved. Spend time in the community.

“Get involved in the college’s outreach programs. Most colleges have programs to tutor high school students who are not passing graduation exams, community clean-up programs, political activist groups, debate groups, open theater programs get involved. Being in college can be about so much more than just getting a degree for what’s next.”

5. Build a Network

Hang out with all kinds of people. Find your niches, but don’t limit yourself. That weird guy may be up to something fantastic. It’s great to build a network of diverse communities. Network extensively through social media and make genuine connections. Mike Henry, Sr. suggests, “select friends carefully.”

“Grow your leadership skills in the place that sparks your passion – opportunities are everywhere. If you don’t feel the click, keep exploring until you do.”

6. Learn Extra

Attend the free lectures. Take crazy courses unrelated to your major. Listen with your heart. Take a full course load. Stay up late talking with your friends about what they are learning. Donald George suggests, “develop a variety of leadership skills and apply the most appropriate approach to fit that specific situation.”

7. Find Mentors

Invest in getting to know your professors. I have a few lifelong mentors (now friends) that began as professors. Help them with their research. Drink coffee with them. You will be amazed at the opportunities that can emerge. Also find mentors in the community and in areas of interest. Connect with mentors across all walks of life.

“Find leaders you look up to and ask them to mentor you. Serve on their teams so as to watch, observe, and learn. Work hard, build good relationships, and after your studies are done, volunteer your heart out.”

8. Learn Think, Write and Speak

Take classes that challenge you to organize and articulate your point of view. Take lots of writing and speaking classes. Consider an improv or other theater class. Get really comfortable in front of people. If you hate public speaking, keep taking classes until you don’t.

9. Work Hard

Dan McCarthy shared a combination of quotes from Chuck Yeager and Vince Lombardi: “There’s no such thing as a natural-born leader. All great leaders got that way from hard work, not from some endowed gift. Thank goodness. Don’t cheat yourself with the easy way out. Or as Pop Pop says:

“I still endorse the advice from the talk “What college is and what it isn’t ” I heard in my senior year of high school in 1959 from the vice president of Rensselaer Polytechnic.
His point: you need to have a goal that motivates you, and apply yourself passionately in pursuing the goal. It does not matter if you change your goal later on, you probably will, several times. What matters is that you do the best you can with what you are working toward at any given time. I think that advice holds up, in college and after. The connection to leadership? If you know where you are going and give it your all, you will find folks will follow your lead.”

@theteapixie summarizes it well.

@LetsGrowLeaders Get involved. Be an example worth emulating. Be engaged. Be interested. Be active. Make face-2-face happen.”

 Know someone graduating and headed to college? A Free Subscription to Let’s Grow Leaders makes a wonderful gift for Grads.. and Dads)

Orchestra Without a Conductor

This was a farewell. The last concert of the year for the high-school orchestra. The seniors wore roses and beamed with personality.

The conductor held up his baton, and the music began. Powerful. Brilliant. Exciting. A send-off to the next phase of their lives.

Then he looked at the orchestra and grinned. He stepped off the podium stage right, folded his arms, and watched from the sidelines. 5 measures later, he looked at the audience. Smiled with confidence, and walked off the stage. He never came back.
The orchestra continued. Powerful. Brilliant. More exciting. I sat mesmerized by the leadership moment. They didn’t miss a beat. They were performing– without their leader. Or were they?

He left confident that…

  • the vision was understood
  • they had a game plan
  • they were accomplished players
  • who had practiced
  • and would listen to one another

His confidence said…

  • I believe in you
  • You’re ready for the next phase
  • It was never about me
  • Go be brilliant

No conductor. Powerful leader.

The Secret to Employee Engagement

“How do I get my team to care?” Employee engagement is the number one requested topic from my readers. If you’re struggling with employee engagement, you’re not alone. Gallup says:

“Seventy-one percent of American workers are “not engaged” or “actively disengaged” in their work, meaning they are emotionally disconnected from their workplaces and are less likely to be productive.”

The disengagement increases with education. Americans with a college degree are “significantly less likely to be engaged in their jobs than are those with a high school diploma or less.” We hire for knowledge and then discourage contribution.

The Secret to Employee Engagement

I recently met with 2 new hire training classes. One was alive, actively interested, asked great questions, and shared their optimism for their careers. The other class looked at me skeptically. Didn’t say much. Yawns were involved.

My colleage looked at me after my meetings, “Wow, what a difference in engagement between those two groups.” What was the difference? The hiring demographics? The trainer? Frontline leadership? Nope.

Look Within First

It was me. I approached the first class as I normally do. I walked around the room and asked each person to introduce themselves– to tell me something about them personally. I heard of new babies, graduations, hobbies. I also asked them to share “why they will be a rock star in this position.” As they shared, I linked their ideas to key messages I wanted to reinforce. Then, I shared a bit about me both at work and at home. After all that, we started the Q &A.

It was time consuming and we were short on time. As I entered the next classroom, I was warned “you took too long with the last class, we’re behind on the agenda, and we have a plane to catch.” I skipped the one-on-one intro stuff, and moved right to Q and A. Sure I was energetic and perky, but there was no trust. It wasn’t personal. I felt scary, and the yawns began. In hindsight, I should have skipped that class.

If you can’t engage well, don’t show up.

As leaders we set the tone for employee engagement.

  • Make it personal
  • Ask questions
  • Share yourself
  • Create connection
  • Inspire confidence
  • Assure them they matter
  • Insire a compelling vision
  • Link unique skills to the vision
  • Be fully engaged yourself
  • ?

Talent Reviews: What They’re Saying Behind Closed Doors

The talent you count on as central to your brand could rub people the wrong way. What you do well, may not do you well.

After two decades participating in talent reviews, I’ve noticed a pattern. The talents candidates count on as central to their brand, are often talked about negatively when assessing their readiness for promotion. Be aware of what decision makers may be saying about you. Your strengths may be weakened in other’s eyes.

5 Talents Reviewed (ups and downs)

Here’s what I’ve heard said about good guys behind their backs. Worry that addressing over-used talents will stifle current performance.

Your boss knows, but you don’t grow.

Be aware of your talent and both sides of the conversation.

1. Servant Leadership

To Your Face: “You always put your team first.” “You avoid the politics and do what’s right for the customer.” “Thanks for creating that culture.”
Behind Closed Doors: “He can’t manage up. “He doesn’t sell his work.”

2. Passion

To Your Face: “I love your passion and energy!” “Your passion inspires your team.”
Behind Closed Doors: “She’s a bit much.” “Is he for real?” “Why is she so excited?” “We need to work on executive presence.”

3. Expertise

To Your Face: “You’re my go-to guy.” “I won’t attend an important meeting without you.” “No one knows “X” better than you.”
Behind Closed Doors:  “Can he move across functions?” “We can’t afford to lose him in his current role.”

4. Sponsors

To Your Face: “You’ve got Joe in your corner. He loves you, that goes a long way.”
Behind Closed Doors “What’s going on here? Why is he so focused on her career?” “Sure, Joe’s his fan, but who else knows him?” “What other relationships has he built?

5. Results

To Your Face:  “Your results are amazing.” “I know if I give it to you it will be done well.”
Behind closed doors: “I get she has results in this function but can she scale?

Don’t Lose You

I don’t want you to be less passionate or to hide your expertise. Neither do they. Use your gifts, and be sensitive to unintended consequences.

  • Understand that your talent can get in the way
  • Talk to your boss about how you’re viewed by others
  • Ask others if they see downsides to your talents
  • Pause after receiving feedback show you’re open for more
  • Observe others with similar style, what annoys you about their approach?
  • Ask what do the other execs think about my style?

Build on your talent with awareness. Ask for input. Adjust with authenticity.

Talent Reviews: What They're Saying Behind Closed Doors

The talent you count on as central to your brand could rub people the wrong way. What you do well, may not do you well.

After two decades participating in talent reviews, I’ve noticed a pattern. The talents candidates count on as central to their brand, are often talked about negatively when assessing their readiness for promotion. Be aware of what decision makers may be saying about you. Your strengths may be weakened in other’s eyes.

5 Talents Reviewed (ups and downs)

Here’s what I’ve heard said about good guys behind their backs. Worry that addressing over-used talents will stifle current performance.

Your boss knows, but you don’t grow.

Be aware of your talent and both sides of the conversation.

1. Servant Leadership

To Your Face: “You always put your team first.” “You avoid the politics and do what’s right for the customer.” “Thanks for creating that culture.”
Behind Closed Doors: “He can’t manage up. “He doesn’t sell his work.”

2. Passion

To Your Face: “I love your passion and energy!” “Your passion inspires your team.”
Behind Closed Doors: “She’s a bit much.” “Is he for real?” “Why is she so excited?” “We need to work on executive presence.”

3. Expertise

To Your Face: “You’re my go-to guy.” “I won’t attend an important meeting without you.” “No one knows “X” better than you.”
Behind Closed Doors:  “Can he move across functions?” “We can’t afford to lose him in his current role.”

4. Sponsors

To Your Face: “You’ve got Joe in your corner. He loves you, that goes a long way.”
Behind Closed Doors “What’s going on here? Why is he so focused on her career?” “Sure, Joe’s his fan, but who else knows him?” “What other relationships has he built?

5. Results

To Your Face:  “Your results are amazing.” “I know if I give it to you it will be done well.”
Behind closed doors: “I get she has results in this function but can she scale?

Don’t Lose You

I don’t want you to be less passionate or to hide your expertise. Neither do they. Use your gifts, and be sensitive to unintended consequences.

  • Understand that your talent can get in the way
  • Talk to your boss about how you’re viewed by others
  • Ask others if they see downsides to your talents
  • Pause after receiving feedback show you’re open for more
  • Observe others with similar style, what annoys you about their approach?
  • Ask what do the other execs think about my style?

Build on your talent with awareness. Ask for input. Adjust with authenticity.

Prove it! Growing Leaders One Proof at a Time

They think it can’t be done. You do. Now you’ve got to prove it. Game on. Nothing’s more inspirational than having something to prove.

My team has spent the last 2 years proving “the impossible.” The more folks told us “it” wouldn’t work, the more fired up we got.

We wanted to prove that culture drives results– and culture can be built. It’s not only about extrinsic rewards. Engagement counts. So do trusted relationships. Partner. Inspire. Give both ways. Through an extensive collaboration across multiple companies, we’re creating complex proof that culture matters. Proving it is fun, inspiring, and leaves us salivating for more.

The hungry for more part is important, because proving yourself is never handled. Bill Treasurer told me, “even at your funeral, it’s likely you still will be proving something.” Leaders need to get used to that inspiring feeling. Prove yourself early and often then do it again.

5 Ways to “Prove It”

Tap into your team’s innate desire to “prove” something. They will grow. Magic will happen. Results will breakthrough. You’ll have some fun. Here’s how.

  1. Offer challenging assignments
    Offer projects that stretch your team beyond their comfort zone. Find impossible missions. Pick work that’s closely aligned with their innate passion or career goals.
  2. Create concrete goals
    The goal must be clear. What exactly are you looking to prove? How will you know when you have achieved it?
  3. Find some naysayers
    Create a rallying cry to “prove it” to those guys goes a long way
  4. Scaffold their growth
    Be the guy that believes in the mission, leave the nay saying to the others. It doesn’t feel good to have to prove something to your boss. Support them as they prove it to others.
  5. Repeat the cycle
    Celebrate the proofs, and then be ready with the next challenge. Keep them growing.

Frontline Festival-May 2013: Trust and Transparency Edition

Welcome to the May Frontline Festival. Thanks to all the amazing thought leaders sharing their perspectives on Trust and Transparency.

Building Trust

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership says you “can’t build trust,” in his post How do I trust thee? Trust is important, but it has more than one dimension. I like that he differentiates between being trusted as a person and being trusted as a leader, with salient examples of a newly promoted team leader.

New to the Festival, Henna Inam, of Transformational Leadership, shares her post How To Influence Others Powerfully. She explores the linkage between influence and trust. I agree with her statement, “influence expands in direct proportion to trust and connection.”

Jonathan Green, of Monster Leaders, shares The Three Rules for a Prospering Work Culture. Jonathan teaches, “Sharing is caring. It is critically important to keep people in the know and connect them through honesty, sharing experiences and promoting open dialogue.”

Trusting Your Team

“He who does not trust enough, Will not be trusted.”
~Lao Tzu

Lolly Daskal of Lead From Within offers great advice for building trust in her post, Just Trust Me. My favorite point, “Trust is a two-way street. To make someone trustworthy, you need to trust them first. The best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them.”More leaders need this message.

John Hunter of Curious Cat shares, Trust Your Staff to Make Decisions. “Often the basic problem is managers don’t trust their systems to hire and develop people. The solution to this problem is not to give your staff no authority. The solution is to manage your systems so that you can trust your people.”

Mark Miller of Great Leaders serve shares his post Great Teams Take a Leap of Faith we must trust that building community will reap rewards.

Trusting Yourself

“You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something – your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.
~Steve Jobs

Dan McCarthy, of Great Leadership shares, Authentic Leadership Development: Your Past, Present and Future He shares, “Becoming an authentic leader involves transformation. It’s not “doing” leadership, it’s figuring out who you are and who you want to be as a leader.”

I love this post from Eric Dingler of ericdingler.com, because he starts by considering how you trust yourself. Are You the Leader The Team You Are Looking to Lead Is Looking to Follow? He asks provocative questions: “Would you follow you? Are you trustworthy? Do you really want what’s best for your team? Are you in it for them? Do you let your team get to know you? Would you want your kids to grow up and work for you?”

Matt McWilliams of Life. Leadership. Love. Learned the Hard Way. Shares his journey toward becoming a better leader in, Feedback for Leaders (Or, You Suck, Sincerely, Your Team). I admire his candid insights.

Leigh Steere shares her Lead Change post, Your Executive Title Does Not Make You a Leader. She interviews an exec who chose to leave her leadership post, in order to remain a leader. “Laura concluded, “I was actively uninspired. I could not stay, because I am a leader.” Powerfully provocative.

Elements of Trust

I love the angle taken by Joan Kofodimos of Teleos Consulting in her post, The Dark Side of Trust. She provides specific actions we can take to “take responsibility for identifying your own interests and negotiate to get them met.” Sometimes what feels like a breach of trust, may be a gap in expectations.

Tal Shnall of Habits of the Heart, breaks down several components of trust in his post, The Meaning of Trust. My favorite, “if you are willing to place other people’s concerns and aspirations on the top of your agenda, you will be able to expand the trust with them for the long run.”

Linda Fisher Thornton of Leading in Context asks What Variables Impact How Freely We Extend Trust. She has a nice list, what would you add?

Greg Marcus of Idolbuster shares a chapter from his excellent book, Busting Your Corporate Idol, Who to Trust at Work.

When Trust Breaks Down

“Never trust anything that can think for itself if you can’t see where it keeps its brain.”
~J.K. Rowling

New to the Festival, Skip Prichard of Skip Prichard Leadership Insights, interviews Scott Weiss on the “crises of trust” in his post, The Challenge of Trusting Leadership. He invites Weiss to “speak to the new graduate who is just starting out. What can he or she do to avoid the shocking experience you had when you first were exposed to these concepts?”

Blair Glaser  exposes the risks of following in Are You Strong Enough to Be My Fan. My favorite line, “There is a way to follow that won’t set you or the leader up for a fall. You’ve got to be strong. You’ve got to recognize the human fallibility in all of us.”

Bob Winchester shares  Five Reasons Your Boss Doesn’t Trust You– How To Break Through Corporate Culture Revolution. He also offers tips for recovering when you screw up.

David Dye, of Trailblaze shares, Can We Really Trust Your Leadership? He’s got an interesting story that will make you feel better about your driving, as well as tips for building trust in the midst of a mistake.

Transparency

“What passes for woman’s intuition is often nothing more than man’s transparency.”
~George Jean Nathan

Dan Rockwell of Leadership Freak, exposes the dangers of hiding your views in Death to Bobble Head Leaders. “Leaders become bobble heads to protect position and get promoted. It’s dishonest and disingenuous. Look around. How many bobbing heads sit at the table?” The best question, “Is anyone disruptive?”

Jennifer V. Miller of The People Equation says that leadership bloggers are fond of touting “transparency” as a path to authentic leadership. But are there times when disclosure is not the best policy? Find out in her post Is Leadership Transparency Always the Best Policy?

Also new to the Festival, Randy Conley,shares Four Strategies to Increase Organizational Trust & Transparency. In today’s fast-paced, globally connected business world in which we live, an organization’s successes and failures can be tweeted across the internet in a matter of seconds. A knee jerk reaction of many organizational leaders is to clamp down on the amount of information shared internally, with hopes of minimizing risk to the organization. Many times this backfires and ends up creating a culture of risk aversion and low trust.

Jon Mertz, of Thin Difference shares Trust: At the Speed of Social Media. As Generation Y or Millennials grow in workplace presence, this new definition of transparency (Transparency = Accountability) is a reality. Jon shares some of my same concerns over the over-use of the word “transparency.” He writes, ” personally, I never like the word transparent. It seems so flimsy; something high-priced people say. It has become bureaucratic-speak or position talking points. With social media, transparency turns into immediate accountability, which is what it should be.”with social media, transparency turns into immediate accountability, which is what it should be.”

Becky Robinson, of Weaving Influence asks, what is the right level of transparency, in her post, Transparency. The post elicited an excellent comment, worth reading, it begins. “I think that there is a danger here of mistaking transparency with openness (and lack of discretion for that matter)”

Thanks to all the contributors. June’s Frontline Festival is all about Conflict and Conflict Resolution. Submissions due June 7th.

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