Trolls in Chelsea: How to Manage Meanies

Being agnostic to trolls, I took a day off work for growth and adventure. As I stepped off the train in Manhattan, my phoned beeped of a “tweetup” at the “Black Door.”

A Tweet Walks into a Bar

I got to the hotel and asked the concierge for directions. He looked at me “change your clothes.”

As I washed my face, I thought, “am I the kind of leader that follows tweets into NYC bars?” Apparently yes.

I was in New York for Chris Brogan’s Impact Next workshop. @chrisbrogan and @otherpeopleIdontknowwhoturnedoutobewonderful were “tweeting up” the night before.

About Trolls

Just as I was feeling cool for having (1) been invited to a tweetup (2) changing my clothes (3) loving the conversation the topic turned to “trolls.”

Oh, crud just what is a “troll?” How fast could I google “blogging trolls” while nonchalantly holding my chardonnay?

Troll (Internet)
From Wikipedia, This article is about internet slang.
/ˈtrl//ˈtrɒl/) is someone who posts inflammatory,[1] extraneous, or off-topic messages in an online community, such as a forum, chat room, or blog, with the primary intent of provoking readers into an emotional response[2] or of otherwise disrupting normal on-topic discussion.[3] The noun troll may also refer to the provocative message itself, as in: “That was an excellent troll you posted.”

Oh, trolls Been dealing with them for years. Although mine have always been the flesh and blood type with fierce eyeballs that stared straight into my soul. Their witty and frightening tongues– equally alarming. At times they’ve worked for me, that’s the trickiest. Trolls are teachers, you can learn a lot from a clever troll. I have both converted and promoted many a troll (see, How to Melt a Grinch’s Heart.)

And sometimes you just need to walk away.

Applied Tweetups

I asked Chris how he deals with trolls.

“I used to have the worst time with trolls. Then, I realized that I’m not there to serve them. I’m there for you. That’s when life got better.” -Chris Brogan

Consider that in your leadership. Listen, love, lead, consider, and if necessary, cut bait.

Here’s how succesful bloggers deal with trolls. Similar rules apply in our day jobs.

  • Engage first
  • Identify the issues
  • Don’t take it personally
  • Envision greater good
  • Don’t react
  • Starve them
  • Dismiss

 

Words With Teams: A Simply Insightful Teambuilding Exercise

I’m always looking for ways to keep remote teams connected.  Remote work drives thirst for daily inspiration and touch points.  Sharing words helps.  Words uncover meaning.  Words inform.  Words create community.

I emailed my larger team,

“what’s one word that inspires your leadership?”

Powerful responses within 24 hours, over 40% of my team shared their words with their peers.  Powerful, easy, fun.

Words Provide Insights

Words offered quick insights.  Words revealed values (and therefore what they needed from me).  Joe’s word is “challenge,” I’d  better stretch him.  Sally’s word is “balance,” something may be off.

A Few Highlights

  • Persevere: An excellent leader will persevere despite frustration, exhaustion, discouragement or opposition
  • Navigation: Anyone can steer the boat, but it takes a leader to determine its course. If you know where you are going, others will come on the journey with you
  • Flexibility: It’s important to look at others points of view outside of your own,  or change course when necessary. I think we grow more as an organization and as individuals when we are open to the possibilities
  • Energy: I believe that everyone carries with them a certain “energy” that determines their way of being. It’s not what you do, but how you do it.”
  • Succinct
  • Loyalty:   I believe that loyalty should be at the core of leadership.  You cannot expect a tem to follow your vision if you don’t have loyalty or if they don’t believe their leader is loyal to them.
  • Humor: I try to keep things humorous.  A happy team is a productive team

3 Reasons Your Meeting is a Waste of Time

“Okay, we need everyone’s full attention so here are the meeting rules. No texting. No sidebars. Full participation.”

If you have to start your meeting with ultimatums, something is wrong. Sure you could scold the team into paying attention. Better yet, figure out why they don’t want to.

3 Reasons Your Meeting is a Waste of Time

Wrong Purpose

One of my favorite posts submitted for the Frontline Festival was Jesse Lynn Stoner’s “No More Boring Meetings” The worst meetings are a one-way dump of information. These are meetings of “convenience,” for the leader. The leader asks for “updates” from each team member.

If you do not have a clear purpose for having a meeting, don’t have it. “We always have staff calls on Tuesdays,” does not count as a purpose. Articulate the purpose of the gathering at the outset (or even on the agenda). “By the end of the hour we will have made 4 decisions.”

Wrong People

If you need the decision maker– get her. Nothing frustrates a team more than debating and issue, reaching consensus, and then finding that they were missing key information or that a key stakeholder was not invited. Consider who must be included up front for which portions. Don’t waste time by having people sit through irrelevant topics until their subject comes up. You will gain great respect by honoring other people’s time.

Wrong Process

Determine the appropriate process up front. Unstructured meetings squander time. Create dialogue around topics that matter. Everyone does not need to speak on every topic. But if someone is tuning out, tune in and figure out why. Watch nonverbals. Invite factions to share their side bars with the group. If the meeting gets swonky, take a time out and check in with a few opinion leaders during the break.

You want people leaving your meeting saying, “now that was a great meeting.” “we accomplished so much.”

Great meetings should save time, not waste time.

Optimistic Hearts on a Disappointed Road

I had lunch with some old friends– the kind you miss deeply without even knowing. I was once their leader. Now, I feel powerless to help. I am grateful for the heavy, important hearts entwined in conversation.

Their frustrated hearts continue to survive the downsizing. Other friends have not made out as well. Perhaps,
So much to do, with much less. Limited support. Intense demands. Stress, fear and hope remain.

“Why do you stay?,” I asked the obvious question. I felt an immediate urge to send them my “courage” posts. But it wasn’t just fear they were facing.

Hopeful and Complicated

Their hearts pumped reality. Perhaps yours does too. I understand.

  • “I’m so stressed”
  • “The hours are long”
  • “I am very good at this.”
  • “This is not my passion”
  • “I really need the money”
  • “I shouldn’t let him treat me that way”
  • “I find meaning in this”
  • “My people need me”
  • “I need insurance”
  • “The alternative might be worse”
  • “I have so much invested”

The yellow brick road has bad signage. You could go this way or that way. Dangers and rainbows are everywhere.

When Your Heart Pumps Confusion

My heart feels confused and disappointed. The road should have been brighter for these eager hearts and minds. Lolly Daskal offers some vital advice for disappointed hearts. All are helpful– my favorite is the concept of “Remain”

“Stay congruent with your values. Identify your beliefs and your core convictions, and don’t let yourself get caught up in someone else’s shadows. Maybe you were disappointed because your core convictions were crossed, remain steady within yourself”

When the pressure is tough, keep perspective. You have choices about how to be, how to behave, and what to begin. You can’t control how others are reacting, but you can choose your response to them. Like the team on the yellow brick road, your journey offers many choices. Stay at the center of them.

  • lay down in a poppy field (step back from the situation)
  • involve your inner scarecrow (make some lists of pros and cons)
  • involve others on your journey (find companionship, coaching and conversation)
  • beware of false wizards (no one else has your answer)
  • try on new clothes (take a day off, and hang out with your dream job)
  • bring a bucket of water (be prepared to douse the naysayers)
  • ?

Effective Listening: Necessary, But Not Sufficient

Why aren’t we better at listening? Is it really skills or something deeper?

I’ve been intrigued by a 6 month, Leadership LinkedIn Discussion asking leaders to give “one piece of advice” for new leaders. With over 1300 comments, the discussion was skewed heavily toward one topic: effective listening. How leaders “listen” trumped all other discussion threads including transparency, honesty, and knowing yourself.

Julian Treasure’s Ted Talk,  5 Ways to Listen Better, attracted 1.5M views. Clearly, we know that bad listening is dangerous, or we wouldn’t be so interested.

Bad listening…

  • is contagious
  • discourages future communication
  • disengages
  • destroys trust
  • erodes confidence
  • ?

Listening deteriorates when we are

  • rushed
  • preoccupied
  • distracted
  • multitasking
  • disinterested
  • unskilled
  • intimidating
  • already know the answer
  • don’t really want input
  • ?

We know how to listen

  • Avoid multi-tasking
  • Create a quiet time, free from distractions
  • Connect
  • Empathize
  • Summarize
  • Ask Questions
  • ?

 Perhaps the problem is larger than listening

What we label as skills problems, may be deeper. Listen for what you choose to hear.

Look in the mirror for signs of lost

  • Respect
  • Empowerment
  • Interest
  • Passion
  • Purpose
  • ?

Ready or Not? Do I Really Want That Management Gig?

You’re the best at what you do. You’re a technical genius. You skip to work. And now you’re feeling pressured to move to the next level. You’re honored, and humbled. It would mean more money.

But, you see what your boss goes through. All those people problems. Questions of job security make you queasy.

You are not alone.

Ready, Set Go, Management Here I Come

 A few signs you may be ready

You…

  • believe in the organization’s mission and values
  • are the go-to guy for your peers
  • always fill in when the boss is away
  • find filling-in fulfilling
  • ask great questions
  • have a vision
  • are fired up
  • enjoy inspiring
  • want to make a difference
  • want others to succeed
  • you’re scared (that’s okay)
  • ?

Oh, No, This is Not For Me

Some signs it’s not the time

You…

  • want them to do it your way
  • disagree with senior leadership most of the time
  • find helping a hassle
  • are most attracted to the money
  • dread filling in
  • LOVE the technical parts of the job
  • hate stress
  • crave affirmation
  • detest meetings
  • need a fixed schedule
  • abhor change
  • ?

Why Aren’t You Leading?

My friend ran up to me while we were waiting to pick up our kids. “I’ve got this great idea and I know a lot of people are interested.” I listened. It was brilliant. I was ready to sign up to help. But next she shared, “Nobody’s asked me to start leading it, so why should I volunteer?” And then, “I keep hoping somebody else will step up and take the lead.” I couldn’t help but think that “somebody” was me.

Let me get this right. It’s a great idea. And you COULD do it. You WANT to do it. But you WON’T because no one has THOUGHT of asking you?

“Yeah, I’m just waiting. It would be a lot of work.”
“If you lead it, I will help you,” I offered.
She quickly changed the subject.

She was perfect for the leadership role. Her feelings were hurt, she wanted someone to invite her to lead. Not just someone. The right someone. She is still waiting. No one is leading. The effort is effortless.

“No One Asked Me”

Perhaps this is happening to you. You care deeply. Change must happen. They need you. You are qualified. You have big ideas.

  • “I’m not sure I’m ready.”
  • “I might fail”
  • “I’m scared”
  • “It’s too much work”
  • “I’m too busy”
  • “No one asked me.”

No one is going to ask you to lead.

  • It’s unlikely that the guys in the department down the hall are sitting around thinking of you for that special assignment
  • The folks at church see how much you already have on your plate and think you’re too busy
  • The PTA has no idea you have talent
  • You can see the obvious next step, what makes you sure it’s clear to others?

Leading or Losing

If you wait to be asked, it’s less likely you will have to do anything. If you don’t do it, you cannot fail. Try:

  • Starting small: offer to do the pilot, or one session
  • Co-leading: 2 heads are a great way to start
  • Submitting a proposal
  • Volunteering for a similar effort and take notes
  • ?
  • Or follow this twitter LEADER.

@LetsGrowLeaders I always was a follower but I feel with God’s help I can be a leader. Amen.

Why Aren't You Leading?

My friend ran up to me while we were waiting to pick up our kids. “I’ve got this great idea and I know a lot of people are interested.” I listened. It was brilliant. I was ready to sign up to help. But next she shared, “Nobody’s asked me to start leading it, so why should I volunteer?” And then, “I keep hoping somebody else will step up and take the lead.” I couldn’t help but think that “somebody” was me.

Let me get this right. It’s a great idea. And you COULD do it. You WANT to do it. But you WON’T because no one has THOUGHT of asking you?

“Yeah, I’m just waiting. It would be a lot of work.”
“If you lead it, I will help you,” I offered.
She quickly changed the subject.

She was perfect for the leadership role. Her feelings were hurt, she wanted someone to invite her to lead. Not just someone. The right someone. She is still waiting. No one is leading. The effort is effortless.

“No One Asked Me”

Perhaps this is happening to you. You care deeply. Change must happen. They need you. You are qualified. You have big ideas.

  • “I’m not sure I’m ready.”
  • “I might fail”
  • “I’m scared”
  • “It’s too much work”
  • “I’m too busy”
  • “No one asked me.”

No one is going to ask you to lead.

  • It’s unlikely that the guys in the department down the hall are sitting around thinking of you for that special assignment
  • The folks at church see how much you already have on your plate and think you’re too busy
  • The PTA has no idea you have talent
  • You can see the obvious next step, what makes you sure it’s clear to others?

Leading or Losing

If you wait to be asked, it’s less likely you will have to do anything. If you don’t do it, you cannot fail. Try:

  • Starting small: offer to do the pilot, or one session
  • Co-leading: 2 heads are a great way to start
  • Submitting a proposal
  • Volunteering for a similar effort and take notes
  • ?
  • Or follow this twitter LEADER.

@LetsGrowLeaders I always was a follower but I feel with God’s help I can be a leader. Amen.

20 Ways To Frustrate Your Team

If you are a leader, you will frustrate your team. You don’t mean to. You likely frustrated someone today. I know, I know, your boss frustrates you too.

I asked our community through Let’s Grow Leaders Facebook, Twitter and other social media forums, about “how leaders frustrate their teams ” Please feel free to add yours to the mix.

Leaders Frustrate Their Teams By…

  1. Asking for ideas.. but ignoring them (#1 answer by a landslide)
  2. Not listening (a very strong #2)
  3. Not valuing their contributions, strengths, or accomplishments
  4. Not investing in their growth
  5. Not believing in them
  6. Having an apathetic attitude
  7. Not doing what you say they will
  8. Not leading by example, or living up to what you demand
  9. Being inconsistent
  10. Saying one thing and doing another
  11. Lack of focus
  12. Constantly changing direction
  13. Acting without a plan
  14. Stifling creativity
  15. Unclear communication
  16. Demoralizing as a method of “motivation”
  17. Using carrots and sticks to “build engagement”
  18. Not giving feedback
  19. Complaining about organizational politics
  20. Wasting their time
Oh, and this was just fun. Some boomerang advice.

Drake Australia ‏@DrakeAustralia

“Instead of getting frustrated, consider your bosses imperfections as a blessing.” http://bit.ly/YnYjZ4  via @LetsGrowLeaders

My favorite Facebook quote was from Dan Eberts, “stop treating them like mushrooms by keeping them in the dark and feeding them BS.”

Can We Teach Leaders Humility?

“Humility is not thinking less of yourself, it’s thinking of yourself less” –C. S. Lewis

I’m alarmed by the humility deficit in many leaders.  Why do we reinforce, recognize and promote the brazen and arrogant, over the humble?  Why do we teach our teams to cater to executives as celebrities?

I’m always in awe of the truly humble–those consistently making enormous sacrifices and deflecting the credit.  The most humble leaders are great spiritual teachers.

Is humility teachable?  

Apparently yes. I’m audacious enough to write a post on teaching humility.  Let me add a caveat.  I don’t have humility handled.

Truly humble leaders don’t try to impress us with titles, credentials, or accomplishments.  They pull out the best in us. Or as Max Brown wrote in The Character-Based Leader,

“Humility isn’t timidity or weakness.  It is confidence, wisdom and grace combine with an acknowledgement that we are all imperfect.”

5 Ways To Teach Humility

1. Build Confidence:  Often what passes for arrogance is actually fear.   Some leaders attempt to “humble” other leaders or “put them in their place” through public criticism or embarrassment.  This tactic actually has the opposite impact.  We need leaders who are confident enough to not need to talk about it.http://letsgrowleaders.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/karin-8-copy-300×300.jpg

2. Teach the Art of Great Questions:  
Teach the art of provocative questions.   Teach the power of pause.  Ask your own questions “what does your team think about this idea?”  “Who did you involve in this decision?”

3. Get Them Out of Their Comfort Zone:  Give them a stretch assignment  or project in an area they know nothing about.  I can tell you from experience, nothing is more humbling than being clueless.  Put them in arenas where they must rely on their team or peers to be successful.

4. Give them tools to manage their blind spots:  Do a 360 assessment.  Give them a coach.  Encourage your team to surface and work through their own conflicts.

5. Model it

  • Be a servant leader
  • Admit when you are wrong
  • Coach privately
  • Recognize, honor and reward humble behaviors on teams, as ironic as this sounds.  Minimize desire for folks to “toot their own horn” by tooting it for them.
  • Reject special treatment, even when it’s convenient.  Live by the same rules and standards you expect your team to uphold.

Powerful Presentations: Teaching Your Team To Talk Strategy

A “stand and deliver” presentation on your results is always nerve-wracking.But– watching your team do one is down right scary.

Remember when you…

  • couldn’t sleep the night before
  • were so stressed, you missed the main idea
  • failed to anticipate the political dynamics
  • used the wrong words, which took the entire conversation downhill
  • didn’t have supporting documentation
  • couldn’t answer obvious questions
  • left them with the wrong impression?

What didn’t kill you can make them stronger.

This month I am spending time with each of my Director teams conducting “teaching” operations reviews. Modelled after performance meetings all executives at our company do each quarter, we brought the drill-down to the frontline and middle management level. In fact, in the review I just completed, we had 5 levels of leadership in the room, all working together to become better at selling their strategic stories. Leaders teaching other leaders to build powerful presentations. Leaders growing leaders.

The Powerful Presentations Process

We asked each team to develop a formal Powerpoint deck highlighting their results, opportunities and action plans. The teams co-presented strategic stories to a cross-functional panel of leaders. It was an operations review in every sense of the word. They took me deep into their work. I asked provocative questions, with a twist lots of time-outs and immediate feedback and coaching. My Directors asked too, with a different perspective. Slide by slide, we talked about what could make their presentations more powerful.

The Powerful Presentations Ground Rules

  • All feedback is given in the spirit of love and development
  • This is about teaching you to operate at the next level or more. The questions will be tough, and you may get stuck. That’s okay.
  • We are going to interrupt, give feedback, ask questions, dispute statistics, drill down, question slide format, share stories of our mishaps, and raise political dynamics along the way
  • I also promise to share my “inside voice” (this is what I immediately think when you say that or when you show me that slide)

Crafting Powerful Presentations

We encouraged the teams to build their talk track strategically to answer these 3 questions

  • What key message do you want me to remember?
  • What do you need me to do?
  • Why should I believe in you?

What They Learned about Powerful Presentations: (as reported in the debrief)

About Preparation

  • Anticipate the questions based on execs in attendance (i.e. Finance, HR, Field)
  • Understand every number and point on the slides
  • Have back-up data
  • Understand your back-up data (sounds obvious but can be trickier than you think)
  • Ensure your boss is aligned with everything you are going to share (never blind side your boss)

About the Slides

  • Less is more, keep the slides clean and simple
  • Avoid cutesy graphics and distracting movement
  • Include trending
  • Forecast improvement. Based on this plan, I commit to having this metric be at (X) by (Date)

About the Talk Track

  • Begin with a problem statement, then share actions
  • Call out the opportunity first, if something is a problem point it out (before your audience does)
  • Ask for what you need
  • Be brief and be gone (don’t keep asking for more questions, quit while you’re ahead)
  • Acknowledge and thank your peers (in the room and outside of it)
  • Reference previous presentations (“as Jane just share”)
  • If you don’t know an answer. DON’T make one up
  • It’s not about telling me how hard you work

What I Learned

Lots about…

  • my people
  • the real deal
  • what I must do next
  • the team appreciates this kind of development
  • Ideas from other leaders about building powerful presentations

if you are an executive, take the time to teach your team to build powerful presentations. They will be nervous, it will be a stretch, they will work extra hours and leave frustrated and invigorated.

They will thank you.

Frontline Festival: A Leadership Carnival for Frontline Leaders

I am delighted and humbled by the response to the Frontline Festival. I asked my friends and colleagues to share their best advice for frontline leaders. Wow! Read these posts and you will emerge stronger. Perhaps read one a day, you’ve got enough for a month. I am pleased to share their gifts with you.

I open the Frontline Festival with thoughts on beginnings from Steve Riddle of Lead On, Lead In, sharing When Did Leadership Start to Mean Something To You? The post will make you consider your own leadership journey. The best part is his video, his accent alone may encourage you to inspire leadership in others. My favorite question, “are you the role model that others have been for you?”

On Building a Frontline Team

Jennifer V. Miller of The People Equation discusses how leaders can be pulled in multiple directions when dealing with a challenging employee in Leadership Seesaw – Balancing the One with the Many. The best question, “are you balancing the needs with the one with the needs with the many?” I ask myself just that every day.

David Dye of Trailblaze shares tips for that awkward situation of being promoted over your peers in, But I Thought We Were Friends? I love his practical example, I’ve had conversations that went something like this, “as a friend, I am so sorry that stinks. As the team leader, I can give you tomorrow to take care of the problem, and then we will need you back.”

Dan McCarthy of Great Leadership shares tactical advice for managing conflict in, How To Handle 3 Types of Conflict. I particularly like, “but if there is a problem to be solved, dealing with the emotions first sets the stage for problem solving.”

Leigh Steere of Managing People Better challenges us to move past stereotypes in finding talent and leveraging gifts in her Lead Change Post, 5 Uncomfortable Observations About Workforce Diversity She shares, “Our internal judgments come through, plain as day, in our facial expressions and body language.” Yikes, I do struggle with that one.

On Running Better FrontlineTeams

Dan Rockwell of Leadership Freak helps us decide when to help, in The One and Only Reason to Help. My favorite insight, “Real help takes people to the place they don’t need help.”

Jon Mertz at Thin Difference explores the concept of Infinitethink, how too many choices leads to indecision in his post,

Jesse Lynn Stoner of Seapoint Center shares a great model for running effective meetings in No More Boring Meetings. She shares a map energy flow in an ideal meeting (see left). Wow. I am going to strive for more of that in my meetings.

Wally Bock of Three Star Leadership, reminds us that you’re stuck with your company’s performance review system even if it doesn’t work for most people. And so he gives us practical advice in, Performance Reviews Made Effective. My favorite, “Spend time with your team members. Find out how they’re doing and have conversations with them. That’s a big part of how great bosses do their work, informally, “in the cracks in the system.”

Mike Myatt of N2Growth reminds us to involve the people closest to the work, when improving processes, and to consider what work we can eliminate in his post 100% of Companies Have a Process Problem. I resonated with, “Simplicity Matters: If your process isn’t simple, it’s going to be very expensive, not very usable, and probably not sustainable – put simply, it will fail”

Mark Miller of Great Leaders Serve reminds us that less is more when it comes to communciation in his post, One-Page Bias.  “A single page virtually always creates more buy-in and action than a 20-page report.”

On Frontline Trust and Integrity

Eric Dingler of EricDingler: Whole Life Leadership shares his techniques for building trust in both leaders and followers in his post, Nothing Leads Like the Truth. I like the line, “Nothing moves people more effectively then truth.”

Deborah Parker, of DPJ Training Group offers important and practical advice on establishing trust in her Lead Change Post, Commo Check: 11 Ways to Establish a Trust Message. Some great pragmatic advice, including “Know the audience by being alert and flexible to the circumstances.”

Gail Severini at the Change Whisperer shares her cry for more authentic, inspired leadership in Longing for the Endless Immensity of Great Leadership. “Real leadership is about who you are, what you stand for, and what you dream about.”

Joanne Corley of Management in Minutes reminds us to lead from who we really are in her post, It All Begins With You– You Are the Messenger I like her challenge “We start to live those roles so unconsciously that we lose track of what we really want in life and what role those roles play in that.”

What Motivates at the Frontline?

Robert Tanner at Management is a Journey takes a detailed look at the value of intrinsic rewards in, You’ll Need More Than Money and Benefits Who hasn’t faced a similar problem: ” Robert, I really need this employee to do his job! I pay him well. He has good benefits. I know he knows how to do the job because sometimes he gets it done. He just won’t do it! He has an attitude problem.”

Susan Mazza of Random Acts of Leadership share the importance of reinforcing positive behavior in, Catch Them In the Act. I like this post for it’s practical advice: Reward employees for “speaking up,” “stepping up,” and “standing up.”

Ed Rehkopf of Hospitality Resources International shares 7 specific ways to recognize in, Give Them More Than Just a Paycheck

Peter Friedes encourages us to engage in more “elaborative asking” on our team’s in his post from Lead Change Group, Managers Do You “Ask” Enough? He reminds us, “asking is enabling, telling is limiting, and ignoring is irritating.” Agreed.

On Facing Your Fears

Claudio Morelli also shares a Lead Change Group post about facing your fears to lead during tough time in Saddle Up and Lead. Claudio also recently started a blog of his own, Building Servant Hearts.

Lisa Kohn of Chatsworth Consulting Group presents Running is like leading – 5 key steps towards winning the race where she shares 5 steps for winning the race when faced with challenges of leading. As a runner, I just love the metaphor.

Jonathan Green of Monster Leaders encourages us to stretch outside of our comfort zones and learn across disciplines in his post Do You Know Jack: It’s Time to Become a Well-Rounded Leader? I am a big believer in cross-functional assignments, and this guy lives what he writes.
Next month’s Frontline Festival will focus on Feedback and Coaching. Be sure to tune back in. In fact, why not subscribe for your daily dose of leadership inspiration.

If you would like to be added to the call for posts, please send me an email at letsgrowleaders@gmail.com.